PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Angelos Kolias - Top 30 Publications

Decompressive craniectomy for traumatic intracranial hypertension: application in children.

Traumatic brain injury remains prevalent in children, particularly within the adolescent age group. In severe injury, the priority of treatment is to stabilise the patient initially and prevent the evolution of brain swelling and secondary ischaemia using tiers of medical therapy. The final stage of intervention for such patients is a decompressive craniectomy. Here in, we identify the current evidence for performing decompressive crainectomy in children including the results from the RESCUEicp study.

The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative: Five years on.

Since its inception in 2012, the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) has established itself as a robust example of a trainee-led research collaborative. This article summarises the work of the collaborative over its first 5 years of existence, outlining the structure, its research projects, impact and future directions.

Prospective, multicentre study of external ventricular drainage-related infections in the UK and Ireland.

External ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is a common neurosurgical procedure. EVD-related infection (ERI) is a major complication that can lead to morbidity and mortality. In this study, we aimed to establish a national ERI rate in the UK and Ireland and determine key factors influencing the infection risk.

The role of pharmacotherapy in the management of chronic subdural haematoma.

Temporal profile of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity in severe traumatic brain injury and association with fatal outcome: An observational study.

Both intracranial pressure (ICP) and the cerebrovascular pressure reactivity represent the dysregulation of pathways directly involved in traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathogenesis and have been used to inform clinical management. However, how these parameters evolve over time following injury and whether this evolution has any prognostic importance have not been studied.

A Retrospective Cohort Study to Assess Patient and Physician Reported Outcome Measures After Decompressive Hemicraniectomy for Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke.

Decompressive hemicraniectomy for malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction is known to reduce mortality. However, there are on-going concerns in terms of the quality of life in survivors. We aimed to examine the correlation between patient and physician reported outcome measures in decompressive hemicraniectomy.

The effect of trainee research collaboratives in the UK.

The management and outcome for patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in the United Kingdom.

OBJECTIVE Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) will become an increasingly common presentation in neurosurgical practice as the population ages, but quality evidence is still lacking to guide the optimal management for these patients. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) was established by neurosurgical trainees in 2012 to improve research by combining the efforts of trainees in each of the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland's neurosurgical units (NSUs). The authors present the first study by the BNTRC that describes current management and outcomes for patients with CSDH throughout the UK and Ireland. This provides a resource both for current clinical practice and future clinical research on CSDH. METHODS Data on management and outcomes for patients with CSDH referred to UK and Ireland NSUs were collected prospectively over an 8-month period and audited against criteria predefined from the literature: NSU mortality < 5%, NSU morbidity < 10%, symptomatic recurrence within 60 days requiring repeat surgery < 20%, and unfavorable functional status (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6) at NSU discharge < 30%. RESULTS Data from 1205 patients in 26 NSUs were collected. Bur-hole craniostomy was the most common procedure (89%), and symptomatic recurrence requiring repeat surgery within 60 days was observed in 9% of patients. Criteria on mortality (2%), rate of recurrence (9%), and unfavorable functional outcome (22%) were met, but morbidity was greater than expected (14%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that failure to insert a drain intraoperatively independently predicted recurrence and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.011 and p = 0.048, respectively). Increasing patient age (p < 0.00001), postoperative bed rest (p = 0.019), and use of a single bur hole (p = 0.020) independently predicted unfavorable functional outcomes, but prescription of high-flow oxygen or preoperative use of antiplatelet medications did not. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest prospective CSDH study and helps establish national standards. It has confirmed in a real-world setting the effectiveness of placing a subdural drain. This study identified a number of modifiable prognostic factors but questions the necessity of some common aspects of CSDH management, such as enforced postoperative bed rest. Future studies should seek to establish how practitioners can optimize perioperative care of patients with CSDH to reduce morbidity as well as minimize CSDH recurrence. The BNTRC is unique worldwide, conducting multicenter trainee-led research and audits. This study demonstrates that collaborative research networks are powerful tools to interrogate clinical research questions.

