PubTransformer

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Virus Diseases - Top 30 Publications

Human papillomavirus vaccines: WHO position paper, May 2017.

Progress towards measles elimination – African Region, 2013–2016.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening Among Pregnant Women and Care of Infants of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen-Positive Mothers - Guam, 2014.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic among adults in the U.S. territory of Guam (1,2). Perinatal HBV transmission, which occurs at birth from an infected mother to her newborn infant, is a major mode of HBV transmission and maintains HBV endemicity (3). Approximately 90% of HBV-infected infants will develop chronic HBV infection, and approximately 25% of those will die prematurely from liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma (4,5). Since 1988, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that all pregnant women be screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), an indicator of HBV infection, and that infants of women who screen positive (HBsAg-positive women) receive postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) (hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immunoglobulin [HBIG]). When received within 12 hours of birth, PEP is 85%-95% effective in preventing perinatal HBV transmission (5,6). Hepatitis B vaccine provides long-term active immunity to HBV infection and HBIG provides short-term passive immunity to HBV infection until the infant responds to the vaccine (5). Hepatitis B vaccine was introduced into the routine universal infant vaccination schedule in Guam in 1988 (1).

Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Women Giving Birth - Tennessee and United States, 2009-2014.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects an estimated 3.5 million persons in the United States (1), making it the most common bloodborne infection in the country. Recent surveillance data showed increased rates of HCV infection among adolescents and adults who are predominantly white, live in nonurban areas, and have a history of injection drug use.* U.S. birth certificate data were used to analyze trends and geographic variations in rates of HCV infection among women giving birth during 2009-2014. Birth certificates from Tennessee were used to examine individual characteristics and outcomes associated with HCV infection, using a multivariable model to calculate adjusted odds of HCV-related diagnosis in pregnancy among women with live births. During 2009-2014, HCV infection present at the time of delivery among pregnant women from states reporting HCV on the birth certificate increased 89%, from 1.8 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births. The highest infection rate in 2014 (22.6 per 1,000 live births) was in West Virginia; the rate in Tennessee was 10.1. In adjusted analyses of Tennessee births, the odds of HCV infection were approximately threefold higher among women residing in rural counties than among those in large urban counties, 4.5-fold higher among women who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, and nearly 17-fold higher among women with concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HCV infection among pregnant women is an increasing and potentially modifiable threat to maternal and child health. Clinicians and public health officials should consider individual and population-level opportunities for prevention and risk mitigation.

State HCV Incidence and Policies Related to HCV Preventive and Treatment Services for Persons Who Inject Drugs - United States, 2015-2016.

Hepatitis C is associated with more deaths in the United States than 60 other infectious diseases reported to CDC combined. Despite curative hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies and known preventive measures to interrupt transmission, new HCV infections have increased in recent years (1,2). Injection drug use is the primary risk factor for new HCV infections (2). One potential strategy to decrease the prevalence of HCV is to create and strengthen public health laws and policies aimed specifically at reducing transmission risks among persons who inject drugs. To evaluate factors affecting access to HCV preventive and treatment services, CDC assessed state laws governing access to safe injection equipment and Medicaid policies related to sobriety requirements for approval of HCV treatment for persons who inject drugs. Acute HCV incidence rates were obtained from CDC's National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS). States were categorized based on analysis of laws related to access to clean needles and syringes and Medicaid HCV treatment policies associated with sobriety requirements. In 2015, HCV incidence remained high in the United States, with rates in 17 states exceeding the national average. Three states were determined to have state laws and Medicaid policies capable of comprehensively preventing and treating HCV among persons who inject drugs. Opportunities exist for states to adopt laws and policies that could help increase access to HCV preventive and treatment services reducing the number of persons at risk for HCV transmission and disease.

Zika Virus Vaccines - A Full Field and Looking for the Closers.

Progress Toward Measles Elimination - African Region, 2013-2016.

