PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.

Abstract Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
PMID
Related Publications

Repaglinide : a pharmacoeconomic review of its use in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Molecular action of insulin-sensitizing agents.

Use of insulin glargine and cancer incidence in Scotland: a study from the Scottish Diabetes Research Network Epidemiology Group.

The influence of glucose-lowering therapies on cancer risk in type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes mellitus and increased risk of cancer: focus on metformin and the insulin analogs.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title minerva endocrinologica
Publication Year Start
%A Pandey, A.; Forte, V.; Abdallah, M.; Alickaj, A.; Mahmud, S.; Asad, S.; McFarlane, S. I.
%T Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.
%J Minerva endocrinologica, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 187-209
%D 09/2011
%V 36
%N 3
%M eng
%B Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
%K Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin Glargine, Insulin, Long-Acting, Insulins, Metformin, Neoplasms, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors
%P 187
%L 209
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2011.......36..187P

@Article{Pandey2011,
author="Pandey, A.
and Forte, V.
and Abdallah, M.
and Alickaj, A.
and Mahmud, S.
and Asad, S.
and McFarlane, S. I.",
title="Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.",
journal="Minerva endocrinologica",
year="2011",
month="Sep",
volume="36",
number="3",
pages="187--209",
keywords="Diabetes Complications",
keywords="Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1",
keywords="Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Hypoglycemic Agents",
keywords="Insulin Glargine",
keywords="Insulin, Long-Acting",
keywords="Insulins",
keywords="Metformin",
keywords="Neoplasms",
keywords="Risk Assessment",
keywords="Risk Factors",
abstract="Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.",
issn="0391-1977",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22019750",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.
%A Pandey, A.
%A Forte, V.
%A Abdallah, M.
%A Alickaj, A.
%A Mahmud, S.
%A Asad, S.
%A McFarlane, S. I.
%J Minerva endocrinologica
%D 2011
%8 Sep
%V 36
%N 3
%@ 0391-1977
%G eng
%F Pandey2011
%X Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
%K Diabetes Complications
%K Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
%K Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
%K Humans
%K Hypoglycemic Agents
%K Insulin Glargine
%K Insulin, Long-Acting
%K Insulins
%K Metformin
%K Neoplasms
%K Risk Assessment
%K Risk Factors
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22019750
%P 187-209

PT Journal
AU Pandey, A
   Forte, V
   Abdallah, M
   Alickaj, A
   Mahmud, S
   Asad, S
   McFarlane, SI
TI Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.
SO Minerva endocrinologica
JI Minerva Endocrinol.
PD Sep
PY 2011
BP 187
EP 209
VL 36
IS 3
LA eng
DE Diabetes Complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Humans; Hypoglycemic Agents; Insulin Glargine; Insulin, Long-Acting; Insulins; Metformin; Neoplasms; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors
AB Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
ER

PMID- 22019750
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20111024
DCOM- 20120302
LR  - 20151119
IS  - 0391-1977 (Print)
IS  - 0391-1977 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 3
DP  - 2011 Sep
TI  - Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.
PG  - 187-209
AB  - Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a
      century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a
      lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic 
      and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic
      agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic
      population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon,
      pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with
      increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms
      postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia,
      hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common 
      soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as
      increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been
      thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears
      to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link
      between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such
      a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss
      the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
FAU - Pandey, A
AU  - Pandey A
AD  - Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Centre, New York, USA.
FAU - Forte, V
AU  - Forte V
FAU - Abdallah, M
AU  - Abdallah M
FAU - Alickaj, A
AU  - Alickaj A
FAU - Mahmud, S
AU  - Mahmud S
FAU - Asad, S
AU  - Asad S
FAU - McFarlane, S I
AU  - McFarlane SI
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - Italy
TA  - Minerva Endocrinol
JT  - Minerva endocrinologica
JID - 8406505
RN  - 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (Insulin, Long-Acting)
RN  - 0 (Insulins)
RN  - 2ZM8CX04RZ (Insulin Glargine)
RN  - 9100L32L2N (Metformin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Diabetes Complications/*physiopathology/prevention & control
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications/drug therapy/physiopathology
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/drug therapy/physiopathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage/*adverse effects
MH  - Insulin Glargine
MH  - Insulin, Long-Acting/adverse effects
MH  - Insulins/administration & dosage/*adverse effects
MH  - Metformin/pharmacology
MH  - Neoplasms/*chemically induced/etiology/pathology/*prevention & control
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Risk Factors
EDAT- 2011/10/25 06:00
MHDA- 2012/03/03 06:00
CRDT- 2011/10/25 06:00
AID - R07111873 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Minerva Endocrinol. 2011 Sep;36(3):187-209.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pandey, A.
AU  - Forte, V.
AU  - Abdallah, M.
AU  - Alickaj, A.
AU  - Mahmud, S.
AU  - Asad, S.
AU  - McFarlane, S. I.
PY  - 2011/Sep/
TI  - Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.
T2  - Minerva Endocrinol.
JO  - Minerva endocrinologica
SP  - 187
EP  - 209
VL  - 36
IS  - 3
KW  - Diabetes Complications
KW  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
KW  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
KW  - Humans
KW  - Hypoglycemic Agents
KW  - Insulin Glargine
KW  - Insulin, Long-Acting
KW  - Insulins
KW  - Metformin
KW  - Neoplasms
KW  - Risk Assessment
KW  - Risk Factors
N2  - Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.
SN  - 0391-1977
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22019750
ID  - Pandey2011
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Pandey2011</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2011</b:Year>
<b:Month>Sep</b:Month>
<b:PeriodicalName>Minerva endocrinologica</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>36</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>3</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>187-209</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Pandey</b:Last><b:First>A</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Forte</b:Last><b:First>V</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Abdallah</b:Last><b:First>M</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Alickaj</b:Last><b:First>A</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Mahmud</b:Last><b:First>S</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Asad</b:Last><b:First>S</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>McFarlane</b:Last><b:First>S</b:First><b:Middle>I</b:Middle></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cancer.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>Minerva Endocrinol.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Although diabetes has been known to increase the risk of cancer for over a century, it was not until recently when this area gained momentum and generated a lot of interest. That is in- part because of the rising global diabetes epidemic and the wide spread use of insulin analogues, metformin and other anti-diabetic agents, providing hypothesis generating data on the cancer risk in the diabetic population. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and other types of cancer, while type 1 diabetes is associated with increase in stomach, pancreatic, endometrial and cervical cancer. Mechanisms postulated for increased cancer risk in diabetes include hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with stimulation of IGF-1 axis, obesity that serves as a common soil hypothesis for both cancer and diabetes as well as other factors such as increased cytokine production. More recently some antidiabetic agents have been thought to increase cancer risk such as insulin glargine, while metformin appears to lower cancer risk. In this review, we present the evidence for the link between diabetes and cancer highlighting the general mechanisms proposed for such a link as well as specific hypotheses for individual cancer. We will also discuss the role of insulin, metformin and other antidiabetic agents in cancer risk.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>