PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Practice Guidelines as Topic - Top 30 Publications

Recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of a Third Dose of Mumps Virus-Containing Vaccine in Persons at Increased Risk for Mumps During an Outbreak.

A substantial increase in the number of mumps outbreaks and outbreak-associated cases has occurred in the United States since late 2015 (1,2). To address this public health problem, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviewed the available evidence and determined that a third dose of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe and effective at preventing mumps. During its October 2017 meeting, ACIP recommended a third dose of a mumps virus-containing vaccine* for persons previously vaccinated with 2 doses who are identified by public health authorities as being part of a group or population at increased risk for acquiring mumps because of an outbreak. The purpose of the recommendation is to improve protection of persons in outbreak settings against mumps disease and mumps-related complications. This recommendation supplements the existing ACIP recommendations for mumps vaccination (3).

Update: Providing Quality Family Planning Services - Recommendations from CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs, 2017.

In April 2014, CDC published "Providing Quality Family Planning Services: Recommendations of CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs" (QFP), which describes the scope of services that should be offered in a family planning visit and how to provide those services (e.g., periodicity of screening, which persons are in need of services, etc.) (1). The sections in QFP include the following: Determining the Client's Need for Services; Contraceptive Services; Pregnancy Testing and Counseling; Clients Who Want to Become Pregnant; Basic Infertility Services; Preconception Health Services; Sexually Transmitted Disease Services; and Related Preventive Health Services. In addition, the QFP includes an appendix entitled Screening Services for Which Evidence Does Not Support Screening.

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 729: Importance of Social Determinants of Health and Cultural Awareness in the Delivery of Reproductive Health Care.

Awareness of the broader contexts that influence health supports respectful, patient-centered care that incorporates lived experiences, optimizes health outcomes, improves communication, and can help reduce health and health care inequities. Although there is little doubt that genetics and lifestyle play an important role in shaping the overall health of individuals, interdisciplinary researchers have demonstrated how the conditions in the environment in which people are born, live, work, and age, play equally as important a role in shaping health outcomes. These factors, referred to as social determinants of health, are shaped by historical, social, political, and economic forces and help explain the relationship between environmental conditions and individual health. Recognizing the importance of social determinants of health can help obstetrician-gynecologists and other health care providers better understand patients, effectively communicate about health-related conditions and behavior, and improve health outcomes.

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 728: Müllerian Agenesis: Diagnosis, Management, And Treatment.

Müllerian agenesis, also referred to as müllerian aplasia, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, or vaginal agenesis, has an incidence of 1 per 4,500-5,000 females. Müllerian agenesis is caused by embryologic underdevelopment of the müllerian duct, with resultant agenesis or atresia of the vagina, uterus, or both. Patients with müllerian agenesis usually are identified when they are evaluated for primary amenorrhea with otherwise typical growth and pubertal development. The most important steps in the effective management of müllerian agenesis are correct diagnosis of the underlying condition, evaluation for associated congenital anomalies, and psychosocial counseling in addition to treatment or intervention to address the functional effects of genital anomalies. The psychologic effect of the diagnosis of müllerian agenesis should not be underestimated. All patients with müllerian agenesis should be offered counseling and encouraged to connect with peer support groups. Future options for having children should be addressed with patients: options include adoption and gestational surrogacy. Assisted reproductive techniques with use of a gestational carrier (surrogate) have been shown to be successful for women with müllerian agenesis. Nonsurgical vaginal elongation by dilation should be the first-line approach. When well-counseled and emotionally prepared, almost all patients (90-96%) will be able to achieve anatomic and functional success by primary vaginal dilation. In cases in which surgical intervention is required, referrals to centers with expertise in this area should be considered because few surgeons have extensive experience in construction of the neovagina and surgery by a trained surgeon offers the best opportunity for a successful result.

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 189: Nausea And Vomiting Of Pregnancy.

Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy is a common condition that affects the health of a pregnant woman and her fetus. It can diminish a woman's quality of life and also significantly contributes to health care costs and time lost from work (1, 2). Because morning sickness is common in early pregnancy, the presence of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy may be minimized by obstetricians, other obstetric care providers, and pregnant women and, thus, undertreated (1). Furthermore, some women do not seek treatment because of concerns about the safety of medications (3). Once nausea and vomiting of pregnancy progresses, it can become more difficult to control symptoms. Treatment in the early stages may prevent more serious complications, including hospitalization (4). Safe and effective treatments are available for more severe cases, and mild cases of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy may be resolved with lifestyle and dietary changes. The woman's perception of the severity of her symptoms plays a critical role in the decision of whether, when, and how to treat nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy should be distinguished from nausea and vomiting related to other causes. The purpose of this document is to review the best available evidence about the diagnosis and management of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 188: Prelabor Rupture of Membranes.

