PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

palliative care - Top 30 Publications

Maintaining family life balance while facing a child's imminent death - a mixed methods study.

To understand parents' experiences and needs during a child's end-of-life care at home and to identify systemic factors that influence its provision.

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome: a novel surgical strategy for small-volume centres?†.

We describe in a prospective study, a novel surgical technique for the management of hypoplastic left heart syndrome inspired by the hybrid Norwood approach.

IL-1β levels are associated with chronic multisite pain in people living with HIV.

The pathophysiology of chronic pain experienced by people living with HIV (PLWH) in the current antiretroviral treatment era is poorly understood. We sought to investigate the relationship between inflammation and chronic pain in PLWH. We hypothesized that, among PLWH who have undetectable HIV viral loads, those with Chronic Multisite Pain (CMP) would have higher levels of circulating pain-related inflammatory markers than those without chronic pain.

Subjective and Objective Taste and Smell Changes In Cancer.

Malnutrition is highly prevalent in cancer patients and an important predictor of morbidity, mortality, treatment response and toxicity. Taste and smell changes (TSCs) are common and may contribute to malnutrition. Research has previously focused on patients receiving chemotherapy (CT) or head and neck radiotherapy (RT). However, TSCs may occur pre-treatment, with other treatment modalities, and in cancer survivors. This review evaluates objective and subjective assessment of taste and smell, discusses the prevalence of TSCs in cancer, and reviews the clinical sequelae of TSCs in cancer patients.

Chemotherapy in end of life care.

Critical attitudes and beliefs towards guidelines amongst palliative care professionals - results from a national survey.

Little is known about palliative care professionals' attitudes towards guidelines. In 2015, the German Association for Palliative Medicine (DGP) published an evidence based guideline for palliative care in adults with incurable cancer. Before publication we conducted a national survey among members of the DGP to detect possible barriers and facilitators for its implementation. The aim of the present publication was to evaluate critical attitudes and beliefs which could hinder the effective implementation of the new guideline and to evaluate differences within professional groups and medical specialisations.

Patients with cancer want more research on end of life care.

Palliative and end of life care should be top priorities for future cancer research, a study suggests.

Latin-American guidelines for cancer pain management.

Cancer is a major public health issue. Poor pain management has devastating consequences that seriously affect quality of life, diminish functionality and place a huge emotional burden on patients and their relatives. A group of Latin American opinion leaders were invited to participate in a meeting to discuss areas associated with cancer pain. The expert panel reviewed the latest literature to draft region-specific guidelines for effective pain management. The guidelines make recommendations on tailoring treatment to the specific type of pain and provide local physicians with the state-of-the art findings in the field. Management should be with pharmacological approaches (nonopioid, adjuvant and opioid analgesics, as well as oncologic therapies and interventional procedures) and nonpharmacological approaches.

A retrospective analysis of care in patients with dementia hospitalized at a tertiary medical center.

Hospitalization is an opportunity to address various aspects related to management of dementia, including the goals of care to avoid futile care. We studied the prevalence of these factors when patients with dementia are hospitalized.

The Anaesthesiologist and Palliative Care in a Newborn with the Adam "Sequence".

Reports focusing on biomedical principlism and the role of anaesthesiologists in palliative care are rare. We present the case of a newborn with multiple craniofacial anomalies and a diagnosis of ADAM "sequence," in which surgical removal of placental adhesions to the dura mater and the correction of meningocele was not indicated due to the very short life expectancy. After 48 hours, the odor from the placenta indicted a necrotic process, which prevented the parents from being close to the child and increased his isolation. Urgent surgery was performed, after which the newborn was transported to the ICU and intubated under controlled mechanical ventilation. The patient died a week later. The principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and respect for autonomy are simultaneously an inspiratory and regulatory framework for clinical practice. Although only necessary procedures are defended, which suggests a position contrary to invasive interventions at the end of life, sometimes they are the best palliative measures that can be taken in cases like the one described here.

