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Parasitic Diseases - Top 30 Publications

Visceral leishmaniasis in an environmentally protected area in southeastern Brazil: Epidemiological and laboratory cross-sectional investigation of phlebotomine fauna, wild hosts and canine cases.

Leishmaniasis is a rapidly expanding zoonosis that shows increasing urbanization. Concern exists regarding the role of wildlife in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) transmission, due to frequent natural or anthropogenic environmental changes that facilitate contact between wildlife, humans and their pets. The municipality of Campinas, in southeastern Brazil, initially recorded VL in 2009, when the first autochthonous case was confirmed in a dog living in an upscale residential condominium, located inside an environmentally protected area (EPA). Since then, disease transmission remains restricted to dogs inhabiting two geographically contiguous condominiums within the EPA.

Malaria serology test: what contribution does it make in an endemic country such as Ivory Coast?

Malaria serology test seems to have attracted very little interest in endemic countries such as Ivory Coast. However, this examination has been regularly performed in the parasitology laboratory at the Training and Research Unit of Medical Sciences in Abidjan. Our study aimed to highlight the contribution of malaria serology test in our endemic country context.

Unusual location of multiple hydatidosis, pancreatic and pelvic: about a case.

Hydatid cyst is an infectious disease which is quite frequent in Morocco. Pelvic and pancreatic locations of this parasitic infection are rare, namely exceptional. We report the case of a 66-year old patient who was operated for liver hydatic cyst 6 years before, presenting for chest pain associated with hydatidoptysis. Chest X-ray objectified left hydropneumothorax. Thoraco-abdominopelvic CT showed mediastinal liquid mass as well as multiple hepatic, pancreatic (isthmus), pelvic and left under diaphragmatic cystic lesions. Hydatid serology was positive. Treatment involved thoracotomy associated with medical treatment.

Clinical and immunological profile of 15 Moroccan patients with Hyper IgM syndrome.

Hyper IgM syndrome is a well known genetic (primary) immunodeficiency disorder which was first described in 1961. It is caused by B lymphocyte deficiency characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels and low or zero levels of IgG, IgA, IgE resulting from isotype-switching deficiency. Clinical manifestations are dominated by recurrent infections, especially involving the digestive tube of the ENT sphere and the lungs. This syndrome is caused by B-cell immunoglobulin class switch deficiency and decreased capacity to induce proliferation of T lymphocytes. The net result of these deficiencies is reflected in increased susceptibility to Pneumocystis jiroveci, Cryptosporidium spp and other intracellular organisms as well as high rate of bacterial and viral infections. This study aimed to illustrate the importance of understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with this increased susceptibility to infections in order to allow a better diagnosis and therapy in patients with Hyper IgM syndrome (HIM).

Babesiosis Surveillance - Wisconsin, 2001-2015.

Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Babesia microti, an intraerythocytic protozoan. Babesia microti, like the causal agents for Lyme disease and anaplasmosis, is endemic to the northeastern and upper midwestern United States where it is usually transmitted by the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Although babesiosis is usually a mild to moderate illness, older or immunocompromised persons can develop a serious malaria-like illness that can be fatal without prompt treatment. The most common initial clinical signs and symptoms of babesiosis (fever, fatigue, chills, and diaphoresis) are nonspecific and present diagnostic challenges that can contribute to delays in diagnosis and effective treatment with atovaquone and azithromycin (1). Results of one study revealed a mean delay of 12-14 days from symptom onset to treatment (2). Knowledge of the incidence and geographic distribution of babesiosis can raise the index of clinical suspicion and facilitate more prompt diagnosis and lifesaving treatment (1). The first known case of babesiosis in Wisconsin was detected in 1985 (3), and babesiosis became officially reportable in the state in 2001. Wisconsin babesiosis surveillance data for 2001-2015 were analyzed in 3-year intervals to compare demographic, epidemiologic, and laboratory features among patients with cases of reported babesiosis. To determine possible reasons for an increase in reported Babesia infection, trends in electronic laboratory reporting and diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction testing (PCR) were examined. Between the first and last 3-year analysis intervals, there was a 26-fold increase in the incidence of confirmed babesiosis, in addition to geographic expansion. These trends might be generalizable to other states with endemic disease, similar suburbanization and forest fragmentation patterns, and warming average temperatures (4). Accurate surveillance in states where babesiosis is endemic is necessary to estimate the increasing burden of babesiosis and other tickborne diseases and to develop appropriate public health interventions for prevention and practice.