Preterm delivery occurs in approximately 12% of all births in the United States and is a major factor that contributes to perinatal morbidity and mortality (1, 2). Preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (also referred to as premature rupture of membranes) (PROM) complicates approximately 3% of all pregnancies in the United States (3). The optimal approach to clinical assessment and treatment of women with term and preterm PROM remains controversial. Management hinges on knowledge of gestational age and evaluation of the relative risks of delivery versus the risks of expectant management (eg, infection, abruptio placentae, and umbilical cord accident). The purpose of this document is to review the current understanding of this condition and to provide management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted outcome-based research when available. Additional guidelines on the basis of consensus and expert opinion also are presented.

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 729 Summary: Importance Of Social Determinants Of Health And Cultural Awareness In The Delivery Of Reproductive Health Care.

Awareness of the broader contexts that influence health supports respectful, patient-centered care that incorporates lived experiences, optimizes health outcomes, improves communication, and can help reduce health and health care inequities. Although there is little doubt that genetics and lifestyle play an important role in shaping the overall health of individuals, interdisciplinary researchers have demonstrated how the conditions in the environment in which people are born, live, work, and age, play equally as important a role in shaping health outcomes. These factors, referred to as social determinants of health, are shaped by historical, social, political, and economic forces and help explain the relationship between environmental conditions and individual health. Recognizing the importance of social determinants of health can help obstetrician-gynecologists and other health care providers better understand patients, effectively communicate about health-related conditions and behavior, and improve health outcomes.

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 728 Summary: Müllerian Agenesis: Diagnosis, Management, And Treatment.

Müllerian agenesis, also referred to as müllerian aplasia, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, or vaginal agenesis, has an incidence of 1 per 4,500-5,000 females. Müllerian agenesis is cau0073ed by embryologic underdevelopment of the müllerian duct, with resultant agenesis or atresia of the vagina, uterus, or both. Patients with müllerian agenesis usually are identified when they are evaluated for primary amenorrhea with otherwise typical growth and pubertal development. The most important steps in the effective management of müllerian agenesis are correct diagnosis of the underlying condition, evaluation for associated congenital anomalies, and psychosocial counseling in addition to treatment or intervention to address the functional effects of genital anomalies. The psychologic effect of the diagnosis of müllerian agenesis should not be underestimated. All patients with müllerian agenesis should be offered counseling and encouraged to connect with peer support groups. Future options for having children should be addressed with patients: options include adoption and gestational surrogacy. Assisted reproductive techniques with use of a gestational carrier (surrogate) have been shown to be successful for women with müllerian agenesis. Nonsurgical vaginal elongation by dilation should be the first-line approach. When well-counseled and emotionally prepared, almost all patients (90-96%) will be able to achieve anatomic and functional success by primary vaginal dilation. In cases in which surgical intervention is required, referrals to centers with expertise in this area should be considered because few surgeons have extensive experience in construction of the neovagina and surgery by a trained surgeon offers the best opportunity for a successful result.

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 727 Summary: Cascade Testing: Testing Women For Known Hereditary Genetic Mutations Associated With Cancer.

"Cascade testing" refers to the performance of genetic counseling and testing in blood relatives of individuals who have been identified with specific genetic mutations. Testing protocols and other interventions may save lives and improve health and quality of life for these family members. Obstetrician-gynecologists should know who is eligible for cascade testing and should use all available resources to ensure that cascade testing is offered and occurs in a timely manner. Despite the clear health benefits for specific populations and individuals, obstetrician-gynecologists should be aware of the potential barriers to cascade testing and should know which options can help patients overcome those barriers. Such barriers, however, may be overcome with health care provider awareness and participation in local and state initiatives to improve implementation of cascade testing. Resources (available within federal and state agencies, professional societies, and in advocacy and community groups) are critical to the successful implementation of cascade testing. This Committee Opinion focuses specifically on cascade testing and the role of the obstetrician-gynecologist in clinical and public health efforts to increase identification of women with hereditary cancer syndromes.

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 189 Summary: Nausea And Vomiting Of Pregnancy.

Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy is a common condition that affects the health of a pregnant woman and her fetus. It can diminish a woman's quality of life and also significantly contributes to health care costs and time lost from work (1, 2). Because morning sickness is common in early pregnancy, the presence of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy may be minimized by obstetricians, other obstetric care providers, and pregnant women and, thus, undertreated (1). Furthermore, some women do not seek treatment because of concerns about the safety of medications (3). Once nausea and vomiting of pregnancy progresses, it can become more difficult to control symptoms. Treatment in the early stages may prevent more serious complications, including hospitalization (4). Safe and effective treatments are available for more severe cases, and mild cases of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy may be resolved with lifestyle and dietary changes. The woman's perception of the severity of her symptoms plays a critical role in the decision of whether, when, and how to treat nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy should be distinguished from nausea and vomiting related to other causes. The purpose of this document is to review the best available evidence about the diagnosis and management of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 188 Summary: Prelabor Rupture of Membranes.

