PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations.

Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
PMID
Related Publications

New clinical data with metformin therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Initial metformin or sulphonylurea exposure and cancer occurrence among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Antidiabetic therapy--a new possibility in the complex therapy of cancer?.

Oral antidiabetic agents: current role in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Diabetes and cancer: a consensus report.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Diabetes Complications

Keywords
Journal Title orvosi hetilap
Publication Year Start
%A Rosta, Andr?s
%T [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].
%J Orvosi hetilap, vol. 152, no. 29, pp. 1144-1155
%D 07/2011
%V 152
%N 29
%M hun
%B Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
%K Adipokines, Age Factors, Animals, Cytokines, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Food Habits, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Hypoglycemic Agents, Incidence, Insulin, Insulin Glargine, Insulin Resistance, Insulin, Long-Acting, Metformin, Motor Activity, Neoplasms, Obesity, Prevalence, Research Design, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking, Sulfonylurea Compounds, Thiazolidinediones
%P 1144
%L 1155
%Y 10.1556/OH.2011.29158
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2011......152.1144R

@Article{Rosta2011,
author="Rosta, Andr{\'a}s",
title="[Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].",
journal="Orvosi hetilap",
year="2011",
month="Jul",
day="17",
volume="152",
number="29",
pages="1144--1155",
keywords="Adipokines",
keywords="Age Factors",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Cytokines",
keywords="Diabetes Complications",
keywords="Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2",
keywords="Food Habits",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Hyperglycemia",
keywords="Hyperinsulinism",
keywords="Hypoglycemic Agents",
keywords="Incidence",
keywords="Insulin",
keywords="Insulin Glargine",
keywords="Insulin Resistance",
keywords="Insulin, Long-Acting",
keywords="Metformin",
keywords="Motor Activity",
keywords="Neoplasms",
keywords="Obesity",
keywords="Prevalence",
keywords="Research Design",
keywords="Risk Factors",
keywords="Sex Factors",
keywords="Smoking",
keywords="Sulfonylurea Compounds",
keywords="Thiazolidinediones",
abstract="Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.",
issn="0030-6002",
doi="10.1556/OH.2011.29158",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712179",
language="hun"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].
%A Rosta, Andr?s
%J Orvosi hetilap
%D 2011
%8 Jul 17
%V 152
%N 29
%@ 0030-6002
%G hun
%F Rosta2011
%X Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
%K Adipokines
%K Age Factors
%K Animals
%K Cytokines
%K Diabetes Complications
%K Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
%K Food Habits
%K Humans
%K Hyperglycemia
%K Hyperinsulinism
%K Hypoglycemic Agents
%K Incidence
%K Insulin
%K Insulin Glargine
%K Insulin Resistance
%K Insulin, Long-Acting
%K Metformin
%K Motor Activity
%K Neoplasms
%K Obesity
%K Prevalence
%K Research Design
%K Risk Factors
%K Sex Factors
%K Smoking
%K Sulfonylurea Compounds
%K Thiazolidinediones
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/OH.2011.29158
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712179
%P 1144-1155

PT Journal
AU Rosta, A
TI [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].
SO Orvosi hetilap
JI Orv Hetil
PD Jul
PY 2011
BP 1144
EP 1155
VL 152
IS 29
DI 10.1556/OH.2011.29158
LA hun
DE Adipokines; Age Factors; Animals; Cytokines; Diabetes Complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Food Habits; Humans; Hyperglycemia; Hyperinsulinism; Hypoglycemic Agents; Incidence; Insulin; Insulin Glargine; Insulin Resistance; Insulin, Long-Acting; Metformin; Motor Activity; Neoplasms; Obesity; Prevalence; Research Design; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Smoking; Sulfonylurea Compounds; Thiazolidinediones
AB Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
ER

