PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.

Abstract Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.
PMID
Related Publications

Using open-access taxonomic and spatial information to create a comprehensive database for the study of mammalian and avian livestock and pet infections.

Infectious diseases and extinction risk in wild mammals.

Population biology of emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

The role of wildlife in emerging and re-emerging zoonoses.

Patterns of host specificity and transmission among parasites of wild primates.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Animals, Domestic

Keywords
Journal Title philosophical transactions of the royal society of london. series b, biological sciences
Publication Year Start
%A Cleaveland, S.; Laurenson, M. K.; Taylor, L. H.
%T Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
%J Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, vol. 356, no. 1411, pp. 991-999
%D 07/2001
%V 356
%N 1411
%M eng
%B Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.
%K Animal Diseases, Animals, Animals, Domestic, Databases, Factual, Host-Parasite Interactions, Humans, Mammals, Risk Factors, Zoonoses
%P 991
%L 999
%Y 10.1098/rstb.2001.0889
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2001......356..991C

@Article{Cleaveland2001,
author="Cleaveland, S.
and Laurenson, M. K.
and Taylor, L. H.",
title="Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.",
journal="Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences",
year="2001",
month="Jul",
day="29",
volume="356",
number="1411",
pages="991--999",
keywords="Animal Diseases",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Animals, Domestic",
keywords="Databases, Factual",
keywords="Host-Parasite Interactions",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Mammals",
keywords="Risk Factors",
keywords="Zoonoses",
abstract="Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6\%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3\%, carnivores 90.0\%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.",
issn="0962-8436",
doi="10.1098/rstb.2001.0889",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11516377",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
%A Cleaveland, S.
%A Laurenson, M. K.
%A Taylor, L. H.
%J Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
%D 2001
%8 Jul 29
%V 356
%N 1411
%@ 0962-8436
%G eng
%F Cleaveland2001
%X Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.
%K Animal Diseases
%K Animals
%K Animals, Domestic
%K Databases, Factual
%K Host-Parasite Interactions
%K Humans
%K Mammals
%K Risk Factors
%K Zoonoses
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2001.0889
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11516377
%P 991-999

PT Journal
AU Cleaveland, S
   Laurenson, MK
   Taylor, LH
TI Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
SO Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
JI Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PD Jul
PY 2001
BP 991
EP 999
VL 356
IS 1411
DI 10.1098/rstb.2001.0889
LA eng
DE Animal Diseases; Animals; Animals, Domestic; Databases, Factual; Host-Parasite Interactions; Humans; Mammals; Risk Factors; Zoonoses
AB Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.
ER

PMID- 11516377
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20010822
DCOM- 20011205
LR  - 20081120
IS  - 0962-8436 (Print)
IS  - 0962-8436 (Linking)
VI  - 356
IP  - 1411
DP  - 2001 Jul 29
TI  - Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host
      range and the risk of emergence.
PG  - 991-9
AB  - Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of
      fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic
      perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, 
      pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease
      emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens
      of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing 
      disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost
      pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so
      among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens
      able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion 
      of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and
      ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in
      livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and
      fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA
      viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect
      multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were
      also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is
      clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex
      multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health,
      livestock economies and wildlife.
FAU - Cleaveland, S
AU  - Cleaveland S
AD  - Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush,
      Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. [email protected]
FAU - Laurenson, M K
AU  - Laurenson MK
FAU - Taylor, L H
AU  - Taylor LH
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - England
TA  - Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
JT  - Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological
      sciences
JID - 7503623
SB  - IM
MH  - Animal Diseases/epidemiology/*microbiology/parasitology
MH  - Animals
MH  - *Animals, Domestic
MH  - Databases, Factual
MH  - Host-Parasite Interactions
MH  - Humans
MH  - Mammals
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Zoonoses/*epidemiology/*microbiology/parasitology
PMC - PMC1088494
OID - NLM: PMC1088494
EDAT- 2001/08/23 10:00
MHDA- 2002/01/05 10:01
CRDT- 2001/08/23 10:00
AID - 10.1098/rstb.2001.0889 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2001 Jul 29;356(1411):991-9.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Cleaveland, S.
AU  - Laurenson, M. K.
AU  - Taylor, L. H.
PY  - 2001/Jul/29
TI  - Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.
T2  - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
JO  - Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
SP  - 991
EP  - 999
VL  - 356
IS  - 1411
KW  - Animal Diseases
KW  - Animals
KW  - Animals, Domestic
KW  - Databases, Factual
KW  - Host-Parasite Interactions
KW  - Humans
KW  - Mammals
KW  - Risk Factors
KW  - Zoonoses
N2  - Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.
SN  - 0962-8436
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2001.0889
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11516377
ID  - Cleaveland2001
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Cleaveland2001</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2001</b:Year>
<b:Month>Jul</b:Month>
<b:Day>29</b:Day>
<b:PeriodicalName>Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>356</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>1411</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>991-999</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Cleaveland</b:Last><b:First>S</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Laurenson</b:Last><b:First>M</b:First><b:Middle>K</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Taylor</b:Last><b:First>L</b:First><b:Middle>H</b:Middle></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>Diseases of humans and their domestic mammals: pathogen characteristics, host range and the risk of emergence.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Pathogens that can be transmitted between different host species are of fundamental interest and importance from public health, conservation and economic perspectives, yet systematic quantification of these pathogens is lacking. Here, pathogen characteristics, host range and risk factors determining disease emergence were analysed by constructing a database of disease-causing pathogens of humans and domestic mammals. The database consisted of 1415 pathogens causing disease in humans, 616 in livestock and 374 in domestic carnivores. Multihost pathogens were very prevalent among human pathogens (61.6%) and even more so among domestic mammal pathogens (livestock 77.3%, carnivores 90.0%). Pathogens able to infect human, domestic and wildlife hosts contained a similar proportion of disease-causing pathogens for all three host groups. One hundred and ninety-six pathogens were associated with emerging diseases, 175 in humans, 29 in livestock and 12 in domestic carnivores. Across all these groups, helminths and fungi were relatively unlikely to emerge whereas viruses, particularly RNA viruses, were highly likely to emerge. The ability of a pathogen to infect multiple hosts, particularly hosts in other taxonomic orders or wildlife, were also risk factors for emergence in human and livestock pathogens. There is clearly a need to understand the dynamics of infectious diseases in complex multihost communities in order to mitigate disease threats to public health, livestock economies and wildlife.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>