The Pathophysiology of Hyperglycemia in Older Adults: Clinical Considerations.

Nearly a quarter of older adults in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and this population is continuing to increase with the aging of the population. Older adults are at high risk for the development of type 2 diabetes due to the combined effects of genetic, lifestyle, and aging influences. The usual defects contributing to type 2 diabetes are further complicated by the natural physiological changes associated with aging as well as the comorbidities and functional impairments that are often present in older people. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes among older adults and the implications for hyperglycemia management in this population.

Prognostic indices for older adults during the year following hospitalization in an acute medical ward: An update.

As population grow older, chronic diseases are more prevalent. It leads to an increase of hospitalization for acute decompensation, sometimes iterative. Management of these patients is not always clear, and care provided is not always proportional to life expectancy. Making decisions in acute situations is not easy.

Cancer Care Access and Outcomes for American Indian Populations in the United States: Challenges and Models for Progress.

Low socioeconomic and health care access realities of being American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) in the United States combined with decades of data documenting poor cancer outcomes for this population provide a population nested within the United States that is analogous to the cancer care landscape of low- and middle-income countries internationally. We reviewed the medical literature with respect to cancer prevention, access to cancer treatment, and access to effective supportive and palliative care for AI/AN populations in the United States. Research confirms poorer cancer outcomes, suboptimal cancer screening, and high-risk cancer behaviors among AI/AN communities. AI/AN cancer patients are less likely to undergo recommended cancer surgeries, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation therapy than their White counterparts. Studies including both rural and urban survivors with AI cancer revealed barriers to receipt of optimal cancer symptom management and proportionally lower hospice use among AI/AN populations. Culturally tailored programs in targeted communities have been shown to mitigate the observed cancer-related health disparities among AI/AN communities. There is still much work to be done to improve cancer-related health outcomes in AI/AN communities, and the goals of the providers serving them corresponds with those propelling the growing interest in global oncology equity. Policy work and more funding are needed to continue to build upon the work that the Indian Health Service and established cancer-related health programs have begun in AI/AN communities.

Levels of Intervention: How Are They Used in Quebec Hospitals?

In order to promote better practices and communication around end-of-life decision-making, several Canadian hospitals in the province of Quebec have developed a tool called "Levels of Intervention" (LOI). No work to date has been published demonstrating improvement since these forms were implemented. The purpose of the present study was to obtain information about the use of LOI forms across Quebec hospitals and to identify gaps in practice as well as areas for improvement. A retrospective study was undertaken of 299 charts of patients who had died in three Quebec hospitals with a LOI ordered. Results were analysed through a principlism ethical framework. High compliance with the level of intervention ordered at the time of death was recorded, as well as high involvement of patient and/or family, demonstrating the efficiency of LOI in promoting respect for autonomy. Other results show delays in end-of-life care discussions in the course of the hospitalization. Only a small proportion of patients who died had a palliative care consultation, which may reflect equity issues in access to care. This study highlights the importance of the LOI in Quebec and the role it is playing in respect for end-of-life preferences as well as in the involvement of patients and families in the decision-making process. Training specific to end-of-life decision-making conversations would help support the LOI form's use, as would developing provincial or national guidelines on the use of LOI to standardize organizational policies and practice around end-of-life care.

Validation of the Spanish Version of the Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire (QODD-ESP) in a Home-Based Cancer Palliative Care Program and Development of the QODD-ESP-12.

Improving quality of death (QOD) is a key goal in palliative care. To our knowledge, no instruments to measure QOD have been validated in Spanish.

Factors driving live discharge from hospice: Provider perspectives.

The proportion of patients disenrolling from hospice prior to death has increased over the decade with significant variations across hospice types and regions. Such trends have raised concerns about live disenrollment's effect on care quality. Live disenrollment may be driven by factors other than patient preference and may create discontinuities in care, disrupting ongoing patient-provider relationships. Researchers have not explored when and how providers make this decision with patients.

