PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Chemically-Induced Disorders - Top 30 Publications

Persistence of Penicillin Allergy-Reply.

Persistence of Penicillin Allergy.

Need for equity in treatment of substance use among Indigenous people in Canada.

Deaths Involving Fentanyl, Fentanyl Analogs, and U-47700 - 10 States, July-December 2016.

Preliminary estimates of U.S. drug overdose deaths exceeded 60,000 in 2016 and were partially driven by a fivefold increase in overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone), from 3,105 in 2013 to approximately 20,000 in 2016 (1,2). Illicitly manufactured fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50-100 times more potent than morphine, is primarily responsible for this rapid increase (3,4). In addition, fentanyl analogs such as acetylfentanyl, furanylfentanyl, and carfentanil are being detected increasingly in overdose deaths (5,6) and the illicit opioid drug supply (7). Carfentanil is estimated to be 10,000 times more potent than morphine (8). Estimates of the potency of acetylfentanyl and furanylfentanyl vary but suggest that they are less potent than fentanyl (9). Estimates of relative potency have some uncertainty because illicit fentanyl analog potency has not been evaluated in humans. This report describes opioid overdose deaths during July-December 2016 that tested positive for fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, or U-47700, an illicit synthetic opioid, in 10 states participating in CDC's Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) program.* Fentanyl analogs are similar in chemical structure to fentanyl but not routinely detected because specialized toxicology testing is required. Fentanyl was detected in at least half of opioid overdose deaths in seven of 10 states, and 57% of fentanyl-involved deaths also tested positive for other illicit drugs, such as heroin. Fentanyl analogs were present in >10% of opioid overdose deaths in four states, with carfentanil, furanylfentanyl, and acetylfentanyl identified most frequently. Expanded surveillance for opioid overdoses, including testing for fentanyl and fentanyl analogs, assists in tracking the rapidly changing illicit opioid market and informing innovative interventions designed to reduce opioid overdose deaths.

Digital Media and Risks for Adolescent Substance Abuse and Problematic Gambling.

Digital media provide increased opportunities for both marketing and social transmission of risky products and behavior. We briefly review what is known about adolescent exposure to favorable presentations of addictive substances, such as alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, as well as behaviors such as gambling, on social and other online media. Our understanding of these influences and whether they require greater regulation is still developing, and recommendations for future research to address these gaps in our understanding are described. Potential strategies to intervene in these environments to protect adolescents and young adults from the adverse effects of these products are described, as well as future challenges for developing interventions.

The Role of Science in the Opioid Crisis.

Side effects of psychotropic medication: Suggestions for clinical practice.

Psychotropics are highly effective medications that, however, have adverse drug reactions attached to them. They are indispensable for many patients. How to cope with side effects - watchful waiting, dose reduction, change of medication, addition of an "antidote" and behavioural modifications - depends on their nature, severity and finally the patients wish. This review is meant to aid clinician's and patient's decisions in case of the occurrence of compromising, frequent adverse drug reactions.

Age, Racial, and Gender Gaps Are Narrowing in Alcohol Use Disorders.

Increases in alcohol abuse by women, older adults, and minorities outpaced the national average.

Prescribed drug dependence services for long-term BZD use: treating the problem while ignoring its causes.

Lack of associations of the opioid receptor mu 1 (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism (rs1799971) with alcohol dependence: review and meta-analysis of retrospective controlled studies.

Studies have sought associations of the opioid receptor mu 1 (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism (rs1799971) with alcohol-dependence, but findings are inconsistent. We summarize the information as to associations of rs1799971 (A > G) and the alcohol-dependence.

Watch Out for Wild Animals: A Systematic Review of Upper Extremity Injuries Caused by Uncommon Species.

Across the world, many species of nondomesticated animals dwell among humans in metropolitan areas. Rare animal bites pose a dilemma for hand surgeons, as they often result in operative injuries and recalcitrant infections. The authors treated an 85-year-old man who experienced severe cellulitis of the index finger following an opossum bite. This case prompted a systematic review of upper extremity injuries caused by species other than dogs, cats, snakes, and insects.

A Death in the Family.

Treatment of the Opium Neurosis: By Stephen Lett, M.D., Ont., Canada.

Determination of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in forebrain cortex of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days: Comparison with animals after 20 days of morphine withdrawal.