In 2011, the 46 World Health Organization (WHO) African Region (AFR) member states established a goal of measles elimination* by 2020, by achieving 1) ≥95% coverage of their target populations with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) at national and district levels; 2) ≥95% coverage with measles-containing vaccine (MCV) per district during supplemental immunization activities (SIAs); and 3) confirmed measles incidence of <1 case per 1 million population in all countries (1). Two key surveillance performance indicator targets include 1) investigating ≥2 cases of nonmeasles febrile rash illness per 100,000 population annually, and 2) obtaining a blood specimen from ≥1 suspected measles case in ≥80% of districts annually (2). This report updates the previous report (3) and describes progress toward measles elimination in AFR during 2013-2016. Estimated regional MCV1 coverage(†) increased from 71% in 2013 to 74% in 2015.(§) Seven (15%) countries achieved ≥95% MCV1 coverage in 2015.(¶) The number of countries providing a routine second MCV dose (MCV2) increased from 11 (24%) in 2013 to 23 (49%) in 2015. Forty-one (79%) of 52 SIAs** during 2013-2016 reported ≥95% coverage. Both surveillance targets were met in 19 (40%) countries in 2016. Confirmed measles incidence in AFR decreased from 76.3 per 1 million population to 27.9 during 2013-2016. To eliminate measles by 2020, AFR countries and partners need to 1) achieve ≥95% 2-dose MCV coverage through improved immunization services, including second dose (MCV2) introduction; 2) improve SIA quality by preparing 12-15 months in advance, and using readiness, intra-SIA, and post-SIA assessment tools; 3) fully implement elimination-standard surveillance(††); 4) conduct annual district-level risk assessments; and 5) establish national committees and a regional commission for the verification of measles elimination.

Addressing a Yellow Fever Vaccine Shortage - United States, 2016-2017.

Recent manufacturing problems resulted in a shortage of the only U.S.-licensed yellow fever vaccine. This shortage is expected to lead to a complete depletion of yellow fever vaccine available for the immunization of U.S. travelers by mid-2017. CDC, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Sanofi Pasteur are collaborating to ensure a continuous yellow fever vaccine supply in the United States. As part of this collaboration, Sanofi Pasteur submitted an expanded access investigational new drug (eIND) application to FDA in September 2016 to allow for the importation and use of an alternative yellow fever vaccine manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur France, with safety and efficacy comparable to the U.S.-licensed vaccine; the eIND was accepted by FDA in October 2016. The implementation of this eIND protocol included developing a systematic process for selecting a limited number of clinic sites to provide the vaccine. CDC and Sanofi Pasteur will continue to communicate with the public and other stakeholders, and CDC will provide a list of locations that will be administering the replacement vaccine at a later date.

Abnormal Vaginal Pap Test After Hysterectomy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women.

To evaluate the prevalence of abnormal vaginal cytology and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) and vaginal cancer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women with no history of abnormal cytologic screening who had a hysterectomy for conditions other than cervical dysplasia and cancer; and to explore the risk factors associated with VAIN and vaginal cancer.

Autophagy induction regulates influenza virus replication in a time-dependent manner.

Autophagy plays a key role in host defence responses against microbial infections by promoting degradation of pathogens and participating in acquired immunity. The interaction between autophagy and viruses is complex, and this pathway is hijacked by several viruses. Influenza virus (IV) interferes with autophagy through its replication and increases the accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking lysosome fusion. Thus, autophagy could be an effective area for antiviral research.

Genetic analysis of human parainfluenza virus type 3 obtained in Croatia, 2011-2015.

This study investigated the HPIV3 circulating strains in Croatia and whether the other parts of HPIV3 genome (F gene and HN 582 nucleotides fragment) could be equally suitable for genetic and phylogenetic analysis.

Measles vaccines: WHO position paper – April 2017.

Antiretroviral therapy containing raltegravir in HIV-infected pregnant women: Systematic review.

The risk of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV increases in pregnant women diagnosed late in pregnancy. Some experts suggest that the use of raltegravir (RAL), as part of the antiretroviral treatment in these pregnant women, could reduce the risk of MTCT, since RAL can quickly decrease the viral load.

Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions involving antiretroviral drugs in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Antiretroviral agents (ARVs) have a high potential for drug interactions. However, the prevalence and risk factors for clinically significant drug-drug interactions (CSDDIs) with ARVs from Latin American countries is unknown.

The clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: update 2009-2014.

To update information about drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS.

Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease in adult patients, a clinical perspective.

