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Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.

Abstract Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Safe Sex

Keywords
Journal Title journal of health, population, and nutrition
Publication Year Start
%A Ayiga, Natal
%T Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.
%J Journal of health, population, and nutrition, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 270-280
%D 09/2012
%V 30
%N 3
%M eng
%B Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
%K Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Adult, Anti-Retroviral Agents, Condoms, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Retrospective Studies, Safe Sex, Uganda, Unsafe Sex
%P 270
%L 280
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2012.......30..270A

@Article{Ayiga2012,
author="Ayiga, Natal",
title="Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.",
journal="Journal of health, population, and nutrition",
year="2012",
month="Sep",
volume="30",
number="3",
pages="270--280",
keywords="Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Anti-Retroviral Agents",
keywords="Condoms",
keywords="Cross-Sectional Studies",
keywords="Female",
keywords="HIV Infections",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Retrospective Studies",
keywords="Safe Sex",
keywords="Uganda",
keywords="Unsafe Sex",
abstract="Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65\% (70\% of men and 61\% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.",
issn="1606-0997",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082629",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.
%A Ayiga, Natal
%J Journal of health, population, and nutrition
%D 2012
%8 Sep
%V 30
%N 3
%@ 1606-0997
%G eng
%F Ayiga2012
%X Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
%K Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
%K Adult
%K Anti-Retroviral Agents
%K Condoms
%K Cross-Sectional Studies
%K Female
%K HIV Infections
%K Humans
%K Male
%K Retrospective Studies
%K Safe Sex
%K Uganda
%K Unsafe Sex
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082629
%P 270-280

PT Journal
AU Ayiga, N
TI Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.
SO Journal of health, population, and nutrition
JI J Health Popul Nutr
PD Sep
PY 2012
BP 270
EP 280
VL 30
IS 3
LA eng
DE Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Adult; Anti-Retroviral Agents; Condoms; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; HIV Infections; Humans; Male; Retrospective Studies; Safe Sex; Uganda; Unsafe Sex
AB Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
ER

PMID- 23082629
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20121022
DCOM- 20121113
LR  - 20150222
IS  - 1606-0997 (Print)
IS  - 1606-0997 (Linking)
VI  - 30
IP  - 3
DP  - 2012 Sep
TI  - Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on
      antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.
PG  - 270-80
AB  - Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for
      reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly
      expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected 
      sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and
      predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART.
      The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active
      ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above.
      The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom
      consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if
      PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner
      in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used
      condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged
      to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART
      for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a
      sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and
      desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently.
      The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom,
      there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
FAU - Ayiga, Natal
AU  - Ayiga N
AD  - Population Research and Training Unit, North West University, Private Bag X2046, 
      Mmabatho 2735, South Africa. [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - Bangladesh
TA  - J Health Popul Nutr
JT  - Journal of health, population, and nutrition
JID - 100959228
RN  - 0 (Anti-Retroviral Agents)
SB  - IM
MH  - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*drug therapy/ethnology
MH  - Adult
MH  - Anti-Retroviral Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - Condoms/*utilization
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - HIV Infections/*drug therapy/ethnology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - *Safe Sex/ethnology
MH  - Uganda
MH  - Unsafe Sex/ethnology
PMC - PMC3489943
OID - NLM: PMC3489943
EDAT- 2012/10/23 06:00
MHDA- 2012/11/14 06:00
CRDT- 2012/10/23 06:00
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Health Popul Nutr. 2012 Sep;30(3):270-80.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ayiga, Natal
PY  - 2012/Sep/
TI  - Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.
T2  - J Health Popul Nutr
JO  - Journal of health, population, and nutrition
SP  - 270
EP  - 280
VL  - 30
IS  - 3
KW  - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
KW  - Adult
KW  - Anti-Retroviral Agents
KW  - Condoms
KW  - Cross-Sectional Studies
KW  - Female
KW  - HIV Infections
KW  - Humans
KW  - Male
KW  - Retrospective Studies
KW  - Safe Sex
KW  - Uganda
KW  - Unsafe Sex
N2  - Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART.
SN  - 1606-0997
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082629
ID  - Ayiga2012
ER  - 
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