PubTransformer

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Eduardo Bruera - Top 30 Publications

Evaluating Disability Insurance Assistance as a Specific Intervention by Physiatrists at a Cancer Center.

Because of their expertise, physiatrists provide disability insurance assistance for cancer survivors. In this brief report, we perform a descriptive retrospective analysis of all new (354) outpatient physiatry consultations from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. Disability and/or work accommodations were brought up at some point with the physiatrist during the duration of their care for 131 (37%) of 354 patients. More than 90% of the discussions took place during the first visit. Of those patients who had a documented disability/employment discussion, 58 (44.3%) of 131 patients were originally referred for disability assistance specifically, and 58 (44.3%) of 131 also had disability insurance paperwork completed by the physiatrist. Outcomes of initial physiatry disability insurance assistance were 45 (77.6%) of 58 approved/renewed, 5 (8.6%) of 58 denied, and 8 (13.8%) of 58 unknown/died during the disability application process. The median form size was 33 (SD, 25.95) items. This study is the first of its kind and provides an initial look at work-related discussions and support with disability insurance paperwork as a specific intervention provided by physiatrists at a cancer center. The results are compelling and demonstrate that physiatrists frequently provide these interventions. These interventions take considerable time and effort but are generally successful.

Very-Low-Dose Methadone To Treat Refractory Neuropathic Pain in Children with Cancer.

Compared with nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain is a challenging diagnosis to make and successfully treat in children with cancer.

Financial distress in patients with advanced cancer.

We examined the frequency and severity of financial distress (FD) and its association with quality of life (QOL) and symptoms among patients with advanced cancer in France.

Selective Approach for Patients with Advanced Malignancy and Gastrointestinal Obstruction.

The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of tumor-related gastrointestinal obstruction and identify variables associated with functional outcomes and survival in patients with advanced malignancy and gastrointestinal obstruction.

Off-Label Medication Use in the Inpatient Palliative Care Unit.

Although off-label medications are frequently prescribed in palliative care, there are no published studies examining their use in the U.S.

Implementation of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System for Symptom Distress Screening at a Community Cancer Center: A Pilot Program.

Distress screening is mandated by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer; however, there is limited literature on its impact in actual practice. We examined the impact of a pilot distress screening program on access to psychosocial care.

Patient-Reported Usefulness of Acute Cancer Rehabilitation.

Cancer survivors often have unmet needs, and cancer rehabilitation is becoming an integral part of the continuum of care. Understanding the needs and satisfaction of patients undergoing cancer rehabilitation is important for the development of effective programs.

Bispectral Index monitoring in cancer patients undergoing palliative sedation: a preliminary report.

Continuous palliative sedation (PS) is currently titrated based on clinical observation; however, it is often unclear if patients are still aware of their suffering. The aim of this prospective study is to characterize the level of consciousness in patients undergoing PS using Bispectral Index (BIS) monitoring.

The frequency of QTc prolongation among pediatric and young adult patients receiving methadone for cancer pain.

A prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval in pediatric patients is defined as ≥470 msec. Methadone can cause a prolonged QTc interval that can lead to ventricular arrhythmias. The risk of methadone-induced prolongation of the QTc interval in children and young adults is unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of QTc prolongation among pediatric and young adult patients with cancer pain on methadone treatment.

Assessing the prognostic features of a pain classification system in advanced cancer patients.

The Edmonton Classification System for Cancer Pain (ECS-CP) has been shown to predict pain management complexity based on five features: pain mechanism, incident pain, psychological distress, addictive behavior, and cognitive function. The main objective of our study was to explore the association between ECS-CP features and pain treatment outcomes among outpatients managed by a palliative care specialist-led interdisciplinary team.

Snapshot of an Outpatient Supportive Care Center at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Integration of palliative care (PC) in oncology have been found to improve symptom distress, quality of life, and survival in patients with advanced cancer. Early integration is most appropriate in the outpatient setting. However, most PC services in the United States do not have an outpatient component. Our study aims to provide a snapshot of the type of patients and families who are referred to this novel setting for the delivery of early PC.

End-of-Life Care Matters: Palliative Cancer Care Results in Better Care and Lower Costs.

Factors associated with patient-reported subjective well-being among advanced lung or non-colonic gastrointestinal cancer patients.

The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with a feeling of well-being using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS)-Feeling of Well-Being item (ESAS-FWB; where 0 = best and 10 = worst) among advanced lung or non-colonic gastrointestinal cancer patients who were referred to an outpatient palliative care clinic (OPCC). We also examined the association of performance on the ESAS-FWB with overall survival (OS).

Testing the feasibility of using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) to assess caregiver symptom burden.

