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Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases - Top 30 Publications

Disparities in Diabetes Deaths Among Children and Adolescents - United States, 2000-2014.

Diabetes is a common chronic disease of childhood affecting approximately 200,000 children and adolescents in the United States (1). Children and adolescents with diabetes are at increased risk for death from acute complications of diabetes, including hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (2,3); in 2012, CDC reported that during 1968-2009, diabetes mortality among U.S. persons aged ≤19 years declined by 61% (4). CDC observed disparities by race during 1979-2004, with black children and adolescents dying from diabetes at twice the rate of white children and adolescents (5). However, no previous study has examined Hispanic ethnicity. CDC analyzed data from the National Vital Statistics System for deaths among persons aged 1-19 years in the United States during 2000-2014, with diabetes listed as the underlying cause of death overall, and for Hispanic, non-Hispanic white (white), and non-Hispanic black (black) children and adolescents. During 2012-2014, black children and adolescents had the highest diabetes death rate (2.04 per 1 million population), followed by whites (0.92) and Hispanics (0.61). There were no statistically significant changes in diabetes death rates over the study period, but disparities persisted among racial/ethnic groups. Death from diabetes in children and adolescents is potentially preventable through increased awareness of diabetes symptoms (including symptoms of low blood sugar), earlier treatment and education related to diabetes, and management of diabetes ketoacidosis. Continued measures are needed to reduce diabetes mortality in children and understand the cause of racial and ethnic disparities.

Bariatric Surgery or Intensive Medical Therapy for Diabetes after 5 Years.

Aerobic or Resistance Exercise, or Both, in Dieting Obese Older Adults.

Obesity causes frailty in older adults; however, weight loss might accelerate age-related loss of muscle and bone mass and resultant sarcopenia and osteopenia.

Influence of environmental temperature on risk of gestational diabetes.

Cold-induced thermogenesis is known to improve insulin sensitivity, which may become increasingly relevant in the face of global warming. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between outdoor air temperature and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

Long term risk of severe retinopathy in childhood-onset type 1 diabetes: a data linkage study.

To determine the relationship between glycaemic control trajectory and the long term risk of severe complications in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus, as well as the effects of paediatric and adult HbA1c levels.

Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome: A Unique Solute Disturbance.

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening disorder that is an oncologic emergency. Risk factors for TLS are well-known, but the current literature shows case descriptions of unexpected acute TLS. Solid tumors and untreated hematologic tumors can lyse under various circumstances in children and adults. International guidelines and recommendations, including the early involvement of the critical care team, have been put forward to help clinicians properly manage the syndrome. Advanced practice nurses may be in the position of triaging and initiating treatment of patients with TLS, and need a thorough understanding of the syndrome and its treatment.

Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs in Nonmetropolitan Counties - United States, 2016.

Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a clinical practice intended to improve preventive practices and behaviors with a focus on decision-making, problem-solving, and self-care. The distribution and correlates of established DSME programs in nonmetropolitan counties across the United States have not been previously described, nor have the characteristics of the nonmetropolitan counties with DSME programs.

Case 13-2017. A 41-Year-Old Man with Hearing Loss, Seizures, Weakness, and Cognitive Decline.

Urban-Rural Differences in Diabetes-Associated Mortality in China-Reply.

Urban-Rural Differences in Diabetes in China.

Changes in cIAP2, survivin and BimEL expression characterize the switch from autophagy to apoptosis in prolonged starvation.

Autophagy is a catabolic process involving the engulfment of cytoplasmic content within autophagosomes followed by their delivery to lysosomes. This process is a survival mechanism, enabling cells to cope with nutrient deprivation by degradation and recycling of macromolecules. Yet during continued stress such as prolonged starvation, a switch from autophagy to apoptosis is often detected.