Two Outbreaks of Trichinellosis Linked to Consumption of Walrus Meat - Alaska, 2016-2017.

During 1975-2012, CDC surveillance identified 1,680 trichinellosis cases in the United States with implicated food items; among these cases, 1,219 were attributed to consumption of raw or pork products, and 461 were attributed to nonpork products. Although trichinellosis in the United States has historically been associated with consumption of pork, multiple nonporcine species of wild game also are competent hosts for Trichinella spp. and have been collectively implicated in the majority of trichinellosis cases since the late 1990s (1-4) (Figure 1). During July 2016-May 2017, the Alaska Division of Public Health (ADPH) investigated two outbreaks of trichinellosis in the Norton Sound region associated with consumption of raw or undercooked walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) meat; five cases were identified in each of the two outbreaks. These were the first multiple-case outbreaks of walrus-associated trichinellosis in Alaska since 1992 (Figure 2). Health care providers should inquire about consumption of commercially prepared and personally harvested meats when evaluating suspected trichinellosis cases, especially in areas where consumption of wild game is commonplace.

Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation for the treatment of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: A preliminary study.

The present study aims to assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) preliminarily.Seventeen patients diagnosed to HAE and treated with MWA (80 watts, 4 min) were retrospectively analyzed. The upper abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed at 1, 6, 12 months after the MWA treatment. The complications were evaluated to assess the safety.The diameters of the lesions in the HAE patients ranged from 1.9 to 4.7 cm. The patients included 10 males and 7 females, aged 26 to 70 (45.82 ± 13.36) years, 5 patients infecting with chronic hepatitis viral B and 8 patients with positive hydatid antibody (IgG). The lesions observed in the postoperative CT (1, 6, 12 months) were calcified compared with those observed in the preoperative CT and without relapse. No serious treatment-related complications occurred after treatment.MWA is a novel and effective therapeutic method for HAE with a single lesion (diameter≤=5 cm). Further studies based on prospective random control trials to confirm our findings are necessary.

The clinical burden of human cystic echinococcosis in Palestine, 2010-2015.

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is classified by the WHO as a neglected disease inflicting economic losses on the health systems of many countries worldwide. The aim of this case-series study was to investigate the burden of human CE in Palestine during the period between 2010 and 2015.

Mosquitoes on a plane: Disinsection will not stop the spread of vector-borne pathogens, a simulation study.

Mosquito-borne diseases are increasingly being recognized as global threats, with increased air travel accelerating their occurrence in travelers and their spread to new locations. Since the early days of aviation, concern over the possible transportation of infected mosquitoes has led to recommendations to disinsect aircraft. Despite rare reports of mosquitoes, most likely transported on aircraft, infecting people far from endemics areas, it is unclear how important the role of incidentally transported mosquitoes is compared to the role of traveling humans. We used data for Plasmodium falciparum and dengue viruses to estimate the probability of introduction of these pathogens by mosquitoes and by humans via aircraft under ideal conditions. The probability of introduction of either pathogen by mosquitoes is low due to few mosquitoes being found on aircraft, low infection prevalence among mosquitoes, and high mortality. Even without disinsection, introduction via infected human travelers was far more likely than introduction by infected mosquitoes; more than 1000 times more likely for P. falciparum and more than 200 times more likely for dengue viruses. Even in the absence of disinsection and under the most favorable conditions, introduction of mosquito-borne pathogens via air travel is far more likely to occur as a result of an infected human travelling rather than the incidental transportation of infected mosquitoes. Thus, while disinsection may serve a role in preventing the spread of vector species and other invasive insects, it is unlikely to impact the spread of mosquito-borne pathogens.

Are scabies and impetigo "normalised"? A cross-sectional comparative study of hospitalised children in northern Australia assessing clinical recognition and treatment of skin infections.

Complications of scabies and impetigo such as glomerulonephritis and invasive bacterial infection in Australian Aboriginal children remain significant problems and the overall global burden of disease attributable to these skin infections remains high despite the availability of effective treatment. We hypothesised that one factor contributing to this high burden is that skin infection is under-recognised and hence under-treated, in settings where prevalence is high.

