PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses - Top 30 Publications

Screening for Syphilis and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections in Pregnant Women - Guam, 2014.

Prenatal screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can prevent adverse perinatal outcomes. In Guam, the largest of the three U.S. territories in the Pacific, primary and secondary syphilis rates among women increased 473%, from 1.1 to 6.3 per 100,000 during 2009-2013 (1). In 2013, the first congenital syphilis case after no cases since 2008 was reported (1,2). Little is known about STI screening coverage and factors associated with inadequate screening among pregnant women in Guam. This study evaluated the prevalence of screening for syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), chlamydia, and gonorrhea, and examined correlates of inadequate screening among pregnant women in Guam. Data came from the medical records of a randomly selected sample of mothers with live births in 2014 at a large public hospital. Bivariate analyses and multivariable models using Poisson regression were conducted to determine factors associated with inadequate screening for syphilis and other STIs. Although most (93.5%) women received syphilis screening during pregnancy, 26.8% were not screened sufficiently early to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. Many women were not screened for HIV infection (31.1%), chlamydia (25.3%), or gonorrhea (25.7%). Prenatal care and insurance were important factors affecting STI screening during pregnancy. Prenatal care providers play an important role in preventing congenital infections. Policies and programs increasing STI and HIV services for pregnant women and improved access to and use of prenatal care are essential for promoting healthy mothers and infants.

Evaluation of Placental and Fetal Tissue Specimens for Zika Virus Infection - 50 States and District of Columbia, January-December, 2016.

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and detection of Zika virus RNA in clinical and tissue specimens can provide definitive laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection. Whereas duration of viremia is typically short, prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in placental, fetal, and neonatal brain tissue has been reported and can provide key diagnostic information by confirming recent Zika virus infection (2). In accordance with recent guidance (3,4), CDC provides Zika virus testing of placental and fetal tissues in clinical situations where this information could add diagnostic value. This report describes the evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens tested for Zika virus infection in 2016 and the contribution of this testing to the public health response. Among 546 live births with possible maternal Zika virus exposure, for which placental tissues were submitted by the 50 states and District of Columbia (DC), 60 (11%) were positive by Zika virus reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Among 81 pregnancy losses for which placental and/or fetal tissues were submitted, 18 (22%) were positive by Zika virus RT-PCR. Zika virus RT-PCR was positive on placental tissues from 38/363 (10%) live births with maternal serologic evidence of recent unspecified flavivirus infection and from 9/86 (10%) with negative maternal Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) where possible maternal exposure occurred >12 weeks before serum collection. These results demonstrate that Zika virus RT-PCR testing of tissue specimens can provide a confirmed diagnosis of recent maternal Zika virus infection.

Validation of maternal and neonatal tetanus elimination in Equatorial Guinea, 2016.

Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017.

Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly (1). In February 2016, CDC recommended 1) routine testing for Zika virus infection of asymptomatic pregnant women living in areas with ongoing local Zika virus transmission at the first prenatal care visit, 2) retesting during the second trimester for women who initially test negative, and 3) testing of pregnant women with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) at any time during pregnancy (2). To collect information about pregnant women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection* and outcomes in their fetuses and infants, CDC established pregnancy and infant registries (3). During January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017, U.S. territories(†) with local transmission of Zika virus reported 2,549 completed pregnancies(§) (live births and pregnancy losses at any gestational age) with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection; 5% of fetuses or infants resulting from these pregnancies had birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection(¶) (4,5). Among completed pregnancies with positive nucleic acid tests confirming Zika infection identified in the first, second, and third trimesters, the percentage of fetuses or infants with possible Zika-associated birth defects was 8%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. Among liveborn infants, 59% had Zika laboratory testing results reported to the pregnancy and infant registries. Identification and follow-up of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy permits timely and appropriate clinical intervention services (6).

Serious Bacterial Infections Acquired During Treatment of Patients Given a Diagnosis of Chronic Lyme Disease - United States.

The term "chronic Lyme disease" is used by some health care providers as a diagnosis for various constitutional, musculoskeletal, and neuropsychiatric symptoms (1,2). Patients with a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease have been provided a wide range of medications as treatment, including long courses of intravenous (IV) antibiotics (3,4). Studies have not shown that such treatments lead to substantial long-term improvement for patients, and they can be harmful (1,5). This report describes cases of septic shock, osteomyelitis, Clostridium difficile colitis, and paraspinal abscess resulting from treatments for chronic Lyme disease. Patients, clinicians, and public health practitioners should be aware that treatments for chronic Lyme disease can carry serious risks.

A Trial of Itraconazole or Amphotericin B for HIV-Associated Talaromycosis.