Among the clinical manifestations which may occur in HIV/AIDS patients, oral lesions are relevant because there are easily accessible and usually the diagnosis is made through clinical features. Some oral manifestations are strongly related with HIV/AIDS patients indicating infection and progression to AIDS and also allow monitoring the success or failure of using antiretroviral therapy. The massive introduction of antiretroviral therapy has changed the morbidity and mortality, frequency, type of clinical manifestation and the timing of the classic opportunistic complications. The aim of this review is to provide an updated of the classical clinical features of the most frequent and relevant HIV/AIDS oral manifestations, considering the fundamental clinical features for their diagnosis.

Late diagnosis and advanced disease of HIV in adult patients from a Peruvian social security hospital.

The delayed HIV diagnosis with CD4 count is a public health problem.

HIV/AIDS infection in children and adolescents: Chilean cohort 1987-2014.

The present document describes the Cohort of HIV/AIDS children detected in Chile from 1987 to August 2014 and the effectiveness of the Protocol for Prevention of Vertical Transmission (PPVT) of HIV infection. Of the 375 HIV infected children enrolled since 1987 to August 2014, 245 of them are still in pediatric control. From the analysis of the Cohort is inferred that: a) it has observed an improvement in the detection of the HIV infected child, in number and precocious time; b) the majority of these children continue to be detected by clinic symptoms and signs (mainly unspecific and infectious manifestations); c) the ARVT use has meant a clinic and immunologic improvement with diminution of the infections, principally opportunistic infections, with a better life quality, a prolongation of survival and a diminution of lethality; d) as more survival has been produced, cancer has begun to be detected, a very infrequent complication observed in them before the ARVT use. The PPVT started in 1995, and was reinforced in 2005 with the "Joint Norm of HIV and Syphilis Vertical Transmission Prevention" (MINSAL), both have meant a diminution of the HIV vertical transmission from > 35% (before 1995) to < 2% nowadays in the mother-child binomial; also have permitted a second generation of HIV exposed children born without infection. In spite this PPVT, still HIV infected child continue to be detected which imply failures in some points of the health system.

Evolution of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of adults patients belonging to the national program at start of antiretroviral therapy in the Chilean AIDS Cohort, 2001-2015.

Chilean AIDS Cohort is the oldest and extensive in Latin America and one of most numerous and with longer follow up time to international level. Records information from 14,873 patients out of approximately 22,000 in antiretroviral therapy in the public system and its results have allowed to know the national reality and have contributed to the adoption of public policies.

Hepatitis B During Pregnancy in Endemic Areas: Screening, Treatment, and Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission.

The proper management of pregnant women infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is necessary to prevent maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality and to protect the baby from HBV infection. In the majority of cases, vertical transmission can be prevented with a universal screening program, HBV vaccine immunoprophylaxis, and administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIg) for babies born to mothers with HBV. However, in mothers with a high viral load (>200,000 or >1,000,000 IU/ml, depending on the guideline), the chance of immunoprophylaxis failure remains high. The standard recommendation is to give an antiviral agent during the third trimester in these patients. US FDA pregnancy category B agents such as tenofovir and telbivudine are allowed through all trimesters of pregnancy. Breastfeeding for patients who receive antiviral agents can be allowed after a risk-benefit discussion with the patient.

Eliminate Yellow fever Epidemics (EYE): a global strategy, 2017–2026.

Community Mitigation Guidelines to Prevent Pandemic Influenza - United States, 2017.

When a novel influenza A virus with pandemic potential emerges, nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) often are the most readily available interventions to help slow transmission of the virus in communities, which is especially important before a pandemic vaccine becomes widely available. NPIs, also known as community mitigation measures, are actions that persons and communities can take to help slow the spread of respiratory virus infections, including seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses.These guidelines replace the 2007 Interim Pre-pandemic Planning Guidance: Community Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Mitigation in the United States - Early, Targeted, Layered Use of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/11425). Several elements remain unchanged from the 2007 guidance, which described recommended NPIs and the supporting rationale and key concepts for the use of these interventions during influenza pandemics. NPIs can be phased in, or layered, on the basis of pandemic severity and local transmission patterns over time. Categories of NPIs include personal protective measures for everyday use (e.g., voluntary home isolation of ill persons, respiratory etiquette, and hand hygiene); personal protective measures reserved for influenza pandemics (e.g., voluntary home quarantine of exposed household members and use of face masks in community settings when ill); community measures aimed at increasing social distancing (e.g., school closures and dismissals, social distancing in workplaces, and postponing or cancelling mass gatherings); and environmental measures (e.g., routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces).Several new elements have been incorporated into the 2017 guidelines. First, to support updated recommendations on the use of NPIs, the latest scientific evidence available since the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 pandemic has been added. Second, a summary of lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response is presented to underscore the importance of broad and flexible prepandemic planning. Third, a new section on community engagement has been included to highlight that the timely and effective use of NPIs depends on community acceptance and active participation. Fourth, to provide new or updated pandemic assessment and planning tools, the novel influenza virus pandemic intervals tool, the Influenza Risk Assessment Tool, the Pandemic Severity Assessment Framework, and a set of prepandemic planning scenarios are described. Finally, to facilitate implementation of the updated guidelines and to assist states and localities with prepandemic planning and decision-making, this report links to six supplemental prepandemic NPI planning guides for different community settings that are available online (https://www.cdc.gov/nonpharmaceutical-interventions).

