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traveller - Top 30 Publications

A Tale of Black Eschar in a Returning Traveller.

African tick-bite fever is an increasingly common cause for fever in the returning traveller. It needs to be considered in the febrile returning traveller with a characteristic rash: a black eschar.

Crusted Nodules on the Lower Left Arm in a Traveller Returning from South America: A Quiz.

Relationship of altitude mountain sickness and smoking: a Catalan traveller's cohort study.

The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between smoking and altitude mountain sickness in a cohort of travellers to 2500 metres above sea level (masl) or higher.

Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus mononucleosis: Important causes of febrile illness in returned travellers.

Diagnosing the cause of fever in the returned traveller is challenging. Efforts often focus on identifying 'exotic' pathogens. Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections cause clinical features that overlap with many exotic pathogens. The age-matched seroprevalence of both EBV and CMV is greater in tropical then temperate areas. We describe the clinical and laboratory features of returned travellers diagnosed with primary CMV and EBV syndromes.

Malaria prevention recommendations for risk groups visiting sub-Saharan Africa: A survey of European expert opinion and international recommendations.

Malaria prevention can be complex due to the individual characteristics of the traveller, travel destination, duration of stay and type of travel. Our aim in this study was to document malaria chemoprophylaxis recommendations provided by travel-medicine experts in Europe for specific risk groups of travellers visiting malaria-endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa.

Can a galacto-oligosaccharide reduce the risk of traveller's diarrhoea? A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study.

Diarrhoea is a common medical problem affecting travellers to Asia, Africa and Latin America. The use of prophylactic antimicrobial agents may increase the risk of contracting resistant bacteria. Findings indicate that oligosaccharides, i.e. carbohydrate chains of 3-10 monosaccharides, reduce the risk of diarrhoea.

The quantified self during travel: mapping health in a prospective cohort of travellers.

Travel medicine research has remained relatively unchanged in the face of rapid expansion of international travel and is unlikely to meet health challenges beyond infectious diseases. Our aim was to identify the range of health outcomes during travel using real-time monitoring and daily reporting of health behaviours and outcomes and identify traveller subgroups who may benefit from more targeted advice before and during travel.

A rare case of subcutaneous abscess with intercostal muscles involvement by pleural tuberculosis in a Malagasy young traveller.

Lyme disease vs Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome in a returned traveller from Brazil.

What proportion of international travellers acquire a travel-related illness? A review of the literature.

As international travel increases, travellers may be at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases not endemic in their home countries. Many journal articles and reference books related to travel medicine cite that between 22-64% of international travellers become ill during or after travel; however, this information is minimal, outdated and limited by poor generalizability. We aim to provide a current and more accurate estimate of the proportion of international travellers who acquire a travel-related illness.

Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia.

Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia.

6-year review of +Redivi: a prospective registry of imported infectious diseases in Spain.

Understanding and detecting imported diseases is a priority in the prevention and management of prevalent and emergent infectious diseases acquired abroad. The +Redivi network measures the burden of imported infections in Spain and is essential for closing the gap in travel medicine.

Cutaneous Mycobacterium gordonae infection in an elderly diabetic returned traveller.

Mycobacterium gordonae, a low pathogenicity organism, is rarely implicated in skin and soft tissue infections. We present a 77-year-old returned diabetic traveler from rural Sudan with cutaneous M. gordonae infection. Several months of ciprofloxacin, rifampin and ethambutol led to resolution of his plaque, without signs of recurrence at 6-month follow-up.

Individual traveller health priorities and the pre-travel health consultation.

The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers.

The Consul and the Beatnik: The Establishment, Youth Culture and the Beginnings of the Hippy Trail (1966-8).

This paper analyses the attitudes expressed by consular and embassy officials to a new type of traveller they encountered in the mid-1960s. Their observations are contextualised within wider debates concerning 'youth' in the late 1950s and 1960s. Officials distinguished sharply between 'overlanders' (who could be tolerated or accommodated) and 'beatniks' whose behaviour was characterized as illegal and/or unacceptable. Smoking cannabis was identified as a key marker of beatnik behaviour. Officials' observations are contrasted with four accounts by new travellers from the period. The paper concludes with a proposal for an 'anti-nominian' approach to the study of youth cultures: researchers should be more sensitive to the constructed nature of the labels used to identify the various strands of youth identity.