Caregiver symptom assessment is not part of regular clinical cancer care. The ESAS (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System) is a multidimensional tool regularly used to measure symptom burden in patients but not caregivers. The objectives of the present study were to determine the feasibility of the ESAS in caregiver completion (defined as ≥ 9 of 12 items) and determine its concurrent validity with the Zarit Burden Interview-12 (ZBI-12).

Integrative Oncology Physician Consultations at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Analysis of Demographic, Clinical and Patient Reported Outcomes.

Background: Integrative oncology (IO) is a relatively new field that seeks to bring evidence-based, non-conventional approaches into conventional oncology care in a coordinated and safe manner. Though complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are highly utilized by cancer patients, little is known about the characteristics of patients seeking IO consultation. Methods: Patients presenting for an outpatient IO consultation completed a CAM use questionnaire, Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCaW), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Quality of Life Short Form 12 (SF-12), and post-consultation satisfaction item. Results: 2,474 new patient IO consultations were conducted from 9/2009 to 12/2013 and 2367 (96%) completed at least one measure. Most were female (69%); the most frequent cancer type was breast (29%); 38% had distant/advanced disease; 75% had used a CAM approach in prior 12 months. The most common concerns were seeking an integrative/holistic approach (34%), herbs/supplements (34%), and diet/nutrition (21%). Overall symptom burden was low, with baseline symptom scores (ESAS) highest (worst) for sleep (4.2; SD 2.8), fatigue (4.0; SD 2.8), and well-being (3.8; SD 2.6). On the SF-12, the physical health scores (35.3; SD 7.5) were significantly lower than that of a healthy population (50), but mental health scores were not (46.8; SD 10.2). Satisfaction was high (9.4; SD 1.3) with the consultation. Conclusions: Patients presenting for IO consultation tended to have early stage disease, had previously used a CAM approach, had a relatively low symptom burden, and were most interested in developing an integrative approach to their care or discussing herbs/supplement use.

Qualitative Study on the Perceptions of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients and Their Family Members Regarding End-of-Life Experiences Focusing on Palliative Sedation.

Patients with terminal cancer experience refractory symptoms in the last days of life. Although palliative sedation (PS) is recommended for patients suffering unbearable symptoms with imminent death, it requires clear communication between physicians and patients/caregivers. Understanding the demands and perceptions of patients and caregivers in the end-of-life phase are needed for effective communication.

Nothing left to chance? The impact of locus of control on physical and mental quality of life in terminal cancer patients.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate if locus of control (LOC) predicts various quality of life (QOL) and mental well-being measures among terminally ill cancer patients at the time of palliative care consult.

Increased Symptom Expression among Patients with Delirium Admitted to an Acute Palliative Care Unit.

Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric condition in very ill patients and those at the end of life. Previous case reports found that delirium-induced disinhibition may lead to overexpression of symptoms. It negatively affects communication between patients, family members, and the medical team and can sometimes lead to inappropriate interventions. Better understanding would result in improved care. Our aim was to determine the effect of delirium on the reporting of symptom severity in patients with advanced cancer.

The Evolving Approach to Management of Cancer Cachexia.

Weight loss is distressing to cancer patients and caregivers. Anorexia/cachexia syndrome is characterized by lipolysis and the loss of lean body mass, and is not reversible by increasing caloric intake. The pathophysiology of cancer cachexia is complex and includes symptoms that impact caloric intake, as well as chronic inflammation, hypermetabolism, and hormonal alterations. Cancer patients require routine screening for cachexia and, ideally, interventions should be initiated in the early stages of weight loss. No guidelines exist for the treatment of cancer cachexia. Appetite stimulants, such as megestrol acetate and glucocorticoids, have been shown to increase appetite and weight; however, single pharmaceutical interventions alone for cachexia do not result in meaningful functional outcomes. In the future, clinicians should consider multimodality treatment that is personalized for each patient. These interventions would include nutritional counseling, assessing and treating symptoms that have an impact on caloric intake, and a rational combination of pharmacologic approaches directed at underlying pathophysiology. Use of an appetite stimulant could be considered for patients who exhibit decreased appetite. Treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent should be considered for patients with elevated C-reactive protein, and hormonal alterations resulting from anti-cachexia therapy should be thoughtfully addressed.

Return to the Primary Acute Care Service Among Patients With Multiple Myeloma on an Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit.

Pancytopenia, immunosuppression, and other factors may place patients with multiple myeloma at risk for medical complications. These patients often require inpatient rehabilitation. No previous studies have looked at risk factors for return to the primary acute care service of this patient population.

