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Zoonoses in wildlife integrating ecology into management.

Abstract Zoonoses in wildlife not only play an important ecological role, but pose significant threats to the health of humans, domestic animals and some endangered species. More than two-thirds of emerging, or re-emerging, infectious diseases are thought to originate in wildlife. Despite this, co-ordinated surveillance schemes are rare, and most efforts at disease control operate at the level of crisis management. This review examines the pathways linking zoonoses in wildlife with infection in other hosts, using examples from a range of key zoonoses, including European bat lyssaviruses and bovine tuberculosis. Ecologically based control, including the management of conditions leading to spill-overs into target host populations, is likely to be more effective and sustainable than simple reductions in wildlife populations alone.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Ecosystem

Keywords
Journal Title advances in parasitology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 19289195
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20090623
LR  - 20090317
IS  - 0065-308X (Print)
IS  - 0065-308X (Linking)
VI  - 68
DP  - 2009
TI  - Zoonoses in wildlife integrating ecology into management.
PG  - 185-209
LID - 10.1016/S0065-308X(08)00608-8 [doi]
AB  - Zoonoses in wildlife not only play an important ecological role, but pose
      significant threats to the health of humans, domestic animals and some endangered
      species. More than two-thirds of emerging, or re-emerging, infectious diseases
      are thought to originate in wildlife. Despite this, co-ordinated surveillance
      schemes are rare, and most efforts at disease control operate at the level of
      crisis management. This review examines the pathways linking zoonoses in wildlife
      with infection in other hosts, using examples from a range of key zoonoses,
      including European bat lyssaviruses and bovine tuberculosis. Ecologically based
      control, including the management of conditions leading to spill-overs into
      target host populations, is likely to be more effective and sustainable than
      simple reductions in wildlife populations alone.
FAU - Mathews, Fiona
AU  - Mathews F
AD  - University of Exeter, Hatherly Laboratories, Exeter, United Kingdom.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - England
TA  - Adv Parasitol
JT  - Advances in parasitology
JID - 0370435
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Animals, Domestic/microbiology/parasitology
MH  - Animals, Wild/*microbiology/*parasitology
MH  - Disease Transmission, Infectious
MH  - *Ecosystem
MH  - Host-Pathogen Interactions
MH  - Humans
MH  - Zoonoses/transmission
RF  - 121
EDAT- 2009/03/18 09:00
MHDA- 2009/06/24 09:00
CRDT- 2009/03/18 09:00
PHST- 2009/03/18 09:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2009/03/18 09:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2009/06/24 09:00 [medline]
AID - S0065-308X(08)00608-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/S0065-308X(08)00608-8 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Adv Parasitol. 2009;68:185-209. doi: 10.1016/S0065-308X(08)00608-8.