Talaromyces marneffei infection is a major cause of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related death in South and Southeast Asia. Guidelines recommend initial treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate, but this drug has substantial side effects, a high cost, and limited availability. Itraconazole is available in oral form, is associated with fewer unacceptable side effects than amphotericin, and is widely used in place of amphotericin; however, clinical trials comparing these two treatments are lacking.

Vital Signs: Health Care-Associated Legionnaires' Disease Surveillance Data from 20 States and a Large Metropolitan Area - United States, 2015.

Legionnaires' disease, a severe pneumonia, is typically acquired through inhalation of aerosolized water containing Legionella bacteria. Legionella can grow in the complex water systems of buildings, including health care facilities. Effective water management programs could prevent the growth of Legionella in building water systems.

Measures Taken to Prevent Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - Puerto Rico, 2016.

Zika virus infection during pregnancy remains a serious health threat in Puerto Rico. Infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly, brain abnormalities, and other severe birth defects (1). From January 1, 2016 through March 29, 2017, Puerto Rico reported approximately 3,300 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection (2). There is currently no vaccine or intervention to prevent the adverse effects of Zika virus infection during pregnancy; therefore, prevention has been the focus of public health activities, especially for pregnant women (3). CDC and the Puerto Rico Department of Health analyzed data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Zika Postpartum Emergency Response (PRAMS-ZPER) survey conducted from August through December 2016 among Puerto Rico residents with a live birth. Most women (98.1%) reported using at least one measure to avoid mosquitos in their home environment. However, only 45.8% of women reported wearing mosquito repellent daily, and 11.5% reported wearing pants and shirts with long sleeves daily. Approximately one third (38.5%) reported abstaining from sex or using condoms consistently throughout pregnancy. Overall, 76.9% of women reported having been tested for Zika virus by their health care provider during the first or second trimester of pregnancy. These results can be used to assess and refine Zika virus infection prevention messaging and interventions for pregnant women and to reinforce measures to promote prenatal testing for Zika.

Reviving a Drug for Tuberculosis?

Management of Septic Shock.

Evolution of Purpura Fulminans.

Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis Infections in Women.

Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis Infections in Women.

Spiraling Out of Control.

sourceR: Classification and source attribution of infectious agents among heterogeneous populations.

Zoonotic diseases are a major cause of morbidity, and productivity losses in both human and animal populations. Identifying the source of food-borne zoonoses (e.g. an animal reservoir or food product) is crucial for the identification and prioritisation of food safety interventions. For many zoonotic diseases it is difficult to attribute human cases to sources of infection because there is little epidemiological information on the cases. However, microbial strain typing allows zoonotic pathogens to be categorised, and the relative frequencies of the strain types among the sources and in human cases allows inference on the likely source of each infection. We introduce sourceR, an R package for quantitative source attribution, aimed at food-borne diseases. It implements a Bayesian model using strain-typed surveillance data from both human cases and source samples, capable of identifying important sources of infection. The model measures the force of infection from each source, allowing for varying survivability, pathogenicity and virulence of pathogen strains, and varying abilities of the sources to act as vehicles of infection. A Bayesian non-parametric (Dirichlet process) approach is used to cluster pathogen strain types by epidemiological behaviour, avoiding model overfitting and allowing detection of strain types associated with potentially high "virulence". sourceR is demonstrated using Campylobacter jejuni isolate data collected in New Zealand between 2005 and 2008. Chicken from a particular poultry supplier was identified as the major source of campylobacteriosis, which is qualitatively similar to results of previous studies using the same dataset. Additionally, the software identifies a cluster of 9 multilocus sequence types with abnormally high 'virulence' in humans. sourceR enables straightforward attribution of cases of zoonotic infection to putative sources of infection. As sourceR develops, we intend it to become an important and flexible resource for food-borne disease attribution studies.

Update on the Epidemiology and Antibiotic Resistance of Ocular Infections.

The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the epidemiology and current antibiotic-resistant threats in ophthalmology.

Risks of Cefuroxime Prophylaxis for Postcataract Endophthalmitis.

Endophthalmitis after cataract surgery is a rare but vision-threatening complication. Intracameral cefuroxime (ICC) has been reported to be effective at reducing the risk, but concerns regarding the risks associated with this intervention remain.

Collagen Cross-linking for Microbial Keratitis.