Sex differences in micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

Vascular complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both men and women with type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus, however the prevalence, progression and pathophysiology of both microvascular (nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) and macrovascular [coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and stroke] disease are different in the two sexes. In general, men appear to be at a higher risk for diabetic microvascular complications, while the consequences of macrovascular complications may be greater in women. Interestingly, in the absence of diabetes, women have a far lower risk of either micro- or macro-vascular disease compared with men for much of their lifespan. Thus, the presence of diabetes confers greater risk for vascular complications in women compared with men and some of the potential reasons, including contribution of sex hormones and sex-specific risk factors are discussed in this review. There is a growing body of evidence that sex hormones play an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular function. While estrogens are generally considered to be cardioprotective and androgens detrimental to cardiovascular health, recent findings challenge these assumptions and demonstrate diversity and complexity of sex hormone action on target tissues, especially in the setting of diabetes. While some progress has been made toward understanding the underlying mechanisms of sex differences in the pathophysiology of diabetic vascular complications, many questions and controversies remain. Future research leading to understanding of these mechanisms may contribute to personalized- and sex-specific treatment for diabetic micro- and macro-vascular disease.

Mitochondria: a central target for sex differences in pathologies.

It is increasingly acknowledged that a sex and gender specificity affects the occurrence, development, and consequence of a plethora of pathologies. Mitochondria are considered as the powerhouse of the cell because they produce the majority of energy-rich phosphate bonds in the form of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) but they also participate in many other functions like steroid hormone synthesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ionic regulation, and cell death. Adequate cellular energy supply and survival depend on mitochondrial life cycle, a process involving mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and quality control via mitophagy. It appears that mitochondria are the place of marked sexual dimorphism involving mainly oxidative capacities, calcium handling, and resistance to oxidative stress. In turn, sex hormones regulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are the origin of serious mitochondrial genetic diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also an important parameter for a large panel of pathologies including neuromuscular disorders, encephalopathies, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), metabolic disorders, neuropathies, renal dysfunction etc. Many of these pathologies present sex/gender specificity. Here we review the sexual dimorphism of mitochondria from different tissues and how this dimorphism takes part in the sex specificity of important pathologies mainly CVDs and neurological disorders.

Can Parathormon Levels after Ipsilateral Lobectomy Predict Postoperative Hypocalcemia in Patients Undergoing Total Thyroidectomy?

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the serum parathormone (PTH) levels measured after completion of hemithyroidectomy on the first side during total thyroidectomy and the postoperative hypocalcemia. The patients were divided into two groups, as those who demonstrated a decrease in PTH levels measured after completion of hemithyroidectomy of the first side (Group 1, n = 43) and those who did not demonstrate a decrease in PTH levels (Group 2, n = 24). The serum PTH levels were measured just before the incision (PTHi), when the hemithyroidectomy stage had been completed (PTHht), at the end of the operation (PTHtt), and at the postoperative 24th hour (PTH24hr). The serum total calcium (Ca2+) levels were also measured. The median percentage differences in PTHtt levels based on basal PTHi levels of Groups 1 and 2 were -60.6 and -15.7 per cent, respectively, P = 0.001. The frequency of postoperative biochemical hypocalcemia was higher in Group 1, P < 0.05. It was determined that a 10 per cent or higher decrease in PTHht levels in Group 1 could predict biochemical hypocalcemia at the postoperative 24th hour. In conclusions, postoperative hypocalcemia is seen more frequent in patients with a decrease of PTHht during total thyroidectomy. A decrease of 10 per cent in PTHht levels measured after ipsilateral lobectomy and a 62 per cent or higher decrease in PTHtt levels measured in the end of the total thyroidectomy could be helpful for prediction of postoperative hypocalcemia in these patients.

Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes.

In patients who have had type 1 diabetes for 5 years, current recommendations regarding screening for diabetic retinopathy include annual dilated retinal examinations to detect proliferative retinopathy or clinically significant macular edema, both of which require timely intervention to preserve vision. During 30 years of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and its longitudinal follow-up Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, retinal photography was performed at intervals of 6 months to 4 years.