The reporting of study and population characteristics in degenerative cervical myelopathy: A systematic review.

Degenerative cervical myelopathy [DCM] is a disabling and increasingly prevalent condition. Variable reporting in interventional trials of study design and sample characteristics limits the interpretation of pooled outcomes. This is pertinent in DCM where baseline characteristics are known to influence outcome. The present study aims to assess the reporting of the study design and baseline characteristics in DCM as the premise for the development of a standardised reporting set.

Chronic subdural haematoma: disseminating and implementing best practice.

Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension.

Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy in patients with mild head injury.

Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following head injury is uncommon. It can only be diagnosed with confidence if it is known to have developed immediately following trauma and if adequate investigations exclude secondary causes. The recovery is only partial and this has repercussion on patients' quality of life.

The management and outcome for patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in the United Kingdom.

OBJECTIVE Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) will become an increasingly common presentation in neurosurgical practice as the population ages, but quality evidence is still lacking to guide the optimal management for these patients. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) was established by neurosurgical trainees in 2012 to improve research by combining the efforts of trainees in each of the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland's neurosurgical units (NSUs). The authors present the first study by the BNTRC that describes current management and outcomes for patients with CSDH throughout the UK and Ireland. This provides a resource both for current clinical practice and future clinical research on CSDH. METHODS Data on management and outcomes for patients with CSDH referred to UK and Ireland NSUs were collected prospectively over an 8-month period and audited against criteria predefined from the literature: NSU mortality < 5%, NSU morbidity < 10%, symptomatic recurrence within 60 days requiring repeat surgery < 20%, and unfavorable functional status (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6) at NSU discharge < 30%. RESULTS Data from 1205 patients in 26 NSUs were collected. Bur-hole craniostomy was the most common procedure (89%), and symptomatic recurrence requiring repeat surgery within 60 days was observed in 9% of patients. Criteria on mortality (2%), rate of recurrence (9%), and unfavorable functional outcome (22%) were met, but morbidity was greater than expected (14%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that failure to insert a drain intraoperatively independently predicted recurrence and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.011 and p = 0.048, respectively). Increasing patient age (p < 0.00001), postoperative bed rest (p = 0.019), and use of a single bur hole (p = 0.020) independently predicted unfavorable functional outcomes, but prescription of high-flow oxygen or preoperative use of antiplatelet medications did not. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest prospective CSDH study and helps establish national standards. It has confirmed in a real-world setting the effectiveness of placing a subdural drain. This study identified a number of modifiable prognostic factors but questions the necessity of some common aspects of CSDH management, such as enforced postoperative bed rest. Future studies should seek to establish how practitioners can optimize perioperative care of patients with CSDH to reduce morbidity as well as minimize CSDH recurrence. The BNTRC is unique worldwide, conducting multicenter trainee-led research and audits. This study demonstrates that collaborative research networks are powerful tools to interrogate clinical research questions.

Feasibility studies, clinical trials and multicentre collaboration.

The financial outcome of traumatic brain injury: a single centre study.

Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a potentially devastating insult to the brain with high rates of fatality and neurological deficits. TBI can result in substantial costs to the centre providing care. We sought to present the experience of a Major Trauma Centre (MTC) and ascertain the financial implications of this healthcare provision, in particular detailed costs, reimbursement and the surplus or deficit accrued by the centre.

The Role of Surgical Intervention in Traumatic Brain Injury.

The general consensus to optimize the care for severe TBI patients is management at specialized neurotrauma centers with neurosurgical and neurocritical care support and the use of guidelines-based standardized protocols. Over the last decade, significant efforts have been made to define neurotrauma treatment guidelines. However, it is important to recognize the heterogeneity of TBI and that the "one-size-fits-all approach" may not always be appropriate for these patients. Knowledge synthesis activities in neurotrauma are important to define future research agendas. Clinical and research advances have influenced neurotrauma as it continues to mature into a distinct subspecialty of neurosurgery.