Collagen cross-linking is gaining popularity not only for arresting the progression of keratoconus but also other indications including management of corneal infections. In this review article, we analyzed the published literature to understand the level of evidence for its use in corneal ulcer. Photoactivated riboflavin and ultraviolet A light are known to possess antimicrobial properties. The treatment also induces formation of inter- and intra-fibrillar bonds, thereby making the corneal collagen resistant to the action of proteases arresting stromal melt. Both properties are well documented in in vitro experiments. The antimicrobial action is seen against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The animal experiments have documented its efficacy against bacterial and fungal keratitis models. The literature on its application in human corneal infection is highly variable and comprises case reports, case series, and comparative nonrandomized and randomized trials. The treatment has been used as primary treatment, adjunctive treatment along with antibiotics, as the first line of treatment as well as for failed medical treatment cases. Even the cases included are of variable severity caused by a variety of microorganisms including culture-negative cases. Furthermore, the treatment protocols are also variable. While most reports show beneficial effects for bacterial corneal ulcer cases, especially those with superficial infiltrate, the effect has been mixed for fungal and parasitic keratitis. In view of these characteristics, we infer that the level of evidence for its use in corneal ulcer is at most weak. We need well-characterized, high-quality, clinical trials of sufficient power to assess its true value.

Adjunctive Therapies for Bacterial Keratitis.

Bacterial keratitis is the most common type among all types of infectious keratitis. Currently, antibiotics are the main-stay of treatment. The objective of this systematic review is to review published clinical studies which discuss the adjunctive treatment of bacterial keratitis to guide clinical decision-making. We reviewed the role of a variety of medications and surgeries which can help in managing bacterial keratitis complications, which include as thinning, perforation, and impaired wound healing. We have included appropriate animal and laboratory studies, case reports and case series, and randomized clinical trials regarding each therapy.

Infectious uveitis: An enigma.

Infectious uveitis accounts for majority of the cases of uveitis in developing countries. It also encompasses an array of various microorganisms and their clinical presentations. Some of these infectious uveitic entities are familiar, while others are newly emerging in the global ophthalmic world. Many of these entities are also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and appropriate, timely management is required to save not the eye, but life of the patient. This review highlights the ocular manifestations of various infectious uveitic entities, relevant to the ophthalmologist.

Decreasing Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use With Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Lines: A Quality Improvement Project in the Acute Care Setting.

An ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous (UGPIV) quality improvement project occurred in an 849-bed tertiary care hospital with a goal to reduce the use of central lines, in particular, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Since implementation, PICCs have decreased by 46.7% overall, and 59 nurses in-hospital are competent in placing UGPIVs. Placement of UGPIVs by the bedside nurse is a key initiative in decreasing PICC use and, potentially, infections.

Antimicrobial resistance patterns, clinical features, and risk factors for septic shock and death of nosocomial E coli bacteremia in adult patients with hematological disease: A monocenter retrospective study in China.

The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance, clinical features, and risk factors for septic shock and death of nosocomial E coli bacteremia in adult patients in a single hematological center in China. A retrospective case-control study of 157 adult hematological patients with 168 episodes of E coli bacteremia was initiated from April 2012 to July 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility as well as antimicrobial co-resistance rates were analyzed. Clinical features and outcomes were also studied. In addition, risk factors for septic shock and death were investigated. Among the 553 positive blood isolates during the study period, the prevalence of E coli was 33.3% and ESBL production strains represented 61.9% of those examined. In all the E coli strains isolated, 85.6% were multidrug-resistance (MDR), 2.4% were extensive drug resistance (XDR), and 6.0% were resistant to carbapenems. More MDR phenotype was noted in ESBL-EC strains (98.6% vs 62.8%, P<.001) and isolates from neutropenic patients (98.6% vs 62.8%, P < .001). In the antimicrobial susceptibility test, carbapenems and amikacin exhibited not only higher in vitro activity against E coli (94.0% and 92.0%, respectively), but lower co-resistance rates to other antibiotics. Carbapenem resistant strains retained full sensitivity to tigecycline and 60% to amikacin. Piperacillin/tazobatam was the third sensitive drug to both ESBL-EC (77.1%) and non-ESBL-EC (86.0%). In our series, 81.6% episodes received appropriate initial antibiotic treatment and no significant decrease in it was found in bacteremia due to ESBL E coli and patients with neutropenia, septic shock. Septic shock was noted in 15.5% patients and the overall 30-day mortality rate was 21.7%. Multivariate analysis revealed that induction chemotherapy (OR 2.126; 95% CI 1.624-11.332; P = .003) and polymicrobial infection (OR 3.628; 95% CI 1.065-21.219; P = .041) were risk factors for septic shock, whereas male (OR 2.223; 95% CI 1.132-12.022; P < .01) and septic shock (OR 52.359; 95% CI 19.951-292.690; P = .030) were risk factors for death.In the hematology department, ESBL-producing and MDR are widely prevalent in E coli bacteremia which is still a major life-threatening problem, especially for patients with septic shock. For empirical antimicrobial therapy, combination based on aminoglycoside, especially amikacin, will be helpful to increase the antimicrobial coverage against ESBL-EC while combining tigecycline with aminoglycoside should be considered for seriously carbapenem-resistant infectious patients.