Predominance of asymptomatic and sub-microscopic infections characterizes the Plasmodium gametocyte reservoir in the Peruvian Amazon.

Malaria transmission requires that Anopheles mosquitoes ingest Plasmodium gametocyte stages circulating in the human bloodstream. In the context of malaria elimination, understanding the epidemiology of gametocytes relative to all Plasmodium infections and the contribution of asymptomatic and sub-microscopic parasite carriers to the gametocyte reservoir is necessary, especially in low endemic settings with predominance of P.vivax. A 13-month longitudinal study was conducted in two communities (n = 1935 individuals) of Loreto Department, Peru, with five active screenings for Plasmodium infections and gametocyte stages by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and reverse transcription (RT)-qPCR, respectively. Parasite prevalence by qPCR was 7.2% for P.vivax (n = 520/7235; range by survey 6.0%-8.1%) and 3.2% for P.falciparum (n = 235/7235; range by survey 0.4%-7.7%). Sub-microscopic infections accounted for 73.5% of P.vivax (range by survey 60%-89%) and almost the totality of P.falciparum cases. Gametocytes were found in 28.4% P.vivax infections (range by survey 18.7%-34.1%), with a peak of 61.5% in one community at the start of the transmission season. About 59.8% of all P.vivax gametocyte carriers were asymptomatic and 31.9% were sub-microscopic. Age patterns for gametocyte prevalence paralleled asexual stage infections and peaked among >15-25 year old individuals. Asexual parasite density was found to be the strongest predictor for P.vivax gametocyte presence in longitudinal multivariate analysis (odds ratio 2.33 [95% confidence interval 1.96, 2.78]; P<0.001). Despite significant differences in seasonality patterns and P.vivax prevalence found at the local scale, sub-microscopic and asymptomatic infections predominate and contribute significantly to the gametocyte reservoir in different communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Control and elimination campaigns need sensitive tools to detect all infections that escape routine malaria surveillance, which may contribute to maintain transmission in the region.

Intrinsic and extrinsic factors related to pathogen infection in wild small mammals in intensive milk cattle and swine production systems.

Understanding the ecological processes that are involved in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens by small mammals may aid adequate and effective management measures. Few attempts have been made to analyze the ecological aspects that influence pathogen infection in small mammals in livestock production systems. We describe the infection of small mammals with Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., Trichinella spp. and Cysticercus fasciolaris and assess the related intrinsic and extrinsic factors in livestock production systems in central Argentina at the small mammal community, population and individual levels.

Human infections caused by free-living amoebae.

[b]Abstract Introduction[/b]. Among free-living amoebae that are widely distributed in nature only four genera/species are known as agents of human infections:[i] Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleriafowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris[/i] and[i] Sappiniapedata[/i]. These amoebae are not well adapted to parasitism, and could exist in the human environment without the need for a host. Infections due to these amoebae, despite low morbidity, are characterized by relatively high mortality rate and pose serious clinical problems. [b]Objectve[/b]. This review study presents and summarizes current knowledge about infections due to pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amoebae focused on epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment based on global literature. [b]State of knowledge[/b]. All four genera have been recognized as etiologic factors of fatal central nervous system infections and other serious diseases in humans. [i]N. fowleri[/i] causes an acute fulminating meningoencephalitis in children and young adults. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. and [i]B.mandrillaris[/i] are opportunistic pathogens causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and disseminated or localized infections which could affect the skin, sinuses, lungs, adrenals and/or bones. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. is also the main agent of acute eye infection -[i] Acanthamoeba keratitis, [/i]mostly in contact lens wearers. However, there is only one recognized case of encephalitis caused by [i]S. pedata. [/i] [b]Conclusions[/b]. Amoebic diseases are difficult to diagnose which leads to delayed treatment, and result in a high mortality rate. Considering those issues, there is an urgent need to draw more attention to this type of diseases.

Invasive forms of canine endoparasites as a potential threat to public health - A review and own studies.