PMID- 21712179
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20110629
DCOM- 20110817
LR  - 20151119
IS  - 0030-6002 (Print)
IS  - 0030-6002 (Linking)
VI  - 152
IP  - 29
DP  - 2011 Jul 17
TI  - [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].
PG  - 1144-55
LID - 10.1556/OH.2011.29158 [doi]
AB  - Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide.
      The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious
      health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the
      coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than
      expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease.
      Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the
      risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk
      factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and
      malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In
      the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes,
      which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro
      experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of
      hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2
      diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities,
      antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2
      diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin
      therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of
      certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell
      proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and
      exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase
      the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue
      insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual 
      weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results 
      of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and 
      maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of
      treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study
      results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment
      modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of
      antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with 
      increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account.
      Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate
      the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and
      change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
FAU - Rosta, Andras
AU  - Rosta A
AD  - Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet Budapest Rath Gy. u. 5-9. 1122. [email protected]
LA  - hun
PT  - English Abstract
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
TT  - Diabetes es rakkockazat az onkologus szemszogebol.
PL  - Hungary
TA  - Orv Hetil
JT  - Orvosi hetilap
JID - 0376412
RN  - 0 (Adipokines)
RN  - 0 (Cytokines)
RN  - 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (Insulin, Long-Acting)
RN  - 0 (Sulfonylurea Compounds)
RN  - 0 (Thiazolidinediones)
RN  - 2ZM8CX04RZ (Insulin Glargine)
RN  - 9100L32L2N (Metformin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adipokines/metabolism
MH  - Age Factors
MH  - Animals
MH  - Cytokines/metabolism
MH  - *Diabetes Complications/epidemiology/metabolism/mortality/prevention & control
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/*drug therapy/metabolism
MH  - Food Habits
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hyperglycemia/complications
MH  - Hyperinsulinism/complications
MH  - Hypoglycemic Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Insulin/administration & dosage/adverse effects/analogs & derivatives
MH  - Insulin Glargine
MH  - Insulin Resistance
MH  - Insulin, Long-Acting
MH  - Metformin/administration & dosage/adverse effects
MH  - Motor Activity
MH  - Neoplasms/*epidemiology/ethnology/*etiology/metabolism/mortality/prevention &
      control
MH  - Obesity/complications
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Research Design
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Sex Factors
MH  - Smoking/adverse effects
MH  - Sulfonylurea Compounds/administration & dosage/adverse effects
MH  - Thiazolidinediones/administration & dosage/adverse effects
EDAT- 2011/06/30 06:00
MHDA- 2011/08/19 06:00
CRDT- 2011/06/30 06:00
AID - J181833R4482J408 [pii]
AID - 10.1556/OH.2011.29158 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Orv Hetil. 2011 Jul 17;152(29):1144-55. doi: 10.1556/OH.2011.29158.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Rosta, Andr?s
PY  - 2011/Jul/17
TI  - [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].
T2  - Orv Hetil
JO  - Orvosi hetilap
SP  - 1144
EP  - 1155
VL  - 152
IS  - 29
KW  - Adipokines
KW  - Age Factors
KW  - Animals
KW  - Cytokines
KW  - Diabetes Complications
KW  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
KW  - Food Habits
KW  - Humans
KW  - Hyperglycemia
KW  - Hyperinsulinism
KW  - Hypoglycemic Agents
KW  - Incidence
KW  - Insulin
KW  - Insulin Glargine
KW  - Insulin Resistance
KW  - Insulin, Long-Acting
KW  - Metformin
KW  - Motor Activity
KW  - Neoplasms
KW  - Obesity
KW  - Prevalence
KW  - Research Design
KW  - Risk Factors
KW  - Sex Factors
KW  - Smoking
KW  - Sulfonylurea Compounds
KW  - Thiazolidinediones
N2  - Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
SN  - 0030-6002
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/OH.2011.29158
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712179
ID  - Rosta2011
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Rosta2011</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2011</b:Year>
<b:Month>Jul</b:Month>
<b:Day>17</b:Day>
<b:PeriodicalName>Orvosi hetilap</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>152</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>29</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>1144-1155</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Rosta</b:Last><b:First>Andr&#225;s</b:First></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>[Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>Orv Hetil</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes. Presently, study results showing elevated mitogenic potential with some antidiabetic treatment modalities are not taken into account, when considering the choice of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. In the care of patients with increased cancer risk, oncologic considerations should be taken into account. Well designed, prospective, clinical studies would be necessary to demonstrate the possible correlation between treatment modalities of type 2 diabetes and change of cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>