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Shota Ida - Top 30 Publications

Association Between Laryngopharyngeal Reflux and Radiation-induced Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer.

We investigated whether laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a risk factor for radiation-induced mucositis.

Circulating tumor cells in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Feasibility of detection and quantitation.

The purpose of this study was to present our findings that because circulating tumor cells (CTCs) exist in extremely low numbers, their detection and quantification are challenging.

Successful treatment of radiation-induced mucositis with proton pump inhibitor administration: A report of two laryngeal cancer cases.

Presently, the relationship between laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and radiation-induced mucositis has not been fully explored. In the present study, we report 2 cases of laryngeal cancer in which radiation-induced mucositis ameliorated after proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration. Case 1 was diagnosed with T1aN0M0 right glottis carcinoma and was treated with radiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 46Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of radiation therapy. Case 2 was diagnosed with T2N0M0 supraglottic cancer and was treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 44Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of chemoradiation therapy. In both cases, a remarkable therapeutic effect of PPI was observed in the perilaryngeal areas including the epiglottic vallecula, arytenoid, and postcricoid area. In both cases, LPR involvement was suspected before the onset of radiation therapy. The two cases presented here, indicated a causal relationship between LPR and radiation-induced mucositis. In cases of severe mucositis in the perilaryngeal area in patients with LPR prior to radiation therapy, PPI administration may be an effective therapeutic option.

Dynamic changes in immune cell profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Immunomodulatory effects of chemotherapy.

Tumor cells have evolved sophisticated means of escape from the host immune system. To date, several important immunological phenomena have been revealed in peripheral blood as well as within tumors. In the present study, we first investigated the proportion and activation status of peripheral immune regulatory cells and CD8(+) T-cell subsets in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a multicolor flow cytometer, and then evaluated how therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil modulated the immune cell profile in peripheral blood. The proportion of naïve T cells was lower and that of effector memory T cells (TEM ) was higher in HNSCC patients than in healthy donors. Moreover, the proportions of activated TEM cells and effector T cells (TEFF ) were dramatically increased in patients with advanced stage disease. The proportion of regulatory T cells and CD14(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid-derived suppressor cells was elevated in HNSCC patients. Of note, after therapy, in addition to the transient reduction in immune regulatory cells, decreases in central memory T cells and increases in TEFF cells were observed among CD8(+) T-cell subsets, suggesting differentiation from central memory T cells into TEFF cells. Our results suggested that, despite the immunosuppressive status in HNSCC patients, tumor-specific immune responses mediated by CD8(+) T cells might be induced and maintained. Moreover, chemotherapy can trigger not only a transient reduction in immune regulatory cells but also further activation of CD8(+) T cells.