Toscana virus meningo-encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis for elderly travellers returning from Mediterranean countries.

Elderly patients have a long list of differentials for causes of acute confusion and altered consciousness levels, including infectious agents. In addition, elderly, retired patients often have more time to travel for tourism, particularly to exotic, warmer locations. Mediterranean countries such as Spain and Italy are popular holiday destinations for British and other tourists, especially during the winter months. However, these warm climates allow insect vectors to proliferate, increasing the risk of exposure to endemic vectorborne viral infections whilst on vacation. Such infections may not be routinely considered by geriatric medical teams.

Dalbavancin for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy of skin and soft tissue infections in a returning traveller : Proposal for novel treatment indications.

Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are among the most common health problems in travellers returning from tropical and subtropical countries. Importantly, the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogen for purulent SSTIs, with specific drug resistance, such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and those expressing virulence genes, such as Panton-Valentine-leukocidin is higher in tropical regions than in most high resource settings. This poses challenges for the empirical antimicrobial treatment of SSTIs in returning travellers. This short report describes a patient with a recent travel history to Hong Kong, Singapore and the Philippines who presented with multiple mosquito bites on both upper extremities and secondary bacterial superinfection. He had previously been prescribed oral beta-lactam antimicrobial therapy but lacked adherence to this treatment. Based on the risk for MRSA infection and problems with treatment adherence to oral therapy an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with dalbavancin was administered on days 0 and 7. Microbiological culture confirmed presence of MRSA and clinical follow-up demonstrated complete remission of the SSTI within 2 weeks. Dalbavancin is a promising treatment option for empirical parenteral treatment of SSTIs in returning travellers, a population at high risk for beta-lactam resistant S. aureus skin infections.

Prevalence and characteristics of paediatric Type 2 diabetes in the Republic of Ireland.

To establish the prevalence of paediatric Type 2 diabetes in the Republic of Ireland and describe patient demographics, initial presentation, management, outcomes, comorbidities and complications.

Pulmonary infections in the returned traveller.

Pulmonary infections in the returned traveller are a common presentation. A wide variety of infections may present with pulmonary symptoms. It is important for clinicians to differentiate the cause of these symptoms. The risk of contracting certain travel-related pulmonary diseases depends on travel destination, length of stay, activities undertaken and co-morbidities. Some pathogens are found worldwide, whilst others are related to specific locations. This review article will discuss the approach to diagnosing and treating pulmonary infections in the returned traveller.

Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in a traveller returning from the Philippines to Italy, 2016.

Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian parasite responsible for most human cases of malaria in Malaysian Borneo. A timely recognition of infection is crucial because of the risk of severe disease due to the rapid increase in parasitemia. We report a case of P. knowlesi infection in a traveller who developed fever and thrombocytopenia after returning from the Philippines in 2016. Rapid antigen test was negative, microscopy examination showed parasites similar to Plasmodium malariae, with a parasite count of 10,000 parasites per μL blood, while molecular testing identified P. knowlesi infection. Treatment with atovaquone-proguanil led to resolution of fever and restoration of platelet count in two days. P. knowlesi infection should be suspected in febrile travellers returning from South East Asia. Due to the low sensitivity of rapid antigen tests and the low specificity of microscopy, confirmation by molecular tests is recommended.

Dengue virus serotype 3 and Chikungunya virus co-infection in a traveller returning from India to Portugal, November 2016.

We report a case of a laboratory-confirmed Dengue and Chikungunya viruses co-infection imported from India to Portugal in early November 2016. The patient developed fever, retro-orbital pain and generalized myalgia after returning from Delhi, Jaipur, Agra, Rishikesh, Goa and Mumbai. This case highlights the importance of these arboviruses to public health in India where high rates of co-infection have been reported in the last few years, and demonstrates how challenging the laboratory diagnosis of imported co-infection cases can be in non-endemic areas.

Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective. An arts-science community intervention around suicide in an indigenous ethnic minority.