Preterm delivery occurs in approximately 12% of all births in the United States and is a major factor that contributes to perinatal morbidity and mortality (1, 2). Preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (also referred to as premature rupture of membranes) (PROM) complicates approximately 3% of all pregnancies in the United States (3). The optimal approach to clinical assessment and treatment of women with term and preterm PROM remains controversial. Management hinges on knowledge of gestational age and evaluation of the relative risks of delivery versus the risks of expectant management (eg, infection, abruptio placentae, and umbilical cord accident). The purpose of this document is to review the current understanding of this condition and to provide management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted outcome-based research when available. Additional guidelines on the basis of consensus and expert opinion also are presented.

Value of Implementation of Strategies to Increase the Adherence of Health Professionals and Cancer Survivors to Guideline-Based Physical Exercise.

To increase the adherence of health professionals and cancer survivors to evidence-based physical exercise, effective implementation strategies (ISTs) are required.

Contemporary risk model for inhospital major bleeding for patients with acute myocardial infarction: The acute coronary treatment and intervention outcomes network (ACTION) registry®-Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)®.

Major bleeding is a frequent complication for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

Active Seizures: Guidelines for treatment of prolonged seizures in children and adults.

Defining a global research and policy agenda for betel quid and areca nut.

Betel quid and areca nut are known risk factors for many oral and oesophageal cancers, and their use is highly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region. Additionally, betel quid and areca nut are associated with health effects on the cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, metabolic, respiratory, and reproductive systems. Unlike tobacco, for which the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provides evidence-based policies for reducing tobacco use, no global policy exists for the control of betel quid and areca nut use. Multidisciplinary research is needed to address this neglected global public health emergency and to mobilise efforts to control betel quid and areca nut use. In addition, future research is needed to advance our understanding of the basic biology, mechanisms, and epidemiology of betel quid and areca nut use, to advance possible prevention and cessation programmes for betel quid and areca nut users, and to design evidence-based screening and early diagnosis programmes to address the growing burden of cancers that are associated with use.

European position statement on lung cancer screening.

Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can save lives. This European Union (EU) position statement presents the available evidence and the major issues that need to be addressed to ensure the successful implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening in Europe. This statement identified specific actions required by the European lung cancer screening community to adopt before the implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening. This position statement recommends the following actions: a risk stratification approach should be used for future lung cancer low-dose CT programmes; that individuals who enter screening programmes should be provided with information on the benefits and harms of screening, and smoking cessation should be offered to all current smokers; that management of detected solid nodules should use semi-automatically measured volume and volume-doubling time; that national quality assurance boards should be set up to oversee technical standards; that a lung nodule management pathway should be established and incorporated into clinical practice with a tailored screening approach; that non-calcified baseline lung nodules greater than 300 mm3, and new lung nodules greater than 200 mm3, should be managed in multidisciplinary teams according to this EU position statement recommendations to ensure that patients receive the most appropriate treatment; and planning for implementation of low-dose CT screening should start throughout Europe as soon as possible. European countries need to set a timeline for implementing lung cancer screening.

Current Care Guideline: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of visual impairment in developed countries. Several improvements in the visualization of posterior segment of the eye together with the introduction of intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment have revolutionized the prognosis of the wet form of AMD (wAMD). Increasing incidence of wAMD together with the limited resources of the healthcare systems pose challenges for the provision and development of care. In context of these current aspects, we aim to set evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with wAMD.

Update on Current Care Guideline: Periodontitis.

Periodontitis is common in the adult Finnish population. Also the prevalence of peri-implant diseases increases. As symptoms are rare, affected patients seldom seek dental care but require attention through the health care system. A careful periodontal screening, including risk assessment, is essential. Individual brushing and interdental cleaning instructions, as well as tobacco counseling, are important in preventing and treating these diseases, Early signs of periodontitis are indication for treatment, including necessary maintenance visits, preventing the severe periodontitis and its harmful consequences for the patient's dentition and general health.

Revisiting Naloxone: A different take on overdose guidelines from Lee County, Fla.

Diagnostic Testing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults.

A Practical Approach to Avoiding Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Psychoactive Medications.