[b]Abstract [/b] Dogs serve as the vectors of serious zoonotic parasitic diseases. In the month of May 2012 - 2014, 339 dog faeces samples from seven public sites in Chełmno, a town in northern Poland, were collected and examined to determine the gastrointestinal parasite fauna of dogs. Each faecal sample was dissected with a needle, checked for tapeworm segments and examined for parasite eggs and oocysts using the flotation and decantation method and a modified Baermann technique. Differences were observed in the degree of parasite species occurrence. The most dominant were [i]Toxocara canis[/i] and Ancylostomatidae. The detected species included: [i]T. canis [/i]and [i]Toxascaris leonina[/i] eggs (23.4% and 10.2%, respectively), as well as eggs from the[i] Ancylostomatidae[/i] family (16.2%),[i] Trichuris vulpis [/i]eggs (6.6%), [i]Taenia[/i] type eggs (4.6%),[i] Dipylidium caninum[/i] (5.2%) and [i]Cystoisospora [/i](Isospora) spp. oocysts (10.9%).

Cerebral toxoplasmosis after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The infection is severe and difficult to diagnose in patients receiving allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It frequently involves the central nervous system. The case is presented of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a 17-year-old youth with Fanconi anaemia treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

First evidence of lymphatic filariasis transmission interruption in Cameroon: Progress towards elimination.

Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is among the 10 neglected tropical diseases targeted for control or elimination by 2020. For LF elimination, the World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed a comprehensive strategy including (i) interruption of LF transmission through large-scale annual treatment (or mass drug administration (MDA)) of all eligible individuals in endemic areas, and (ii) alleviation of LF-associated suffering through morbidity management and disability prevention. In Cameroon, once-yearly mass administration of ivermectin and albendazole has been implemented since 2008. The aim of this study was to assess progress towards the elimination goal, looking specifically at the impact of six rounds of MDA on LF transmission in northern Cameroon.

Efficacy and safety of available treatments for visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil: A multicenter, randomized, open label trial.

There is insufficient evidence to support visceral leishmaniasis (VL) treatment recommendations in Brazil and an urgent need to improve current treatments. Drug combinations may be an option.

Leptospira diversity in animals and humans in Tahiti, French Polynesia.

Leptospirosis is a highly endemic bacterial zoonosis in French Polynesia (FP). Nevertheless, data on the epidemiology of leptospirosis in FP are scarce. We conducted molecular studies on Leptospira isolated from humans and the potential main animal reservoirs in order to identify the most likely sources for human infection.

Human otoacariasis caused by Amblyomma testudinarium: Diagnosis and management: Case report.

Tick infestation of the external auditory canal (EAC) constitutes <1% of all patients presenting with ear complaints. Consequently, parameters for the diagnosis and management of ticks in the EAC have not been established.

Long-term follow-up of elite controllers: Higher risk of complications with HCV coinfection, no association with HIV disease progression.

To estimate the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the development of complications and progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease among HIV-infected elite controllers.Single-center retrospective cohort. Kaplan-Meier methods, prevalence ratios, and Cox proportional-hazards models were used.In all, 55 HIV-infected elite controllers were included in this study. Among them, 45% were HIV/HCV coinfected and 55% were HIV mono-infected. Median follow-up time for the cohort was 11 years. Twenty-five patients experienced a complication and 16 lost elite controller status during the study period. HCV coinfected patients were 4.78 times (95% confidence interval 1.50-15.28) more likely to develop complications compared with HIV mono-infected patients. There was no association between HCV coinfection status and loss of elite control (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.27-2.06).Hepatitis C virus coinfection was significantly associated with the risk of complications even after controlling for sex, injecting drug use, and older age. HCV coinfected patients had higher levels of cellular activation while also having similar levels of lipopolysaccharide and soluble CD14. HCV coinfection was not associated with loss of elite controller status. Taken together, this suggests that HCV coinfection does not directly affect HIV replication dynamics or natural history, but that it may act synergistically with HIV to produce a greater number of associated complications. Continued follow-up will be needed to determine whether HCV cure through the use of direct-acting antivirals among HIV/HCV coinfected elite controllers will make the risk for complications among these patients similar to their HIV mono-infected counterparts.

IgM and IgG responses in Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice using egg and worm antigens: Does response vary with parasitic burden and phase of infection?

Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by trematodes of the genus Schistosoma, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The hepatic pathology of this parasitic disease could develop complications, such as fibrosis and cirrhosis, which can be fatal. The Venezuelan endemic area is considered as one of low transmission, which complicates the detection of infected individuals and signals the importance of improving the sensitivity of immunodiagnostic methods. Using ELISA, an evaluation was conducted of IgM and IgG responses to soluble antigens of eggs and female worms (SEA and SFWA) and excretion-secretion products of eggs and female worms (ESPE and ESPAW) in infected Balb/c mice with different parasitic burden and infection times. A high positivity rate by IgM detection was observed for all antigen preparations in 7-week infections (100% by SEA, SFWA, ESPE, and ESPWA in high parasitic burden) as well as a reduction of this immunoglobulin in chronic infection. Positivity rate for IgG detection was higher in 20-week infections (100% by ESPE in low burden, 100% by SEA and ESPE in medium burden, and 100% by ESPE and ESPAW in high burden conditions). The potential use of combined or unique antigenic preparations associated with IgM or IgG for detection of active infection, regardless the parasitic burden, was demonstrated. Differences between immunoglobulin responses show its application for phase-specific diagnosis.

Interleukin-4 receptor alpha is still required after Th2 polarization for the maintenance and the recall of protective immunity to Nematode infection.

There is currently no vaccine against parasitic nematodes and the knowledge on the mechanisms by which protective immunity against this class of parasites is achieved is continuously expanding. Nematode parasites trigger a host protective type 2 immune response via interleukin-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα). Despite this central role, it is not known whether IL-4Rα has a role in maintaining host type 2 immune responses following polarization. To determine the role of IL-4Rα after polarization, we used a recently established strain of rosaCreERT2-/+IL-4Rα-/Lox mice where il4rα gene deletion can be temporally controlled. We show that sustained expression of IL-4Rα is required for the maintenance of type 2 immune responses and protective immunity following interruption after polarization with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis primary infection. Moreover, we show by temporal deletion of IL-4Rα prior to secondary infection with N. brasiliensis that signaling via this receptor drives more efficient recall of type 2 immune responses and clearance of the parasites. Together, this study demonstrates that sustained IL-4Rα mediated signaling is required for the maintenance of anti-nematode type 2 immune responses, describing a novel function for IL-4Rα that is distinct from its role in immune polarization.

Chronic Trichuris muris infection causes neoplastic change in the intestine and exacerbates tumour formation in APC min/+ mice.

Incidences of infection-related cancers are on the rise in developing countries where the prevalence of intestinal nematode worm infections are also high. Trichuris muris (T. muris) is a murine gut-dwelling nematode that is the direct model for human T. trichiura, one of the major soil-transmitted helminth infections of humans. In order to assess whether chronic infection with T. muris does indeed influence the development of cancer hallmarks, both wild type mice and colon cancer model (APC min/+) mice were infected with this parasite. Parasite infection in wild type mice led to the development of neoplastic change similar to that seen in mice that had been treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane. Additionally, both chronic and acute infection in the APCmin/+ mice led to an enhanced tumour development that was distinct to the site of infection suggesting systemic control. By blocking the parasite induced T regulatory response in these mice, the increase in the number of tumours following infection was abrogated. Thus T. muris infection alone causes an increase in gut pathologies that are known to be markers of cancer but also increases the incidence of tumour formation in a colon cancer model. The influence of parasitic worm infection on the development of cancer may therefore be significant.

A study of ticks and tick-borne livestock pathogens in Pakistan.

As obligate blood-feeding arthropods, ticks transmit pathogens to humans and domestic animals more often than other arthropod vectors. Livestock farming plays a vital role in the rural economy of Pakistan, and tick infestation causes serious problems with it. However, research on tick species diversity and tick-borne pathogens has rarely been conducted in Pakistan. In this study, a systematic investigation of the tick species infesting livestock in different ecological regions of Pakistan was conducted to determine the microbiome and pathobiome diversity in the indigenous ticks.

Effect of praziquantel on the differential expression of mouse hepatic genes and parasite ATP binding cassette transporter gene family members during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by sexually dimorphic blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Praziquantel (PZQ) is the only drug widely available to treat the disease but does not kill juvenile parasites. Here we report the use of next generation sequencing to study the transcriptional effect of PZQ on murine hepatic inflammatory, immune and fibrotic responses to Schistosoma mansoni worms and eggs. An initial T helper cell 1 (Th1) response is induced against schistosomes in mice treated with drug vehicle (Vh) around the time egg laying begins, followed by a T helper cell 2 (Th2) response and the induction of genes whose action leads to granuloma formation and fibrosis. When PZQ is administered at this time, there is a significant reduction in egg burden yet the hepatic Th1, Th2 and fibrotic responses are still observed in the absence of granuloma formation suggesting some degree of gene regulation may be induced by antigens released from the dying adult worms. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the relative expression of 16 juvenile and adult S. mansoni genes during infection and their response to Vh and PZQ treatment in vivo. While the response of stress genes in adult parasites suggests the worms were alive immediately following exposure to PZQ, they were unable to induce transcription of any of the 9 genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters tested. In contrast, juvenile schistosomes were able to significantly induce the activities of ABCB, C and G family members, underscoring the possibility that these efflux systems play a major role in drug resistance.