Characteristics of and risk factors for severe neurological deficit in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis: A case-control study.

Severe neurological deficit (SND) is a rare but major complication of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO). We aimed to determine the risk factors and the variables associated with clinical improvement for SND during PVO.This case-control study included patients without PVO-associated SND enrolled in a prospective randomized antibiotic duration study, and patients with PVO-associated SND managed in 8 French referral centers. Risk factors for SND were determined by logistic regression.Ninety-seven patients with PVO-associated SND cases, and 297 controls were included. Risk factors for SND were epidural abscess [adjusted odds ratio, aOR 8.9 (3.8-21)], cervical [aOR 8.2 (2.8-24)], and/or thoracic involvement [aOR 14.8 (5.6-39)], Staphylococcus aureus PVO [aOR 2.5 (1.1-5.3)], and C-reactive protein (CRP) >150 mg/L [aOR 4.1 (1.9-9)]. Among the 81 patients with PVO-associated SND who were evaluated at 3 months, 62% had a favorable outcome, defined as a modified Rankin score ≤ 3. No factor was found significantly associated with good outcome, whereas high Charlson index [adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) 0.3 (0.1-0.9)], low American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale at diagnosis [aHR 0.4 (0.2-0.9)], and thoracic spinal cord compression [aHR 0.2 (0.08-0.5)] were associated with poor outcome. Duration of antibiotic treatment was not associated with functional outcome.SND is more common in cervical, thoracic, and S. aureus PVO, in the presence of epidural abscess, and when CRP >150 mg/L. Although neurological deterioration occurs in 30% of patients in early follow-up, the functional outcome is quite favorable in most cases after 3 months. The precise impact of optimal surgery and/or corticosteroids therapy must be specified by further studies.

CONSORT: May stereotactic intracavity administration of antibiotics shorten the course of systemic antibiotic therapy for brain abscesses?

Despite advances in surgical techniques in the management of the brain abscess, continuous systemic long-term antibiotics are necessary and crucial. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of intracavity administration of high-dose antibiotics on the course of antibiotic therapy.

On the Cusp.

Empirical MRSA Coverage for Nonpurulent Cellulitis: Swinging the Pendulum Away From Routine Use.

Rare medico-surgical emergency: spinal epidural abscess (about 3 cases).

The awareness about infections in the epidural space is increasing thanks to the development of neurosurgery, including MRI. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare pathology but extremely serious from a functional point of view and potentially life threatening. We report three cases of male patients (the first one aged 52 years, the second 57 years and the third 63 years) with diagnosed spinal epidural abscess. Two patients were admitted to the Neurosurgical Emergencies with slow progressive spinal cord compression evolving in the context of infection. The last patient complained of S1 sciatica pain in his right leg resistant to treatment associated with urinary incontinence. Entrance door of the infection wasn't identified during the initial assessment. All patients underwent spinal cord/radicular decompression surgery and evacuation of the epidural abscess via posterior approach. Bacteriological examination showed pyogenic germ justifying adequate prescription of antibiotic therapy in the three cases. The evolution was favorable in two cases. However one patient died three days after surgery due to severe sepsis.

Bone tuberculosis mimicking malignancy: a case report.

Bone tuberculosis may mimic malignant tumor. We here report the case of a 4-year old child with bone tuberculosis mimicking femoral osteosarcoma. The diagnosis was rectified thanks to anatomo-pathologic examination. This case study underlines the importance of knowing the clinical and radiological aspects of bone tuberculosis which can mimic malignant tumor. In order to avoid any delay in diagnosis, surgeons, pediatricians and radiologists should know that tuberculosis can mimic many pathologies, both clinically and radiologically.

Antibiogram profile of uropathogens isolated at Bahir Dar Regional Health Research Laboratory Centre, Northwest Ethiopia.

Antimicrobial resistance among bacteria that cause urinary tract infection (UTI) has been increasing since the introduction of chemotherapy. This study was aimed to assess the types of isolates from patients with UTI and to determine their current antimicrobial susceptibility profile.

Molecular characterisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated at a large referral hospital in Zambia.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is globally recognized as an important public health problem. Whereas comprehensive molecular typing data of MRSA strains is available, particularly in Europe, North America and Australia, similar information is very limited in sub-Saharan Africa including Zambia.