Background: Suicide is a significant public health concern, which impacts on health outcomes. Few suicide research studies have been interdisciplinary. We combined a psychobiographical autopsy with a visual arts autopsy, in which families donated stories, images and objects associated with the lived life of a loved one lost to suicide. From this interdisciplinary research platform, a mediated exhibition was created (Lived Lives) with artist, scientist and families, co-curated by communities, facilitating dialogue, response and public action around suicide prevention. Indigenous ethnic minorities (IEMs) bear a significant increased risk for suicide. Irish Travellers are an IEM with social and cultural parallels with IEMs internationally, experiencing racism, discrimination, and poor health outcomes including elevated suicide rates (SMR 6.6). Methods: An adjusted Lived Lives exhibition, Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective manifested in Pavee Point, the national Traveller and Roma Centre. The project was evaluated by the Travelling Community as to how it related to suicide in their community, how it has shaped their understanding of suicide and its impacts, and its relevance to other socio-cultural contexts, nationally and internationally. The project also obtained feedback from all relevant stakeholders. Evaluation was carried out by an international visual arts research advisor and an independent observer from the field of suicide research. Results: Outputs included an arts-science mediated exhibition with reference to elevated Irish Traveller suicide rates. Digital online learning materials about suicide and its aftermath among Irish Travellers were also produced. The project reached its target audience, with a high level of engagement from members of the Travelling Community. Discussion: The Lived Lives methodology navigated the societal barriers of stigma and silence to foster communication and engagement, working with cultural values, consistent with an adapted intervention. Feedback from this project can inform awareness, health promotion, education and interventions around suicide and its aftermath in IEMs.

Sweet syndrome presenting as a febrile rash in a returning traveller.

Sweet syndrome was discovered in 1964 and is now well described in the dermatology literature. Knowledge of this unique febrile and painful dermatosis is important for the emergency physician because the syndrome can be readily identified and is extremely responsive to oral steroid therapy. Early diagnosis can greatly improve patient satisfaction and avoid days of ineffective treatment. An accurate and timely diagnosis of Sweet syndrome is also important to guide investigation into a number of associated diseases.

Travel-acquired ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae: impact of colonization at individual and community level.

Antibiotic resistance is a rapidly increasing global emergency that calls for action from all of society. Intestinal multidrugresistant (MDR) bacteria have spread worldwide with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) as the most prevalent type. The millions of travelers annually visiting regions with poor hygiene contribute substantially to this spread. Our review explores the underlying data and discusses the consequences of the colonization.

Medications for the prevention and treatment of travellers' diarrhea.

. Travellers' diarrhea (TD) remains one of the most common illnesses encountered by travellers to less developed areas of the world. Because bacterial pathogens such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E. coli , Campylobacter spp. and Shigella spp. are the most frequent causes, antibiotics have been useful in both prevention and treatment of TD.

Challenges identified in a pilot outreach dental service for Traveller children in Hackney, East London.

Inequity of dental health and dental service use for Travellers in the UK. National guidance on improving community oral health, stresses an imperative to involve and engage with "those whose economic, social and environmental circumstances or lifestyle place them at high risk of poor oral health or make it difficult for them to access dental services".

Detection of Zika virus in a traveller from Vietnam to Japan.

We report an imported case of Zika fever in a traveller from Vietnam. Zika virus (ZIKV) is currently widespread in Vietnam. Ongoing transmission of ZIKV has been reported in Southeast Asia, and with frequent travel between neighbouring regions, careful surveillance for imported cases is needed.

A stitch in time: unrecognized retained foreign bodies after a needlefish injury.

We present a case report of a traveller injured by a needlefish in the Caribbean. The needlefish leapt from the ocean and struck the traveller's face at high speed, causing a seemingly superficial puncture wound on his nose. Later, it became apparent that multiple fish bones had broken off and lodged in his nasal cavity, very narrowly missing his cribriform plate. Some bones were discharged spontaneously through his nose over the next 3 months, and one required surgical removal. Our report highlights the importance of urgent radiological examination in patients injured by needlefish, even if the external wound appears insignificant.

Repatriation of human remains following death in international travellers.

Death during international travel and the repatriation of human remains to one's home country is a distressing and expensive process. Much organization is required involving close liaison between various agencies.

Travellers' diarrhoea-a survey of practice.

Travellers' diarrhoea (TD) is a common problem, affecting millions of tourists each year and creating a large economic burden. Risk factors for TD are known and guidelines exist to assist practitioners in advising travellers on how to prevent and treat TD. However, data are lacking regarding actual prescribing practices or approaches used in TD management. This study aims to establish a baseline which identifies uniformities and diversities in practice.