Chronic exposure of mammalian organism to morphine results in adaption to persistent high opioid tone through homeostatic adjustments. Our previous results indicated that in the frontal brain cortex (FBC) of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days, such a compensatory adjustment was detected as large up-regulation of adenylylcyclases I (8-fold) and II (2.5-fold). The other isoforms of AC (III-IX) were unchanged. Importantly, the increase of ACI and ACII was reversible as it disappeared after 20 days of morphine withdrawal. Changes of down-stream signaling molecules such as G proteins and adenylylcyclases should respond to and be preceded by primary changes proceeding at receptor level. Therefore in our present work, we addressed the problem of reversibility of the long-term morphine effects on μ-, δ- and κ-OR protein levels in FBC.

Better.

Ten Steps the Federal Government Should Take Now to Reverse the Opioid Addiction Epidemic.

Exercise as adjunctive treatment for alcohol use disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

To examine whether physical activity as an adjunct to outpatient alcohol treatment has an effect on alcohol consumption following participation in an exercise intervention of six months' duration, and at 12 months after treatment initiation.

Behavioral intervention to reduce opioid overdose among high-risk persons with opioid use disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

The United States is amidst an opioid epidemic, including synthetic opioids that may result in rapid death, leaving minimal opportunity for bystander rescue. We pilot tested a behavioral intervention to reduce the occurrence of opioid overdose among opioid dependent persons at high-risk for subsequent overdose.

Illicit Drug Use, Illicit Drug Use Disorders, and Drug Overdose Deaths in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Areas - United States.

Drug overdoses are a leading cause of injury death in the United States, resulting in approximately 52,000 deaths in 2015. Understanding differences in illicit drug use, illicit drug use disorders, and overall drug overdose deaths in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas is important for informing public health programs, interventions, and policies.

Effect of alcohol intoxication on the risk of venous thromboembolism: A nationwide retrospective cohort study.

This study investigated whether alcohol intoxication (AI) increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD).Using data from the NHIRD, we assembled 61,229 patients with acute AI and randomly selected 244,916 controls. Each patient was monitored from 2000 to 2011 to identify those who were subsequently diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted to determine the risk of VTE in the patients with AI compared with the controls.The incidence rate of DVT during the 10 years follow-up period was 9.36 per 10,000 person-years and 2.07 per 10,000 person-years in the AI and non-AI cohorts, respectively. Moreover, the incidence rate of PE was 4 per 10,000 person-years in the AI cohort and 0.93 in the non-AI cohort. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the risks of DVT and PE were 3.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.83-4.08] and 3.53 (95% CI = 2.69-4.65)-fold higher in the AI cohort than in the non-AI cohort.An increased incidence of VTE was observed among patients with AI. Therefore, physicians should carefully estimate the risk of VTE in patients with AI.

Significance of monitoring plasma concentration of voriconazole in a patient with liver failure: A case report.

Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with liver failure. Voriconazole (VRCZ) is recommended as a primary therapeutic agent for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and metabolized in the liver. Now, data are still lacking on the safety and appropriate dosage of VRCZ in patients with liver failure. Here, we report a representative case of invasive pulmonary fungal infection in a patient with liver failure who was treated with low-dose VRCZ.

Case Series of Successful Postoperative Pain Management in Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Patients.

Buprenorphine maintenance therapy patients frequently have severe postoperative pain due to buprenorphine-induced hyperalgesia and provider use of opioids with limited efficacy in the presence of buprenorphine. The authors report good-to-excellent pain management in 4 obstetric patients using nonopioid analgesics, regional anesthesia, continuation of buprenorphine, and use of opioids with high μ receptor affinity.

Opioids for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: Mistakes Made, Lessons Learned, and Future Directions.

An overreliance on opioids has impacted all types of pain management, making it undoubtedly a root cause of the "epidemic" of prescription opioid abuse in the United States. Yet, an examination of the statistics that led the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to declare that prescription opioid abuse had reached epidemic levels shows that the abuse occurrences and deaths are arising outside the hospital or hospice setting, which strongly implicates the outpatient use of opioids to treat chronic pain. Such abuse and related deaths are occurring in chronic pain patients themselves and also through diversion. Overprescribing to outpatients has afforded distressed and vulnerable individuals access to these highly addictive drugs. The focus of this article is on what we have learned since opioid treatment of chronic pain was first popularized at the end of the 20th century and how this new information can guide chronic pain management in the future.

