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Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

Abstract The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this conclusion by the application of these HMTE on BC cell lines.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Arsenic

Cadmium

Heavy metals

Lead

Trace elements

Urothelial carcinoma

Journal Title biological trace element research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 27147435
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170119
LR  - 20170119
IS  - 1559-0720 (Electronic)
IS  - 0163-4984 (Linking)
VI  - 174
IP  - 2
DP  - 2016 Dec
TI  - Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary
      Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal
      Cadaveric Tissue.
PG  - 280-286
AB  - The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some
      cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy 
      of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are
      exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet.
      The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and
      adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric
      bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness
      cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC)
      specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We
      used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers.
      All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by
      using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome
      analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon
      signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the
      adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead,
      selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control
      alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium,
      magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of
      cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel,
      selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in
      cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level
      was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The
      high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the
      cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC
      specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further
      work-up is needed to support this conclusion by the application of these HMTE on 
      BC cell lines.
FAU - Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud
AU  - Abdel-Gawad M
AD  - Department of Urology, Emirates International Hospital (M A-G), Al Jimi, Al Ain, 
      Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. [email protected]
FAU - Elsobky, Emad
AU  - Elsobky E
AD  - Department of Urology, Al-Noor Hospital (EE), Khalifa Street, Abu Dhabi, United
      Arab Emirates.
FAU - Shalaby, Mahmoud M
AU  - Shalaby MM
AD  - Assiut Urology and Nephrology Hospital (MMS), Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.
FAU - Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed
AU  - Abd-Elhameed M
AD  - Urology and Nephrology Center (M A-E, M A-R, BA), Mansoura University, Mansoura, 
      Egypt.
FAU - Abdel-Rahim, Mona
AU  - Abdel-Rahim M
AD  - Urology and Nephrology Center (M A-E, M A-R, BA), Mansoura University, Mansoura, 
      Egypt.
FAU - Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir
AU  - Ali-El-Dein B
AD  - Urology and Nephrology Center (M A-E, M A-R, BA), Mansoura University, Mansoura, 
      Egypt.
LA  - eng
PT  - Comparative Study
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160505
PL  - United States
TA  - Biol Trace Elem Res
JT  - Biological trace element research
JID - 7911509
RN  - 0 (Metals, Heavy)
RN  - 0 (Trace Elements)
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Cadaver
MH  - Cell Line, Tumor
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Metals, Heavy/*metabolism
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Trace Elements/*metabolism
MH  - Urinary Bladder/*metabolism/pathology
MH  - Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/*metabolism/pathology/therapy
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Arsenic
OT  - Cadmium
OT  - Heavy metals
OT  - Lead
OT  - Trace elements
OT  - Urothelial carcinoma
EDAT- 2016/11/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/01/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/06 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/01/20 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/05/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s12011-016-0724-1 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s12011-016-0724-1 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Biol Trace Elem Res. 2016 Dec;174(2):280-286. doi: 10.1007/s12011-016-0724-1.
      Epub 2016 May 5.