Point-of-care testing for Toxoplasma gondii IgG/IgM using Toxoplasma ICT IgG-IgM test with sera from the United States and implications for developing countries.

Congenital toxoplasmosis is a serious but preventable and treatable disease. Gestational screening facilitates early detection and treatment of primary acquisition. Thus, fetal infection can be promptly diagnosed and treated and outcomes can be improved.

Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus.

Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that can proceed to more severe or debilitating symptoms. The growing overlap in the geographical distribution of these mosquito-borne infections has led to an upsurge in reported cases of DENV/CHIKV co-infections. Unfortunately, at present we have little understanding of consequences of the co-infections to the human host. The overall aim of this study was to define viral replication dynamics and the innate immune signature involved in concurrent DENV and CHIKV infections in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We demonstrate that concomitant infection resulted in a significant reduction of CHIKV progeny and moderate enhancement of DENV production. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of DENV on CHIKV infection occurred independently of DENV replication. Furthermore, changes in type I IFN, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and IP-10 production were observed during concomitant infections. Notably, co-infections led to a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, cytokines that are widely considered to play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of both viral diseases. In conclusion, our study reveals the interplay of DENV/CHIKV during concomitant infection and provides a framework to investigate viral interaction during co-infections.

Genomic introgression mapping of field-derived multiple-anthelmintic resistance in Teladorsagia circumcincta.

Preventive chemotherapy has long been practiced against nematode parasites of livestock, leading to widespread drug resistance, and is increasingly being adopted for eradication of human parasitic nematodes even though it is similarly likely to lead to drug resistance. Given that the genetic architecture of resistance is poorly understood for any nematode, we have analyzed multidrug resistant Teladorsagia circumcincta, a major parasite of sheep, as a model for analysis of resistance selection. We introgressed a field-derived multiresistant genotype into a partially inbred susceptible genetic background (through repeated backcrossing and drug selection) and performed genome-wide scans in the backcross progeny and drug-selected F2 populations to identify the major genes responsible for the multidrug resistance. We identified variation linking candidate resistance genes to each drug class. Putative mechanisms included target site polymorphism, changes in likely regulatory regions and copy number variation in efflux transporters. This work elucidates the genetic architecture of multiple anthelmintic resistance in a parasitic nematode for the first time and establishes a framework for future studies of anthelmintic resistance in nematode parasites of humans.

Novel Findings in HIV, Immune Reconstitution Disease and Strongyloides stercoralis Infection.

We report the successful treatment of an HIV-infected patient with progressive strongyloidiasis as a component of immune reconstitution disease and a review of the literature on this topic. In our experience, pre- and post-antiretroviral therapy intestinal biopsies support a novel mechanism of immune reconstitution disease to Strongyloides stercoralis. We conclude that extended, dual antihelminthic therapy and temporary discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy may be effective in similar patients.

Human lagochilascariasis-A rare helminthic disease.

Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a helminth of the order Ascaroidea, genus Lagochilascaris that comprises 6 species, among which only Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909, is implicated in the human form of the disease. It is remarkable that the majority of cases of human lagochilascariasis in the Americas have been reported in Brazil. The natural definitive hosts of this parasite seem to be wild felines and canines. Lagochilascariasis is mostly a chronic human disease that can persist for several years, in which the parasite burrows into the subcutaneous tissues of the neck, paranasal sinuses, and mastoid. L. minor exhibits remarkable ability to migrate through the tissues of its hosts, destroying even bone tissue. Fatal cases have been described in which the parasite was found in the lungs or central nervous system. Treatment is often palliative, with recurrence of lesions. This paper summarizes the main features of the disease and its etiologic agent, including prevalence, life cycle, clinical course, and treatment.