A Review of Opioid-Sparing Modalities in Perioperative Pain Management: Methods to Decrease Opioid Use Postoperatively.

There is an epidemic of opioid use, abuse, and misuse in the United States, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. It may be difficult to reduce perioperative opioid use given known acute surgical trauma and resultant pain; however, the discrete and often limited nature of postoperative pain also may make management easier in part by utilizing nonopioid modalities, such as regional anesthesia/analgesia, and multimodal analgesia, which may decrease the need for powerful opioids. This article reviews the relevant literature describing the use of adjunct medications, regional anesthesia and analgesic techniques, and regional block additives in the context of providing adequate pain control while lessening opioid use.

Risk Factors for Opioid-Use Disorder and Overdose.

Opioid analgesics are recognized as a legitimate medical therapy for selected patients with severe chronic pain that does not respond to other therapies. However, opioids are associated with risks for patients and society that include misuse, abuse, diversion, addiction, and overdose deaths. Therapeutic success depends on proper candidate selection, assessment before administering opioid therapy, and close monitoring throughout the course of treatment. Risk assessment and prevention include knowledge of patient factors that may contribute to misuse, abuse, addiction, suicide, and respiratory depression. Risk factors for opioid misuse or addiction include past or current substance abuse, untreated psychiatric disorders, younger age, and social or family environments that encourage misuse. Opioid mortality prevalence is higher in people who are middle aged and have substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidities. Suicides are probably undercounted or frequently misclassified in reports of opioid-related poisoning deaths. Greater understanding and better assessment are needed of the risk associated with suicide risk in patients with pain. Clinical tools and an evolving evidence base are available to assist clinicians with identifying patients whose risk factors put them at risk for adverse outcomes with opioids.

Chronic Opioid Use After Surgery: Implications for Perioperative Management in the Face of the Opioid Epidemic.

Physicians, policymakers, and researchers are increasingly focused on finding ways to decrease opioid use and overdose in the United States both of which have sharply increased over the past decade. While many efforts are focused on the management of chronic pain, the use of opioids in surgical patients presents a particularly challenging problem requiring clinicians to balance 2 competing interests: managing acute pain in the immediate postoperative period and minimizing the risks of persistent opioid use after the surgery. Finding ways to minimize this risk is particularly salient in light of a growing literature suggesting that postsurgical patients are at increased risk for chronic opioid use. The perioperative care team, including surgeons and anesthesiologists, is poised to develop clinical- and systems-based interventions aimed at providing pain relief in the immediate postoperative period while also reducing the risks of opioid use longer term. In this paper, we discuss the consequences of chronic opioid use after surgery and present an analysis of the extent to which surgery has been associated with chronic opioid use. We follow with a discussion of the risk factors that are associated with chronic opioid use after surgery and proceed with an analysis of the extent to which opioid-sparing perioperative interventions (eg, nerve blockade) have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic opioid use after surgery. We then conclude with a discussion of future research directions.

Basic/Translational Development of Forthcoming Opioid- and Nonopioid-Targeted Pain Therapeutics.

Opioids represent an efficacious therapeutic modality for some, but not all pain states. Singular reliance on opioid therapy for pain management has limitations, and abuse potential has deleterious consequences for patient and society. Our understanding of pain biology has yielded insights and opportunities for alternatives to conventional opioid agonists. The aim is to have efficacious therapies, with acceptable side effect profiles and minimal abuse potential, which is to say an absence of reinforcing activity in the absence of a pain state. The present work provides a nonexclusive overview of current drug targets and potential future directions of research and development. We discuss channel activators and blockers, including sodium channel blockers, potassium channel activators, and calcium channel blockers; glutamate receptor-targeted agents, including N-methyl-D-aspartate, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid, and metabotropic receptors. Furthermore, we discuss therapeutics targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid, α2-adrenergic, and opioid receptors. We also considered antagonists of angiotensin 2 and Toll receptors and agonists/antagonists of adenosine, purine receptors, and cannabinoids. Novel targets considered are those focusing on lipid mediators and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Of interest is development of novel targeting strategies, which produce long-term alterations in pain signaling, including viral transfection and toxins. We consider issues in the development of druggable molecules, including preclinical screening. While there are examples of successful translation, mechanistically promising preclinical candidates may unexpectedly fail during clinical trials because the preclinical models may not recapitulate the particular human pain condition being addressed. Molecular target characterization can diminish the disconnect between preclinical and humans' targets, which should assist in developing nonaddictive analgesics.