Association of body mass index with clinical outcomes for in-hospital cardiac arrest adult patients following extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Obesity might be associated with disturbance of cannulation in situation of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). However, limited data are available on obesity in the setting of ECPR. Therefore, we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcome in patients underwent ECPR.

Vitamin D status and its association with insulin resistance among type 2 diabetics: A case -control study in Ghana.

Vitamin D plays a major role in physiological processes that modulate mineral metabolism and immune function with probable link to several chronic and infectious conditions. Emerging data suggests a possible influence of vitamin D on glucose homeostasis. This study sought to provide preliminary information on vitamin D status among Ghanaian type 2 diabetics and assessed its association with glucose homeostasis.

Modeling the shape and composition of the human body using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry images.

There is growing evidence that body shape and regional body composition are strong indicators of metabolic health. The purpose of this study was to develop statistical models that accurately describe holistic body shape, thickness, and leanness. We hypothesized that there are unique body shape features that are predictive of mortality beyond standard clinical measures. We developed algorithms to process whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans into body thickness and leanness images. We performed statistical appearance modeling (SAM) and principal component analysis (PCA) to efficiently encode the variance of body shape, leanness, and thickness across sample of 400 older Americans from the Health ABC study. The sample included 200 cases and 200 controls based on 6-year mortality status, matched on sex, race and BMI. The final model contained 52 points outlining the torso, upper arms, thighs, and bony landmarks. Correlation analyses were performed on the PCA parameters to identify body shape features that vary across groups and with metabolic risk. Stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify sex and race, and predict mortality risk as a function of body shape parameters. These parameters are novel body composition features that uniquely identify body phenotypes of different groups and predict mortality risk. Three parameters from a SAM of body leanness and thickness accurately identified sex (training AUC = 0.99) and six accurately identified race (training AUC = 0.91) in the sample dataset. Three parameters from a SAM of only body thickness predicted mortality (training AUC = 0.66, validation AUC = 0.62). Further study is warranted to identify specific shape/composition features that predict other health outcomes.

Metabolic syndrome, serum uric acid and renal risk in patients with T2D.

Metabolic Syndrome (Mets) and increased serum uric acid (SUA), are well known renal risk predictors and often coexist in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether they independently contribute to the onset of CKD is at present unclear.

The relationship between diabetes and colorectal cancer prognosis: A meta-analysis based on the cohort studies.

Though a meta-analysis reported the effect of diabetes on colorectal prognosis in 2013, a series of large-scale long-term cohort studies has comprehensively reported the outcome effect estimates on the relationship between diabetes and colorectal prognosis, and their results were still consistent.

Perirenal fat thickness measured with computed tomography is a reliable estimate of perirenal fat mass.

Deposition of perirenal adipose tissue has been associated with adverse renal and cardiovascular events. We compared various methods to measure perirenal adipose tissue using computerized tomography (CT)-scan and performed correlations with anthropometric measures associated with renal and cardiovascular events. Voluntary overweight and obese subjects undergoing a CT-scan for diagnostic purposes were included in the study. Perirenal adipose tissue volume, adipose tissue area of the renal sinus and perirenal fat thickness were manually measured bilaterally. The intra- and inter-observer coefficient correlations and the correlation between the diverse measures of renal adipose tissue, subcutaneous (SC-)fat and anthropometrics measures were analyzed using Pearson's correlation tests. The forty included patients (24 men, 16 women) had a mean age of 57.6 ± 18.1 years and a mean body mass index of 28.9 ± 2.9 kg/m2. Despite comparable waist circumference, women had a greater SC-fat thickness compared to men, and therefore a smaller amount of visceral fat, as well as smaller perirenal fat volumes. Perirenal fat thickness was better correlated with perirenal fat volume than adipose area of the renal sinus (p <0.02). The adipose area of the renal sinus did not correlate with any anthropometric measures. In women, perirenal fat volume and thickness showed a negative correlation with SC-fat thickness and no correlation with waist circumference. In men, perirenal fat volume and thickness showed a positive correlation with waist circumference and no correlation with subcutaneous fat thickness. In conclusion, perirenal fat thickness measured with CT-scan at the level of the renal veins is a simple and reliable estimate of perirenal fat volume, that correlated negatively with SC-fat in women and positively with waist circumference in men. The adipose area of the renal sinus did not correlate with any anthropometric measure.