Drugs that act on mental state, generally termed "psychoactive agents," are among the most widely used medications in medicine. Psychoactive agents can affect the cardiovascular system and must be used carefully to avoid negative cardiovascular consequences. In the present article we review the potential adverse cardiovascular consequences of psychoactive medications and provide suggestions for practical approaches to avoiding them. We consider adverse reactions in terms of: (1) arrhythmias (particularly acquired long QT syndrome); (2) blood pressure; (3) ventricular function; (4) effect on risk factors; (5) teratogenicity; and (6) drug interactions. Minimizing QT liability requires a consideration of patient-specific risk factors and the risk profile of drugs available to treat the psychiatric condition. Drugs with QT-prolonging properties can be used safely, provided that appropriate precautions are taken. Fear of QT-prolongation should not deprive patients of needed psychiatric therapy. For example, one large study reported substantially increased all-cause mortality/hospitalization, death/depression-hospitalization, and death/arrhythmia-hospitalization in patients for whom citalopram dosage was reduced over QT-concerns after the Food and Drug Administration Black Box Warning. In general, attention to drug-specific cardiac adverse effect risks is needed, along with appropriate patient-related drug selection and follow-up, to detect adverse reactions early and adjust accordingly. Treatment should begin with low doses, followed by careful dose titration and adjustment of drug regimen according to clinical responses. Particular care is needed to minimize negative consequences on cardiovascular/metabolic risk profile, which might have very detrimental long-term effects on cardiovascular health. It is crucial that fear of cardiovascular adverse effects not deprive patients of appropriate psychoactive drug-therapy.

Physicians are not well informed about the new guidelines for the treatment of acute stroke.

Treatment of cerebrovascular disease has advanced rapidly in the last two decades. Recent data has added challenges to the treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase.

Implementation of a Guideline to Decrease Use of Acid-Suppressing Medications in the NICU.

Acid-suppressing medications are used extensively in term and preterm newborns despite limited efficacy data and increasing evidence for potential harm. We sought to reduce nonindicated use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) in our level III/IV NICU by developing and implementing a guideline for their use. Our specific aim was to reduce prescriptions among infants <1 month corrected age from a baseline of 7.5 to 4 per month by December 2016.

The 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline for High Blood Pressure.

Guideline Recommendations for Obesity Management.

It is an obligation for all health care providers to participate in obesity management. This article discusses obesity guidelines from The Obesity Society; the Endocrine Society; and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. It reviews and compares findings and recommendations across these guidelines, identifies areas of controversy and concordance, and suggests how primary care practices may make use of the most appropriate recommendations for their circumstances.

Leukopenia - A Diagnostic Guideline for the Clinical Routine.

Reasons for leukopenia can be numerous. To get close to the diagnosis it's always useful to check previous blood counts of the patient to get a feeling for the dynamic development of the leukopenia. Furthermore, it's important to check the red blood cell count and platelet count as well; a bi- or a pancytopenia usually implies an insufficient production in the bone marrow. Nevertheless, a manual counted peripheral blood smear is an essential step towards the right diagnosis in leukopenia: Beside cell counts of the single subgroups of leucocytes it also provides information on potential causes such as dysplasia.Leukopenia can be life-threatening for the patient especially if the patient presents with an agranulocytosis and fever: In this case admission is mandatory and the patient has to be treated immediately with broad-spectrum antibiotics to reduce mortality.

Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation and Concordance With the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines: Findings From ORBIT-AF (Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation).

It is unclear how frequently patients with atrial fibrillation receive guideline-concordant (GC) care and whether guideline concordance is associated with improved outcomes.

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Diagnosis and Management: High-Resolution Chest Computed Tomography, Transbronchial Lung Biopsy, and Pleural Disease Management. An Official American Thoracic Society/Japanese Respiratory Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

Recommendations regarding key aspects related to the diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) were recently published. We now provide additional recommendations regarding four specific questions related to the diagnosis of LAM and management of pneumothoraces in patients with LAM.

Treatment guidelines and early loss from care for people living with HIV in Cape Town, South Africa: A retrospective cohort study.

South Africa has undergone multiple expansions in antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility from an initial CD4+ threshold of ≤200 cells/μl to providing ART for all people living with HIV (PLWH) as of September 2016. We evaluated the association of programmatic changes in ART eligibility with loss from care, both prior to ART initiation and within the first 16 weeks of starting treatment, during a period of programmatic expansion to ART treatment at CD4+ ≤ 350 cells/μl.

Effects of Guideline and Formulary Changes on Statin Prescribing in the Veterans Affairs.

To compare the effects of two sequential policy changes-the addition of a high-potency statin to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) formulary and the release of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol guidelines-on VA provider prescribing.