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Carbon Dioxide Detection and Indoor Air Quality Control.

Abstract When building ventilation is reduced, energy is saved because it is not necessary to heat or cool as much outside air. Reduced ventilation can result in higher levels of carbon dioxide, which may cause building occupants to experience symptoms. Heating or cooling for ventilation air can be enhanced by a DCV system, which can save energy while providing a comfortable environment. Carbon dioxide concentrations within a building are often used to indicate whether adequate fresh air is being supplied to the building. These DCV systems use carbon dioxide sensors in each space or in the return air and adjust the ventilation based on carbon dioxide concentration; the higher the concentration, the more people occupy the space relative to the ventilation rate. With a carbon dioxide sensor DCV system, the fresh air ventilation rate varies based on the number ofpeople in the space, saving energy while maintaining a safe and comfortable environment.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title occupational health & safety (waco, tex.)
Publication Year Start




PMID- 27183813
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160517
DCOM- 20160602
IS  - 0362-4064 (Print)
IS  - 0362-4064 (Linking)
VI  - 85
IP  - 4
DP  - 2016 Apr
TI  - Carbon Dioxide Detection and Indoor Air Quality Control.
PG  - 46-8
AB  - When building ventilation is reduced, energy is saved because it is not necessary
      to heat or cool as much outside air. Reduced ventilation can result in higher
      levels of carbon dioxide, which may cause building occupants to experience
      symptoms. Heating or cooling for ventilation air can be enhanced by a DCV system,
      which can save energy while providing a comfortable environment. Carbon dioxide
      concentrations within a building are often used to indicate whether adequate
      fresh air is being supplied to the building. These DCV systems use carbon dioxide
      sensors in each space or in the return air and adjust the ventilation based on
      carbon dioxide concentration; the higher the concentration, the more people
      occupy the space relative to the ventilation rate. With a carbon dioxide sensor
      DCV system, the fresh air ventilation rate varies based on the number ofpeople in
      the space, saving energy while maintaining a safe and comfortable environment.
FAU - Bonino, Steve
AU  - Bonino S
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Occup Health Saf
JT  - Occupational health & safety (Waco, Tex.)
JID - 7610574
RN  - 142M471B3J (Carbon Dioxide)
SB  - IM
MH  - Air Pollution, Indoor/*analysis
MH  - Carbon Dioxide/adverse effects/*analysis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Occupational Health
MH  - Sick Building Syndrome/*prevention & control
MH  - Ventilation/*methods
EDAT- 2016/05/18 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/18 06:00
PST - ppublish
SO  - Occup Health Saf. 2016 Apr;85(4):46-8.

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