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Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution, cervical cancer screening practices and current status of vaccination implementation in Russian Federation, the Western countries of the former Soviet Union, Caucasus region and Central Asia.

Abstract Limited data are available on the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) and its associated diseases in the Russian Federation, the Western Countries of the former Soviet Union (Belarus, Republic of Moldova, Ukraine), the Caucasus region and Central Asia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan). Both the incidence and mortality rate of cervical cancer are higher in these countries than in most Western European countries. In this article, we review available data on HPV prevalence and type distribution in women with normal cytology, women from the general population, cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer, as well as data on national policies of cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination initiatives in these countries. Based on scarce data from the 12 countries, the high-risk HPV (hrHPV) prevalence among 5226 women with normal cytology ranged from 0.0% to 48.4%. In women with low-grade cervical lesions, the hrHPV prevalence among 1062 women varied from 29.2% to 100%. HrHPV infection in 565 women with high-grade cervical lesions ranged from 77.2% to 100% and in 464 invasive cervical cancer samples from 89.8% to 100%. HPV16 was the most commonly detected hrHPV genotype in all categories. As the HPV genotype distribution in cervical diseases seems to be similar to that found in Western Europe the implementation of HPV testing in screening programs might be beneficial. Opportunistic screening programs, the lack of efficient call-recall systems, low coverage, and the absence of quality assured cytology with centralized screening registry are major reasons for low success rates of cervical cancer programs in many of the countries. Finally, HPV vaccination is currently not widely implemented in most of the twelve countries mainly due to pricing, availability, and limited awareness among public and health care providers. Country-specific research, organized nationwide screening programs, registries and well defined vaccination policies are needed. This article forms part of a Regional Report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 7, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.
PMID
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Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution, cervical cancer screening practices and current status of vaccination implementation in Central and Eastern Europe.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Caucasus region

Central Asia

Cervical cancer

Eastern Europe

HPV

HPV vaccination

Screening

Journal Title vaccine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 24332297
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20131216
DCOM- 20140731
LR  - 20131216
IS  - 1873-2518 (Electronic)
IS  - 0264-410X (Linking)
VI  - 31 Suppl 7
DP  - 2013 Dec 31
TI  - Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution, cervical cancer screening 
      practices and current status of vaccination implementation in Russian Federation,
      the Western countries of the former Soviet Union, Caucasus region and Central
      Asia.
PG  - H46-58
LID - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.06.043 [doi]
LID - S0264-410X(13)00822-0 [pii]
AB  - Limited data are available on the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) and its
      associated diseases in the Russian Federation, the Western Countries of the
      former Soviet Union (Belarus, Republic of Moldova, Ukraine), the Caucasus region 
      and Central Asia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,
      Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan). Both the incidence and mortality rate of
      cervical cancer are higher in these countries than in most Western European
      countries. In this article, we review available data on HPV prevalence and type
      distribution in women with normal cytology, women from the general population,
      cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer, as well as data on national
      policies of cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination initiatives in these
      countries. Based on scarce data from the 12 countries, the high-risk HPV (hrHPV) 
      prevalence among 5226 women with normal cytology ranged from 0.0% to 48.4%. In
      women with low-grade cervical lesions, the hrHPV prevalence among 1062 women
      varied from 29.2% to 100%. HrHPV infection in 565 women with high-grade cervical 
      lesions ranged from 77.2% to 100% and in 464 invasive cervical cancer samples
      from 89.8% to 100%. HPV16 was the most commonly detected hrHPV genotype in all
      categories. As the HPV genotype distribution in cervical diseases seems to be
      similar to that found in Western Europe the implementation of HPV testing in
      screening programs might be beneficial. Opportunistic screening programs, the
      lack of efficient call-recall systems, low coverage, and the absence of quality
      assured cytology with centralized screening registry are major reasons for low
      success rates of cervical cancer programs in many of the countries. Finally, HPV 
      vaccination is currently not widely implemented in most of the twelve countries
      mainly due to pricing, availability, and limited awareness among public and
      health care providers. Country-specific research, organized nationwide screening 
      programs, registries and well defined vaccination policies are needed. This
      article forms part of a Regional Report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV
      Infections and Related Diseases in the Central and Eastern Europe and Central
      Asia Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 7, 2013. Updates of the progress in
      the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control
      of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Rogovskaya, Svetlana I
AU  - Rogovskaya SI
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Russian Medical Academy of Post-graduate
      Education, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Shabalova, Irina P
AU  - Shabalova IP
AD  - Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics, Russian Medical Academy of
      Post-graduate Education, Moscow, Russia.
FAU - Mikheeva, Irina V
AU  - Mikheeva IV
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, IM Sechenova Moscow Medical University, Moscow,
      Russia.
FAU - Minkina, Galina N
AU  - Minkina GN
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Moscow Medical University, Moscow,
      Russia.
FAU - Podzolkova, Nataly M
AU  - Podzolkova NM
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Russian Medical Academy of Post-graduate
      Education, Moscow, Russia.
FAU - Shipulina, Olga Y
AU  - Shipulina OY
AD  - Laboratory PCR Department, Central Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russia.
FAU - Sultanov, Said N
AU  - Sultanov SN
AD  - Research Centre of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Ministry of Health, Tashkent,
      Uzbekistan.
FAU - Kosenko, Iren A
AU  - Kosenko IA
AD  - Department of Oncogynecology, Research Centre of Oncology of Ministry of Health, 
      Minsk, Belarus.
FAU - Brotons, Maria
AU  - Brotons M
AD  - Institut d'Investigacio Biomedica de Bellvitge - Bellvitge Biomedical Research
      Institute (IDIBELL), Unit of Infections and Cancer (UNIC), Cancer Epidemiology
      Research Program (CERP), Institut Catala d'Oncologia - Catalan Institute of
      Oncology (ICO), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
FAU - Buttmann, Nina
AU  - Buttmann N
AD  - Centre for Cancer Registry Data, Robert Koch-Institute, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Dartell, Myassa
AU  - Dartell M
AD  - Department of International Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen,
      Denmark.
FAU - Arbyn, Marc
AU  - Arbyn M
AD  - Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels,
      Belgium; Laboratory for Cell Biology and Histology, University of Antwerp,
      Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Syrjanen, Stina
AU  - Syrjanen S
AD  - Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Institute of Dentistry and
      Medicine Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
FAU - Poljak, Mario
AU  - Poljak M
AD  - Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of
      Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Vaccine
JT  - Vaccine
JID - 8406899
RN  - 0 (Papillomavirus Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Asia, Central/epidemiology
MH  - Early Detection of Cancer/methods/*utilization
MH  - Europe, Eastern/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Genotype
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Papillomaviridae/classification/genetics/*isolation & purification
MH  - Papillomavirus Infections/complications/*epidemiology/prevention &
      control/virology
MH  - Papillomavirus Vaccines/*administration & dosage
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Russia/epidemiology
MH  - Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis/pathology/*prevention & control
MH  - Vaccination/methods/*utilization
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Caucasus region
OT  - Central Asia
OT  - Cervical cancer
OT  - Eastern Europe
OT  - HPV
OT  - HPV vaccination
OT  - Screening
EDAT- 2013/12/18 06:00
MHDA- 2014/08/01 06:00
CRDT- 2013/12/17 06:00
PHST- 2012/04/27 [received]
PHST- 2013/05/31 [revised]
PHST- 2013/06/07 [accepted]
AID - S0264-410X(13)00822-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.06.043 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Vaccine. 2013 Dec 31;31 Suppl 7:H46-58. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.06.043.