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First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).

Abstract Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Cannibalism

Keywords
Journal Title american journal of primatology
Publication Year Start
%A Xiang, Zuo-Fu; Grueter, Cyril C.
%T First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).
%J American journal of primatology, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 249-254
%D 03/2007
%V 69
%N 3
%M eng
%B Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.
%K Animals, Animals, Wild, Behavior, Animal, Cannibalism, Colobinae, Female, Male
%P 249
%L 254
%Y 10.1002/ajp.20333
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2007.......69..249X

@Article{Xiang2007,
author="Xiang, Zuo-Fu
and Grueter, Cyril C.",
title="First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).",
journal="American journal of primatology",
year="2007",
month="Mar",
volume="69",
number="3",
pages="249--254",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Animals, Wild",
keywords="Behavior, Animal",
keywords="Cannibalism",
keywords="Colobinae",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Male",
abstract="Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.",
issn="0275-2565",
doi="10.1002/ajp.20333",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154386",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).
%A Xiang, Zuo-Fu
%A Grueter, Cyril C.
%J American journal of primatology
%D 2007
%8 Mar
%V 69
%N 3
%@ 0275-2565
%G eng
%F Xiang2007
%X Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.
%K Animals
%K Animals, Wild
%K Behavior, Animal
%K Cannibalism
%K Colobinae
%K Female
%K Male
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20333
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154386
%P 249-254

PT Journal
AU Xiang, Z
   Grueter, CC
TI First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).
SO American journal of primatology
JI Am. J. Primatol.
PD Mar
PY 2007
BP 249
EP 254
VL 69
IS 3
DI 10.1002/ajp.20333
LA eng
DE Animals; Animals, Wild; Behavior, Animal; Cannibalism; Colobinae; Female; Male
AB Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.
ER

PMID- 17154386
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20070205
DCOM- 20070524
IS  - 0275-2565 (Print)
IS  - 0275-2565 (Linking)
VI  - 69
IP  - 3
DP  - 2007 Mar
TI  - First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys
      (Rhinopithecus bieti).
PG  - 249-54
AB  - Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case 
      was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus
      roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys
      (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the
      killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey 
      (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed
      as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in 
      June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature
      proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual
      selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social
      pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for 
      comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to
      interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we
      describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the
      lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw 
      a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in
      snub-nosed monkeys.
CI  - (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
FAU - Xiang, Zuo-Fu
AU  - Xiang ZF
AD  - Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, P.R. 
      China. [email protected]
FAU - Grueter, Cyril C
AU  - Grueter CC
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Primatol
JT  - American journal of primatology
JID - 8108949
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Animals, Wild
MH  - Behavior, Animal/*physiology
MH  - *Cannibalism
MH  - Colobinae/*physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Male
EDAT- 2006/12/13 09:00
MHDA- 2007/05/26 09:00
CRDT- 2006/12/13 09:00
AID - 10.1002/ajp.20333 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Primatol. 2007 Mar;69(3):249-54.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Xiang, Zuo-Fu
AU  - Grueter, Cyril C.
PY  - 2007/Mar/
TI  - First direct evidence of infanticide and cannibalism in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).
T2  - Am. J. Primatol.
JO  - American journal of primatology
SP  - 249
EP  - 254
VL  - 69
IS  - 3
KW  - Animals
KW  - Animals, Wild
KW  - Behavior, Animal
KW  - Cannibalism
KW  - Colobinae
KW  - Female
KW  - Male
N2  - Although infanticide has been witnessed in many species of Colobinae, and a case was observed in a captive group of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana), observed cases of infanticide in wild snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus spp.) have not previously been recorded. Here we describe the killing of a 1-month-old infant by a male in a black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (R. bieti) group at Xiaochangdu in Tibet. The infanticidal attack was witnessed as part of a long-term observational study of ecology and behavior that began in June 2003. The male was observed killing and eating the infant. The literature proposes three main explanations for infanticide: two adaptive hypotheses (sexual selection and resource competition), and one nonadaptive hypothesis (social pathology). Individual cases of infanticide, such as this one, are important for comparative purposes, but when examined on their own they are difficult to interpret in relation to established theoretical frameworks. The cases we describe here show some consistency with the sexual selection hypothesis, but the lack of critical information (i.e., as to paternity) makes it impossible to draw a firm conclusion. This is also the first described case of cannibalism in snub-nosed monkeys.
SN  - 0275-2565
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20333
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17154386
ID  - Xiang2007
ER  - 
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