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Dispositional aspects of body focus and idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF).

Abstract Body focus is often considered an undesirable characteristic from medical point of view as it amplifies symptoms and leads to higher levels of health anxiety. However, it is connected to mindfulness, well-being and the sense of self in psychotherapy. The current study aimed to investigate the contribution of various body focus related constructs to acute and chronic generation and maintenance of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). Thirty-six individuals with idiopathic environmental intolerance to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) and 36 controls were asked to complete questionnaires assessing negative affect, worries about harmful effects of EMFs, health anxiety (HA), body awareness, and somatosensory amplification (SSA), and to report experienced symptoms evoked by a sham magnetic field. Body awareness, HA, SSA, and EMF-related worries showed good discriminative power between individuals with IEI-EMF and controls. Considering all variables together, SSA was the best predictor of IEI-EMF. In the believed presence of a MF, people with IEI-EMF showed higher levels of anxiety and reported more symptoms than controls. In the IEI-EMF group, actual symptom reports were predicted by HA and state anxiety, while a reverse relationship between symptom reports and HA was found in the control group. Our findings show that SSA is a particularly important contributor to IEI-EMF, probably because it is the most comprehensive factor in its aetiology. IEI-EMF is associated with both a fear-related monitoring of bodily symptoms and a non-evaluative body focus. The identification of dispositional body focus may be relevant for the management of MUS.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Attitude to Health

Awareness

Electromagnetic Fields

Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Keywords

IEI-EMF

nocebo

somatosensory amplification

Journal Title scandinavian journal of psychology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 26861662
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160307
DCOM- 20170116
LR  - 20170116
IS  - 1467-9450 (Electronic)
IS  - 0036-5564 (Linking)
VI  - 57
IP  - 2
DP  - 2016 Apr
TI  - Dispositional aspects of body focus and idiopathic environmental intolerance
      attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF).
PG  - 136-43
LID - 10.1111/sjop.12271 [doi]
AB  - Body focus is often considered an undesirable characteristic from medical point
      of view as it amplifies symptoms and leads to higher levels of health anxiety.
      However, it is connected to mindfulness, well-being and the sense of self in
      psychotherapy. The current study aimed to investigate the contribution of various
      body focus related constructs to acute and chronic generation and maintenance of 
      medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). Thirty-six individuals with idiopathic
      environmental intolerance to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) and 36 controls
      were asked to complete questionnaires assessing negative affect, worries about
      harmful effects of EMFs, health anxiety (HA), body awareness, and somatosensory
      amplification (SSA), and to report experienced symptoms evoked by a sham magnetic
      field. Body awareness, HA, SSA, and EMF-related worries showed good
      discriminative power between individuals with IEI-EMF and controls. Considering
      all variables together, SSA was the best predictor of IEI-EMF. In the believed
      presence of a MF, people with IEI-EMF showed higher levels of anxiety and
      reported more symptoms than controls. In the IEI-EMF group, actual symptom
      reports were predicted by HA and state anxiety, while a reverse relationship
      between symptom reports and HA was found in the control group. Our findings show 
      that SSA is a particularly important contributor to IEI-EMF, probably because it 
      is the most comprehensive factor in its aetiology. IEI-EMF is associated with
      both a fear-related monitoring of bodily symptoms and a non-evaluative body
      focus. The identification of dispositional body focus may be relevant for the
      management of MUS.
CI  - (c) 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
FAU - Domotor, Zsuzsanna
AU  - Domotor Z
AD  - Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.
FAU - Doering, Bettina K
AU  - Doering BK
AD  - Philipps-University Marburg, Germany.
FAU - Koteles, Ferenc
AU  - Koteles F
AD  - Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160210
PL  - England
TA  - Scand J Psychol
JT  - Scandinavian journal of psychology
JID - 0404510
SB  - IM
MH  - Anxiety/*psychology
MH  - *Attitude to Health
MH  - *Awareness
MH  - *Electromagnetic Fields
MH  - Female
MH  - Human Body
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Medically Unexplained Symptoms
MH  - Multiple Chemical Sensitivity/*psychology
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - IEI-EMF
OT  - nocebo
OT  - somatosensory amplification
EDAT- 2016/02/11 06:00
MHDA- 2017/01/17 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/11 06:00
PHST- 2015/08/13 [received]
PHST- 2015/11/02 [accepted]
AID - 10.1111/sjop.12271 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Scand J Psychol. 2016 Apr;57(2):136-43. doi: 10.1111/sjop.12271. Epub 2016 Feb
      10.

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