Mortality is associated with inflammation, anemia, specific diseases and treatments, and molecular markers.

Lifespan is a complex trait, and longitudinal data for humans are naturally scarce. We report the results of Cox regression and Pearson correlation analyses using data of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), with mortality data of 1518 participants (113 of which died), over a time span of more than 10 years. We found that in the Cox regression model based on the Bayesian information criterion, apart from chronological age of the participant, six baseline variables were considerably associated with higher mortality rates: smoking, mean attachment loss (i.e. loss of tooth supporting tissue), fibrinogen concentration, albumin/creatinine ratio, treated gastritis, and medication during the last 7 days. Except for smoking, the causative contribution of these variables to mortality was deemed inconclusive. In turn, four variables were found to be associated with decreased mortality rates: treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, treatment of dyslipidemia, IGF-1 and being female. Here, being female was an undisputed causative variable, the causal role of IFG-1 was deemed inconclusive, and the treatment effects were deemed protective to the degree that treated subjects feature better survival than respective controls. Using Cox modeling based on the Akaike information criterion, diabetes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and serum calcium were also associated with mortality. The latter two, together with albumin and fibrinogen, aligned with an"integrated albunemia" model of aging proposed recently.

Low cholesterol level associated with severity and outcome of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage: Results from Taiwan Stroke Registry.

The relationship between cholesterol level and hemorrhagic stroke is inconclusive. We hypothesized that low cholesterol levels may have association with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) severity at admission and 3-month outcomes. This study used data obtained from a multi-center stroke registry program in Taiwan. We categorized acute spontaneous ICH patients, based on their baseline levels of total cholesterol (TC) measured at admission, into 3 groups with <160, 160-200 and >200 mg/dL of TC. We evaluated risk of having initial stroke severity, with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >15 and unfavorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score >2, 3-month mortality) after ICH by the TC group. A total of 2444 ICH patients (mean age 62.5±14.2 years; 64.2% men) were included in this study and 854 (34.9%) of them had baseline TC <160 mg/dL. Patients with TC <160 mg/dL presented more often severe neurological deficit (NIHSS >15), with an adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.30), and 3-month mRS >2 (aOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.11-1.78) using patients with TC >200 mg/dL as reference. Those with TC >160 mg/dL and body mass index (BMI) <22 kg/m2 had higher risk of 3-month mortality (aOR 3.94, 95% CI 1.76-8.80). Prior use of lipid-lowering drugs (2.8% of the ICH population) was not associated with initial severity and 3-month outcomes. A total cholesterol level lower than 160 mg/dL was common in patients with acute ICH and was associated with greater neurological severity on presentation and poor 3-month outcomes, especially with lower BMI.

An unusual location of gouty panniculitis: A case report.

Gouty panniculitis, characterised by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in subcutaneous tissue, is a rare clinical manifestation of gout.

Serum resistin positively correlates with serum lipids, but not with insulin resistance, in first-degree relatives of type-2 diabetes patients: an observational study in China.

To investigate whether serum resistin correlated with hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, or insulin resistance (IR) in Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and their first-degree relatives (DFDRs) in a case-control observational study.We determined the serum levels of resistin, plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin, and performed clinical assessments of hypertension, obesity, and IR for 42 T2DM patients, 74 of their DFDRs, and 51 healthy control participants with no family history of T2DM (NC group). The biochemical and clinical variables were compared between the 3 groups, and relationships between serum resistin and the other variables were evaluated using a Pearson correlation analysis.Significant trends were observed in the triglyceride, HbA1c, and resistin levels, in which the values observed in the DFDR group were intermediate to those of the T2DM and NC groups (P < .05 for all). A stratified analysis revealed significant trends in the resistin level and scores for homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indexes for IR and insulin sensitivity in women and in the HbA1c and resistin levels in men (P < .05 for all), with DFDR subjects exhibiting intermediate values. The Pearson analysis showed that serum resistin positively correlated with total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the DFDR group only (P < .05 for both), and that resistin did not correlate significantly with HOMA indexes, blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, BMI, waist or hip circumference, or blood pressure.Our results suggest that elevated serum resistin might contribute to an increased risk of hyperlipidemia in DFDRs of Chinese T2DM patients.