Speaking a Different Language.

Family conferences in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) often include palliative care (PC) providers. We do not know how ICU communication differs when the PC team is present.

In patients receiving palliative care, risperidone or haloperidol increased delirium symptoms vs placebo.

Review: Palliative care improves quality of life and symptom burden but does not affect mortality at 1 to 3 months.

Balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era: A single-center registry.

Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) has been limited by the risk of complications and restenosis. However, growing use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has revived interest in this technique. We analyzed the current indications for BAV and outcomes in a single center.

Palliative Care Through Illness Trajectory.

Antipsychotics Worsen Symptoms in Patients with Delirium Who Receive Palliative Care.

Editorial Comment from Dr Pandey to Total proximal ureter substitution using buccal mucosa.

Biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in clinical practice: an Italian intersocietal roadmap.

Biomarkers of brain amyloidosis and neurodegeneration/synaptic dysfunction are featured in recent diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease. Several gaps in our knowledge, however, need to be filled before they can be adopted clinically. The aim of this article is to describe a roadmap, developed by a multidisciplinary task force, to rationally implement biomarkers for Italian Memory Clinics. This roadmap is based on a framework comprising 5 sequential phases: identification of leads for potentially useful biomarkers; development of clinical assays for clinical disease; evaluation of detection of early stages; definition of operating characteristics in relevant populations; and estimation of reducing disease-associated mortality, morbidity, and disability. The roadmap was devised by identifying current evidence of validity, still missing evidence, and action needed to collect this missing evidence. With appropriate adaptation to local, country-specific circumstances, the roadmap can be translated to other countries.

Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare): An International Policy and Practice Imperative.

This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care (Palliare), that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities undertaken by the Palliare project supported through the Erasmus+ K2 Strategic Partnerships funding programme.

Improving palliative care trough teamwork (IMPACTT) in nursing homes: Study design and baseline findings.

The 2014 Institute of Medicine report recommended that healthcare providers caring for individuals with advanced illness have basic palliative care competencies in communication, inter-professional collaboration, and symptom management. Nursing homes, where one in three American decedents live and die, have fallen short of these competency goals. We implemented an intervention study to examine the efficacy of nursing home-based integrated palliative care teams in improving the quality of care processes and outcomes for residents at the end of life.

Erratum to: Access to controlled medicines for anesthesia and surgical care in low-income countries: a narrative review of international drug control systems and policies.

Is surgical treatment ever indicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and if so, based on which scientific rationale?

Metastasis is a common event in renal cell carcinoma. Surgical resection of metastases may be feasible in two scenarios: aiming at palliation, which may be feasible due to reduced radiosensitivity of renal cell cancer, and aiming at prolonging survival, which may be feasible given the rather good prognosis of some patterns of metastasis.

Laser and light-based therapy for cutaneous and soft-tissue metastases of malignant melanoma: a systematic review.

Invasive cutaneous melanoma is a growing health concern. Although surgical excision can effectively treat in situ tumors, use for metastatic melanoma is limited. Laser and light-based therapies may be a valuable palliative treatment option for patients with stage III and stage IV cutaneous metastatic melanoma. Our goal is to review the published literature and provide evidence-based recommendations on laser and light-based palliative therapies for metastatic melanoma. A search of the databases Pubmed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CINAHL was performed on March 10, 2016. Key search terms were related to melanoma, laser, and light-based modalities. Our search initially identified 13,923 articles and 27 original articles met inclusion criteria for our review. Grade of recommendation: C for non-fractionated carbon dioxide laser, Grade of recommendation: D for fractionated carbon dioxide laser, ruby laser, neodymium laser, near-infrared diode laser, and photodynamic therapy. Non-fractionated carbon dioxide laser had the best palliative efficacy of the reviewed laser and light-based therapies, while other treatment modalities may have potential as adjunctive therapy to standard of care.

End-of-Life Care Matters: Palliative Cancer Care Results in Better Care and Lower Costs.