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A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.

Abstract Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Molecular Diagnostic Techniques

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords
Journal Title journal of medical virology
Publication Year Start
%A Balm, Michelle N. D.; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Chiu, Lily; Koay, Evelyn S. C.; Tang, Julian W.
%T A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.
%J Journal of medical virology, vol. 84, no. 9, pp. 1501-1505
%D 09/2012
%V 84
%N 9
%M eng
%B Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.
%K Adult, Female, Fever, Genome, Viral, Humans, Limit of Detection, Male, Molecular Diagnostic Techniques, RNA, Viral, Reference Standards, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Singapore, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 1501
%L 1505
%Y 10.1002/jmv.23241
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2012.......84.1501B

@Article{Balm2012,
author="Balm, Michelle N. D.
and Lee, Chun Kiat
and Lee, Hong Kai
and Chiu, Lily
and Koay, Evelyn S. C.
and Tang, Julian W.",
title="A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.",
journal="Journal of medical virology",
year="2012",
month="Sep",
volume="84",
number="9",
pages="1501--1505",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Fever",
keywords="Genome, Viral",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Limit of Detection",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Molecular Diagnostic Techniques",
keywords="RNA, Viral",
keywords="Reference Standards",
keywords="Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction",
keywords="Sequence Analysis, RNA",
keywords="Singapore",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10\% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.",
issn="1096-9071",
doi="10.1002/jmv.23241",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22825831",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.
%A Balm, Michelle N. D.
%A Lee, Chun Kiat
%A Lee, Hong Kai
%A Chiu, Lily
%A Koay, Evelyn S. C.
%A Tang, Julian W.
%J Journal of medical virology
%D 2012
%8 Sep
%V 84
%N 9
%@ 1096-9071
%G eng
%F Balm2012
%X Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.
%K Adult
%K Female
%K Fever
%K Genome, Viral
%K Humans
%K Limit of Detection
%K Male
%K Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
%K RNA, Viral
%K Reference Standards
%K Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
%K Sequence Analysis, RNA
%K Singapore
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.23241
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22825831
%P 1501-1505

PT Journal
AU Balm, MND
   Lee, CK
   Lee, HK
   Chiu, L
   Koay, ESC
   Tang, JW
TI A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.
SO Journal of medical virology
JI J. Med. Virol.
PD Sep
PY 2012
BP 1501
EP 1505
VL 84
IS 9
DI 10.1002/jmv.23241
LA eng
DE Adult; Female; Fever; Genome, Viral; Humans; Limit of Detection; Male; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques; RNA, Viral; Reference Standards; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Sequence Analysis, RNA; Singapore; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.
ER

PMID- 22825831
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20120724
DCOM- 20121119
LR  - 20160205
IS  - 1096-9071 (Electronic)
IS  - 0146-6615 (Linking)
VI  - 84
IP  - 9
DP  - 2012 Sep
TI  - A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.
PG  - 1501-5
LID - 10.1002/jmv.23241 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a
      dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash.
      Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV
      was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia).
      Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and
      economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya
      virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory
      confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like,
      mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's
      population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes
      mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus 
      is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A
      specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction 
      (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived
      samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to
      our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in
      Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower
      limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on
      synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 
      samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of
      these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted 
      in community-based environments.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
FAU - Balm, Michelle N D
AU  - Balm MN
AD  - Division of Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, National University 
      Hospital, Singapore.
FAU - Lee, Chun Kiat
AU  - Lee CK
FAU - Lee, Hong Kai
AU  - Lee HK
FAU - Chiu, Lily
AU  - Chiu L
FAU - Koay, Evelyn S C
AU  - Koay ES
FAU - Tang, Julian W
AU  - Tang JW
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - United States
TA  - J Med Virol
JT  - Journal of medical virology
JID - 7705876
RN  - 0 (RNA, Viral)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Female
MH  - Fever/diagnosis/virology
MH  - Genome, Viral
MH  - Humans
MH  - Limit of Detection
MH  - Male
MH  - *Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/standards
MH  - RNA, Viral/genetics/isolation & purification
MH  - Reference Standards
MH  - *Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards
MH  - Sequence Analysis, RNA
MH  - Singapore
MH  - Zika Virus/*genetics
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*diagnosis/virology
EDAT- 2012/07/25 06:00
MHDA- 2012/12/10 06:00
CRDT- 2012/07/25 06:00
AID - 10.1002/jmv.23241 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Med Virol. 2012 Sep;84(9):1501-5. doi: 10.1002/jmv.23241.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Balm, Michelle N. D.
AU  - Lee, Chun Kiat
AU  - Lee, Hong Kai
AU  - Chiu, Lily
AU  - Koay, Evelyn S. C.
AU  - Tang, Julian W.
PY  - 2012/Sep/
TI  - A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.
T2  - J. Med. Virol.
JO  - Journal of medical virology
SP  - 1501
EP  - 1505
VL  - 84
IS  - 9
KW  - Adult
KW  - Female
KW  - Fever
KW  - Genome, Viral
KW  - Humans
KW  - Limit of Detection
KW  - Male
KW  - Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
KW  - RNA, Viral
KW  - Reference Standards
KW  - Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
KW  - Sequence Analysis, RNA
KW  - Singapore
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.
SN  - 1096-9071
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.23241
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22825831
ID  - Balm2012
ER  - 
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<b:Comments>Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore&apos;s population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.</b:Comments>
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