Increase in human immunodeficiency virus 1 diversity and detection of various subtypes and recombinants in north-eastern Brazil.

Diverse human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtypes and circulating recombinant forms are found in Brazil. The majority of HIV-1 molecular epidemiological studies in Brazil have been conducted in the southern and south-eastern regions of the country, although several recent studies in the north-eastern region have addressed this issue. The objective of this study was to molecularly characterize HIV-1 circulating in Pernambuco, north-eastern Brazil.

Development of Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Porcine Circovirus Type 2.

Porcine circovirus virus type II (PCV2) is the etiology of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), porcine dermatitis, nephropathy syndrome (PDNS), and necrotizing pneumonia. Rapid diagnosis tool for detection of PCV2 plays an important role in the disease control and eradication program. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays using a real-time fluorescent detection (PCV2 real-time RPA assay) and RPA combined with lateral flow dipstick (PCV2 RPA LFD assay) were developed targeting the PCV2 ORF2 gene. The results showed that the sensitivity of the PCV2 real-time RPA assay was 10(2) copies per reaction within 20 min at 37°C and the PCV2 RPA LFD assay had a detection limit of 10(2) copies per reaction in less than 20 min at 37°C. Both assays were highly specific for PCV2, with no cross-reactions with porcine circovirus virus type 1, foot-and-mouth disease virus, pseudorabies virus, porcine parvovirus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and classical swine fever virus. Therefore, the RPA assays provide a novel alternative for simple, sensitive, and specific identification of PCV2.

TAM Receptors Are Not Required for Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk (TAM) receptors are candidate entry receptors for infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging flavivirus of global public health concern. To investigate the requirement of TAM receptors for ZIKV infection, we used several routes of viral inoculation and compared viral replication in wild-type versus Axl(-/-), Mertk(-/-), Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-), and Axl(-/-)Tyro3(-/-) mice in various organs. Pregnant and non-pregnant mice treated with interferon-α-receptor (IFNAR)-blocking (MAR1-5A3) antibody and infected subcutaneously with ZIKV showed no reliance on TAMs for infection. In the absence of IFNAR-blocking antibody, adult female mice challenged intravaginally with ZIKV showed no difference in mucosal viral titers. Similarly, in young mice that were infected with ZIKV intracranially or intraperitoneally, ZIKV replication occurred in the absence of TAM receptors, and no differences in cell tropism were observed. These findings indicate that, in mice, TAM receptors are not required for ZIKV entry and infection.

Case 12-2017 - A 34-Year-Old Man with Nephropathy.

Impact of body condition on influenza A virus infection dynamics in mallards following a secondary exposure.

Migratory waterfowl are often viewed as vehicles for the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), with mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) implicated as particularly important reservoir hosts. The physical demands and energetic costs of migration have been shown to influence birds' body condition; poorer body condition may suppress immune function and affect the course of IAV infection. Our study evaluated the impact of body condition on immune function and viral shedding dynamics in mallards naturally exposed to an H9 IAV, and then secondarily exposed to an H4N6 IAV. Mallards were divided into three treatment groups of 10 birds per group, with each bird's body condition manipulated as a function of body weight by restricting food availability to achieve either a -10%, -20%, or control body weight class. We found that mallards exhibit moderate heterosubtypic immunity against an H4N6 IAV infection after an infection from an H9 IAV, and that body condition did not have an impact on shedding dynamics in response to a secondary exposure. Furthermore, body condition did not affect aspects of the innate and adaptive immune system, including the acute phase protein haptoglobin, heterophil/lymphocyte ratios, and antibody production. Contrary to recently proposed hypotheses and some experimental evidence, our data do not support relationships between body condition, infection and immunocompetence following a second exposure to IAV in mallards. Consequently, while annual migration may be a driver in the maintenance and spread of IAVs, the energetic demands of migration may not affect susceptibility in mallards.