Association between diabetes mellitus and subsequent ovarian cancer in women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

Epidemiologic studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM) might be associated with risk of ovarian cancer; however, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between DM and the incidence of ovarian cancer on the basis of cohort studies.Relevant studies from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library until September 2016 were collected. The summary risk ratio (RR) was used as the effect measure in a random effects model. Sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis, and calculation of publication bias were conducted.Thirteen articles including 14 cohorts comprising a total of 3708, 313 women and reporting 5534 cases of ovarian cancer were included. The summary RR suggested that patients with DM had a higher risk of ovarian cancer than patients without DM (RR: 1.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.34; P = .004), and no evidence of publication bias was found. The subgroup analysis indicated a higher incidence of ovarian cancer in patients with DM in studies published after 2010, studies not conducted in Europe or the United States, studies that did not adjust for body mass index or smoking status, and studies with lower Newcastle-Ottawa Scale scores.The present findings indicated that DM is a risk factor for ovarian cancer, and future large-scale epidemiologic studies should be performed to evaluate this relation in specific populations.

Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism with extensive intracranial calcification in children: First report from Saudi Arabia.

Pediatric idiopathic hypoparathyroidism with extensive intracranial calcifications outside the basal ganglia (BG) is extremely rare with less than 10 cases worldwide.

Dihydromyricetin Protects against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is an important cause of heart failure in diabetic patients. The present study sought to explore the potential effects of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on DCM and its possible mechanism. A diabetic model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in C57BL/6J mice. Two weeks after the STZ injection, mice were randomly allocated into the following 4 groups for treatment: the control group (CON), the control treated with DHM group (CON + DHM), the diabetes group (DM), and the diabetes treated with DHM group (DM + DHM). DHM was dissolved in distilled water and administered daily by gavage. For 14 weeks, the CON + DHM group and DM + DHM group were given a dose of 100 mg/kg/day DHM (Sigma-Aldrich), while the CON and DM groups were intragastrically given equivalent volumes of distilled water. Assessments and comparisons were made among the groups based on cardiac function and structural changes, inflammation factors, markers of oxidative stress, mitochondria function, apoptosis, and autophagy. The DHM treatment normalized body weight, preserved cardiac function, attenuated oxidative stress (MDA, SOD, and GSH-Px), reduced the levels of inflammation factors (IL-6, TNF-α), alleviated pathological changes, improved mitochondrial function (ATP content, CS activity, and complex Ι/ΙΙ/ΙΙΙ/ΙV/V activities), inhibited cardiac apoptosis, and restored autophagy in diabetic mice. DHM may have a great therapeutic potential in the treatment of DCM.

Molecular Abnormalities Underlying Bone Fragility in Chronic Kidney Disease.

Prevention of bone fractures is one goal of therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), as indicated by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. CKD patients, including those on hemodialysis, are at higher risk for fractures and fracture-related death compared to people with normal kidney function. However, few clinicians focus on this issue as it is very difficult to estimate bone fragility. Additionally, uremia-related bone fragility has a more complicated pathological process compared to osteoporosis. There are many uremia-associated factors that contribute to bone fragility, including severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone, and bone mineralization disorders. Uremia also aggravates bone volume loss, disarranges microarchitecture, and increases the deterioration of material properties of bone through abnormal bone cells or excess oxidative stress. In this review, we outline the prevalence of fractures, the interaction of CKD-MBD with osteoporosis in CKD patients, and discuss possible factors that exacerbate the mechanical properties of bone.