An Evidence-Based Approach to the Prescription Opioid Epidemic in Orthopedic Surgery.

Orthopedic surgery is associated with significant perioperative pain. Providing adequate analgesia is a critical component of patient care and opioids play a vital role in the acute postoperative setting. However, opioid prescribing for patients undergoing orthopedic procedures has recently been identified as a major contributor to the current opioid epidemic. As opioid usage and related morbidity and mortality continue to rise nationwide, opioid-prescribing practices are under increased scrutiny. Here, we update the evidence base and recommendations behind a set of interventions developed at the Hospital for Special Surgery to address the national epidemic at the local level. The main components of our program include (1) guidelines for managing patients who are opioid tolerant and/or have a substance abuse disorder; (2) education programs for patients, emphasizing the role of opioids in recovery after elective orthopedic surgery; (3) education programs for prescribers of controlled substances, including clinical and regulatory aspects; (4) the development of surgery-specific prescribing recommendations for opioid-naive patients; and (5) mechanisms to modify prescribing habits to limit unnecessary prescribing of controlled substances.

The US Opioid Crisis: Current Federal and State Legal Issues.

The United States is in the midst of a devastating opioid misuse epidemic leading to over 33,000 deaths per year from both prescription and illegal opioids. Roughly half of these deaths are attributable to prescription opioids. Federal and state governments have only recently begun to grasp the magnitude of this public health crisis. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released their Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. While not comprehensive in scope, these guidelines attempt to control and regulate opioid prescribing. Other federal agencies involved with the federal regulatory effort include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), and the Department of Justice. Each federal agency has a unique role in helping to stem the burgeoning opioid misuse epidemic. The DEA, working with the Department of Justice, has enforcement power to prosecute pill mills and physicians for illegal prescribing. The DEA could also implement use of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), currently administered at the state level, and use of electronic prescribing for schedule II and III medications. The FDA has authority to approve new and safer formulations of immediate- and long-acting opioid medications. More importantly, the FDA can also ask pharmaceutical companies to cease manufacturing a drug. Additionally, state agencies play a critical role in reducing overdose deaths, protecting the public safety, and promoting the medically appropriate treatment of pain. One of the states' primary roles is the regulation of practice of medicine and the insurance industry within their borders. Utilizing this authority, states can both educate physicians about the dangers of opioids and make physician licensure dependent on registering and using PDMPs when prescribing controlled substances. Almost every state has implemented a PDMP to some degree; however, in addition to mandating their use, increased interstate sharing of prescription information would greatly improve PDMPs' effectiveness. Further, states have the flexibility to promote innovative interventions to reduce harm such as legislation allowing naloxone access without a prescription. While relatively new, these types of laws have allowed first responders, patients, and families access to a lifesaving drug. Finally, states are at the forefront of litigation against pharmaceutical manufacturers. This approach is described as analogous to the initial steps in fighting tobacco companies. In addition to fighting for dollars to support drug treatment programs and education efforts, states are pursuing these lawsuits as a means of holding pharmaceutical companies accountable for misleading marketing of a dangerous product.

America's Opioid Epidemic: Supply and Demand Considerations.

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic characterized by aggressive prescribing practices, highly prevalent opioid misuse, and rising rates of prescription and illicit opioid overdose-related deaths. Medical and lay public sentiment have become more cautious with respect to prescription opioid use in the past few years, but a comprehensive strategy to reduce our reliance on prescription opioids is lacking. Addressing this epidemic through reductions in unnecessary access to these drugs while implementing measures to reduce demand will be important components of any comprehensive solution. Key supply-side measures include avoiding overprescribing, reducing diversion, and discouraging misuse through changes in drug formulations. Important demand-side measures center around educating patients and clinicians regarding the pitfalls of opioid overuse and methods to avoid unnecessary exposure to these drugs. Anesthesiologists, by virtue of their expertise in the use of these drugs and their position in guiding opioid use around the time of surgery, have important roles to play in reducing patient exposure to opioids and providing education about appropriate use. Aside from the many immediate steps that can be taken, clinical and basic research directed at understanding the interaction between pain and opioid misuse is critical to identifying the optimal use of these powerful pain relievers in clinical practice.