Comorbidities of rheumatoid arthritis: Results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with the non-RA population. The 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), which assesses the general health status of populations in South Korea using interviews and basic health assessment, was analyzed retrospectively. Weighted prevalence and odds ratio (OR) of comorbidities were analyzed in patients with RA compared with the non-RA population. The overall weighted (n = 37,453,158) prevalence of RA was 1.5%. Patients with RA were older and more female predominant than subjects without RA. The prevalence of living in an urban area, college graduation, alcohol consumption and smoking was lower in patients with RA than non-RA. Patients with RA had more comorbidities including hypertension, dyslipidemia, myocardial infarction (MI) or angina, stoke, osteoarthritis, lung cancer, colon cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, asthma, diabetes, depression, thyroid disease and chronic kidney disease. After adjusting socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics, RA was associated with an increased prevalence of MI or angina (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.17-2.96, p = 0.009), pulmonary TB (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.24-3.09, p = 0.004), asthma (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.05-3.71, p = 0.036), thyroid disease (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.05-2.77), depression (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.47-3.85, p < 0.001) and hepatitis B (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.15-4.80, p = 0.020) compared with the non-RA population. Prevalence of solid cancer was not significantly associated with RA after adjustment.

Characterization of rotavirus infection in children with acute gastroenteritis in Bengo province, Northwestern Angola, prior to vaccine introduction.

Rotavirus group A (RVA) is considered the leading cause of pediatric diarrhea, responsible for the high burden of diarrheal diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite recent studies, the existent data are scarce for some African countries like Angola, a country with one of the highest RVA-related death estimates. The aim of this study was to determine the RVA detection rate and circulating genotypes in children less than five years of age with acute gastroenteritis attended at the Bengo General Hospital in Caxito, Bengo province, Angola, before vaccine introduction.

Clinical features of treatment-naive patients with hepatitis B virus infection: A community-based survey from high- and intermediate-hepatitis B endemicity regions in Southeast China.

The aim of study was to investigate the clinical features of treatment-naive patients in 2 regions with high- and intermediate-hepatitis B endemicity level in Southeast China and provide the baseline data for monitoring health or planning therapy.This study included 8207 cases of treatment-naive patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection from Yuhuan (YH, high-hepatitis B endemicity region) and Shaoxing (SX, intermediate-hepatitis B endemicity region) during 2014-2015. Clinical data were collected from the patients. Blood samples were kept for detecting hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B envelope antibody, hepatitis B surface antibody, hepatitis B core antibody, liver function, HBV deoxyribonucleic acid, and alpha-fetoprotein. All persons underwent B ultrasound to exclude liver cirrhosis or cancer.Of all 8207 HBsAg-positive patients, 52.9% patients were in the low-replication (LR) stage and 30.3% in the HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B (ENH) stage; 8.8% cases were in the ENH stage with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT). More male than female patients were in immune clearance (IC) or ENH stages with elevated ALT (10.4% vs 4.8%, 12.1% vs 5.3%, respectively, P < .05). The percentage of patients in IC and immune tolerant (IT) stages declined with increasing age, whereas the percentages of ENH with elevated ALT stage were highest in 40 to 60 years.The percentage of patients in IT and IC stages was higher in YH than in SX (9.4% vs 3.8%, 9.9% vs 4.2%, respectively, P < .05). More patients had HBVDNA≥10 IU/mL in YH than in SX (24.6% vs 16.0%, P < .05), and more male than female patients had HBVDNA≥10 IU/mL(24.5% vs 17.9%, P < .05).Clinical features varied in treatment-naive patients with HBV infection between different genders and regions. More attention should be paid to the surveillance and therapy of patients in YH especially male patients for the prevention and prognosis of hepatitis B.