Trial of Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension.

The effect of decompressive craniectomy on clinical outcomes in patients with refractory traumatic intracranial hypertension remains unclear.

Reported Outcome Measures in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Systematic Review.

Degenerative cervical myelopathy [DCM] is a disabling and increasingly prevalent group of diseases. Heterogeneous reporting of trial outcomes limits effective inter-study comparison and optimisation of treatment. This is recognised in many fields of healthcare research. The present study aims to assess the heterogeneity of outcome reporting in DCM as the premise for the development of a standardised reporting set.

Erroneous Methodology in "Craniotomy Versus Craniectomy for Acute Traumatic Subdural Hematoma in the United States: A National Retrospective Cohort Analysis".

Transient unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy following intradural spinal surgery.

Modelling of Brain Deformation After Decompressive Craniectomy.

Hyperelastic finite element models, with either an idealized cylindrical geometry or with realistic craniectomy geometries, were used to explore clinical issues relating to decompressive craniectomy. The potential damage in the brain tissue was estimated by calculating the volume of material exceeding a critical shear strain. Results from the idealized model showed how the potentially damaged volume of brain tissue increased with an increasing volume of brain tissue herniating from the skull cavity and with a reduction in craniectomy area. For a given herniated volume, there was a critical craniectomy diameter where the volume exceeding a critical shear strain fell to zero. The effects of details at the craniectomy edge, specifically a fillet radius and a chamfer on the bone margin, were found to be relatively slight, assuming that the dura is retained to provide effective protection. The location in the brain associated with volume expansion and details of the material modeling were found to have a relatively modest effect on the predicted damage volume. The volume of highly sheared material in the realistic models of the craniectomy varied roughly in line with differences in the craniectomy area.

The impact of major trauma centre implementation on the pathways and outcome of traumatic intracranial extradural haematoma in a regional centre.

A new trauma care system with regional major trauma centres (MTC) was implemented on 1st April 2012 across England. We aimed to assess whether this has affected the referral pathways and mortality of patients undergoing emergency craniotomy for extradural haematoma (EDH), where clinical outcome is correlated with the time to intervention.

Survival Trends After Surgery for Acute Subdural Hematoma in Adults Over a 20-year Period.

We sought to determine 30-day survival trends and prognostic factors following surgery for acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) in England and Wales over a 20-year period.

Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented.

Letter to the Editor: Methodological advances in randomized trials.

Predicting the outcome for individual patients with traumatic brain injury: a case-based review.

Traumatic brain injuries result in significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate prediction of prognosis is desirable to inform treatment decisions and counsel family members. Objective To review the currently available prognostic tools for use in traumatic brain injury (TBI), to analyse their value in individual patient management and to appraise ongoing research on prognostic modelling.

Surgical trainee research collaboratives in the UK: an observational study of research activity and publication productivity.

To analyse the research activity and publication output of surgical trainee research collaboratives in the UK.

TO THE EDITOR.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Codman Microsensor Transducer Used for Intraspinal Pressure Monitoring: Findings From the Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study.

Laboratory and human study.

Student-selected components in neurosurgery.

Student-selected components (SSCs) are protected periods of time in the undergraduate medical curriculum which allow students to explore an area of medicine they are interested in. They are particularly valuable in exposing students to smaller specialties like neurosurgery, which are often sparsely covered in the rest of the undergraduate curriculum. Moreover, they provide opportunities for students interested in pursuing a career in neurosurgery to increase their likelihood of being successful in specialty training applications. In this article, we summarise our department's experience of hosting SSCs. Furthermore, we have set out to establish a series of achievable objectives over the course of a typical SSC in neurosurgery. This includes the possibility of participation in research and audit, which, if well planned, can be rewarding for both the student and the host unit. SSCs are an effective means of exposing medical students to neurosurgery and provide a multitude of opportunities for enhancing clinical competencies and career development.