Could Objective Tests Be Used to Measure Fatigue in Patients With Advanced Cancer?

Assessment of cancer-related fatigue is currently based on patient-reported outcomes. We asked whether objective assessments, such as muscle strength and nutritional markers, can be used as surrogate measures of cancer-related fatigue.

Association Between Multi-frequency Phase Angle and Survival in Patients With Advanced Cancer.

The ability to predict survival accurately has implications in clinical decision making.

The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System 25 Years Later: Past, Present, and Future Developments.

Routine symptom assessment represents the cornerstone of symptom management. Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) is one of the first quantitative symptom assessment batteries that allows for simple and rapid documentation of multiple patient-reported symptoms at the same time.

Overall Survival among Cancer Patients Undergoing Opioid Rotation to Methadone Compared to Other Opioids.

Methadone has been associated with lower overall survival (OS) in patients with chronic pain. There are no data available on the association of methadone with OS in cancer patients.

Referral criteria for outpatient specialty palliative cancer care: an international consensus.

Although outpatient specialty palliative-care clinics improve outcomes, there is no consensus on who should be referred or the optimal timing for referral. In response to this issue, we did a Delphi study to develop consensus on a list of criteria for referral of patients with advanced cancer at secondary or tertiary care hospitals to outpatient palliative care. 60 international experts (26 from North America, 19 from Asia and Australia, and 11 from Europe) on palliative cancer care rated 39 needs-based criteria and 22 time-based criteria in three iterative rounds. Nearly all experts responded in each round. Consensus was defined by an a-priori agreement of 70% or more. Panellists reached consensus on 11 major criteria for referral: severe physical symptoms, severe emotional symptoms, request for hastened death, spiritual or existential crisis, assistance with decision making or care planning, patient request for referral, delirium, spinal cord compression, brain or leptomeningeal metastases, within 3 months of advanced cancer diagnosis for patients with median survival of 1 year or less, and progressive disease despite second-line therapy. Consensus was also reached on 36 minor criteria for specialist palliative-care referral. These criteria, if validated, could provide guidance for identification of patients suitable for outpatient specialty palliative care.

Post-Discharge Survival Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Cancer from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I Trials) Inpatient Unit.

Patients with advanced cancer who progress on standard therapy are potential candidates for phase I clinical trials. Due to their aggressive disease and complex comorbid conditions, these patients often need inpatient admission. This study assessed the outcomes of such patients after they were discharged to hospice care.

Neuroleptics in the management of delirium in patients with advanced cancer.

Delirium is the most common and distressing neuropsychiatric syndrome in cancer patients. Few evidence-based treatment options are available due to the paucity of high quality of studies. In this review, we shall examine the literature on the use of neuroleptics to treat delirium in patients with advanced cancer. Specifically, we will discuss the randomized controlled trials that examined neuroleptics in the front line setting, and studies that explore second-line options for patients with persistent agitation.

A Prospective Study of Hypodermoclysis Performed by Caregivers in the Home Setting.

Decreased oral intake is very common at the end of life. Dehydration can aggravate symptoms, such as fatigue, myoclonus, and confusion. Intravenous hydration at home can be logistically difficult and expensive. Hypodermoclysis is easy to provide and inexpensive; however, it is rarely used to provide hydration at the end of life in the home setting.

Impact of Prophylactic Fentanyl Pectin Nasal Spray on Exercise-Induced Episodic Dyspnea in Cancer Patients: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

Episodic breathlessness is common and debilitating in cancer patients.

Evaluating Disability Insurance Assistance as a Specific Intervention by Physiatrists at a Cancer Center.

Because of their expertise, physiatrists provide disability insurance assistance for cancer survivors. In this brief report, we perform a descriptive retrospective analysis of all new (354) outpatient physiatry consultations from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. Disability and/or work accommodations were brought up at some point with the physiatrist during the duration of their care for 131 (37%) of 354 patients. More than 90% of the discussions took place during the first visit. Of those patients who had a documented disability/employment discussion, 58 (44.3%) of 131 patients were originally referred for disability assistance specifically, and 58 (44.3%) of 131 also had disability insurance paperwork completed by the physiatrist. Outcomes of initial physiatry disability insurance assistance were 45 (77.6%) of 58 approved/renewed, 5 (8.6%) of 58 denied, and 8 (13.8%) of 58 unknown/died during the disability application process. The median form size was 33 (SD, 25.95) items. This study is the first of its kind and provides an initial look at work-related discussions and support with disability insurance paperwork as a specific intervention provided by physiatrists at a cancer center. The results are compelling and demonstrate that physiatrists frequently provide these interventions. These interventions take considerable time and effort but are generally successful.