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Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.

Abstract Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Atopy

Building ventilation

Climate change

Mold and dampness

Outdoor air pollution

Redecoration

Journal Title the science of the total environment
Publication Year Start
%A Lu, Chan; Deng, Qihong; Li, Yuguo; Sundell, Jan; Norb?ck, Dan
%T Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.
%J The Science of the total environment, vol. 560-561, pp. 186-196
%D 08/2016
%V 560-561
%M eng
%B Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.
%P 186
%L 196
%Y 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016......560..186L

@Article{Lu2016,
author="Lu, Chan
and Deng, Qihong
and Li, Yuguo
and Sundell, Jan
and Norb{\"a}ck, Dan",
title="Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.",
journal="The Science of the total environment",
year="2016",
month="Aug",
day="01",
volume="560-561",
pages="186--196",
abstract="Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10$\mu$m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95\% confidence interval (95\% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.",
issn="1879-1026",
doi="10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27101454",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.
%A Lu, Chan
%A Deng, Qihong
%A Li, Yuguo
%A Sundell, Jan
%A Norb?ck, Dan
%J The Science of the total environment
%D 2016
%8 Aug 01
%V 560-561
%@ 1879-1026
%G eng
%F Lu2016
%X Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27101454
%P 186-196

PT Journal
AU Lu, C
   Deng, Q
   Li, Y
   Sundell, J
   Norb?ck, D
TI Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.
SO The Science of the total environment
JI Sci. Total Environ.
PD Aug
PY 2016
BP 186
EP 196
VL 560-561
DI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033
LA eng
AB Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.
ER

PMID- 27101454
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
DA  - 20160430
IS  - 1879-1026 (Electronic)
IS  - 0048-9697 (Linking)
VI  - 560-561
DP  - 2016 Aug 1
TI  - Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings 
      in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.
PG  - 186-96
LID - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033 [doi]
LID - S0048-9697(16)30714-8 [pii]
AB  - Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but
      little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and
      meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air
      pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building
      characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire
      study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included
      particulate matters with diameter &lt;10mum (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen
      dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind
      speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied
      calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or
      allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except
      fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the
      floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache
      OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37)
      and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was
      associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53
      (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62
      (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06).
      Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54
      (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms
      OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window
      pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor
      air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor 
      and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS
      symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In
      conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer
      ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an
      adult Chinese population, especially among females.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Lu, Chan
AU  - Lu C
AD  - School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha,
      Hunan, China.
FAU - Deng, Qihong
AU  - Deng Q
AD  - School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha,
      Hunan, China; School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan,
      China. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Li, Yuguo
AU  - Li Y
AD  - Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong,
      China.
FAU - Sundell, Jan
AU  - Sundell J
AD  - School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha,
      Hunan, China; School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Norback, Dan
AU  - Norback D
AD  - Department of Medical Sciences/Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala
      University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160419
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Sci Total Environ
JT  - The Science of the total environment
JID - 0330500
SB  - IM
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Atopy
OT  - Building ventilation
OT  - Climate change
OT  - Mold and dampness
OT  - Outdoor air pollution
OT  - Redecoration
EDAT- 2016/04/22 06:00
MHDA- 2016/04/22 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/22 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/08 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/05 [revised]
PHST- 2016/04/06 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/04/19 [aheadofprint]
AID - S0048-9697(16)30714-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Sci Total Environ. 2016 Aug 1;560-561:186-96. doi:
      10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033. Epub 2016 Apr 19.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Lu, Chan
AU  - Deng, Qihong
AU  - Li, Yuguo
AU  - Sundell, Jan
AU  - Norb?ck, Dan
PY  - 2016/Aug/01
TI  - Outdoor air pollution, meteorological conditions and indoor factors in dwellings in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS) among adults in China.
T2  - Sci. Total Environ.
JO  - The Science of the total environment
SP  - 186
EP  - 196
VL  - 560-561
N2  - Indoor environment is associated with the sick building syndrome (SBS), but little is known about the contribution of outdoor air pollution and meteorological conditions to SBS. We studied associations between outdoor air pollution, meteorological parameters and selected indoor exposure and building characteristics at home and weekly SBS symptoms in a standardized questionnaire study among 3485 randomly selected adults in China. Outdoor factors included particulate matters with diameter <10?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), outdoor temperature (T), relative air humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) during last three months. Multiple logistic regression was applied calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Asthma or allergic rhinitis (atopy) was associated with all types of SBS symptoms except fatigue. Indoor factors played a major role in SBS symptoms. Mold/dampness on the floor/ceiling was associated with fatigue OR=1.60 (1.11-2.30) and headache OR=1.80 (1.07-3.04). Moldy odor was associated with fatigue OR=1.59 (1.07-2.37) and dermal symptoms OR=1.91 (1.21-3.02). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with fatigue OR=1.73 (1.30-2.31) and throat symptoms OR=1.53 (1.01-2.31). Damp bed clothing was related with throat symptom OR=1.62 (1.09-2.40). Home redecoration was associated with fatigue OR=1.49 (1.07-2.06). Frequent window opening was associated with less nose symptoms OR=0.54 (0.36-0.82) and mechanical ventilation in the bathroom reduced dermal symptoms OR=0.66 (0.44-0.99). Females were more susceptible to redecoration and window pane condensation than men. No associations with SBS were observed for outdoor air pollutants or meteorological parameters in the final models combining indoor and outdoor factors, although SO2, T, and RH were associated with some SBS symptoms (fatigue, eyes and nose symptoms) in the separate outdoor models. In conclusion, indoor mold/dampness, air pollution from redecoration and poorer ventilation conditions in dwellings can be risk factors for SBS symptoms in an adult Chinese population, especially among females.
SN  - 1879-1026
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.033
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27101454
ID  - Lu2016
ER  - 
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