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The correlation of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system with other environmental parameters in commercial buildings as possible indicator for indoor air quality.

Abstract The free-living protozoan Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen that is ubiquitous in our environment. However, its role in affecting indoor air quality and ill-health of indoor occupants is relatively unknown. The present study investigated the presence of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system and its correlation with other indoor air quality parameters, used in the industry code of practice and its potential as an indicator for indoor air quality. Indoor air quality assessments were carried out in nine commercial buildings with approval from the building management, and the parameters assessed were as recommended by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The presence of Acanthamoeba was determined through dust swabs from the ventilation system and indoor furniture. Logistic regression was performed to study the correlation between assessed parameters and occupants' complaints. A total of 107 sampling points were assessed and 40.2% of the supplying air diffuser and blowing fan and 15% of the furniture were positive for cysts. There was a significant correlation between Acanthamoeba detected from the ventilation system with ambient total fungus count (r=0.327; p=0.01) and respirable particulates (r=0.276; p=0.01). Occupants' sick building syndrome experience also correlated with the presence of Acanthamoeba in the ventilation system (r=0.361; p=0.01) and those detected on the furniture (r=0.290; p=0.01). Logistic regression showed that there was a five-fold probability of sick building syndrome among occupants when Acanthamoeba was detected in the ventilation system.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Sick Building Syndrome

Ventilation

Keywords
Journal Title industrial health
Publication Year Start




PMID- 27476379
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160801
DCOM- 20170807
LR  - 20170807
IS  - 1880-8026 (Electronic)
IS  - 0019-8366 (Linking)
VI  - 55
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 07
TI  - The correlation of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system with other
      environmental parameters in commercial buildings as possible indicator for indoor
      air quality.
PG  - 35-45
LID - 10.2486/indhealth.2015-0218 [doi]
AB  - The free-living protozoan Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen that is
      ubiquitous in our environment. However, its role in affecting indoor air quality 
      and ill-health of indoor occupants is relatively unknown. The present study
      investigated the presence of Acanthamoeba from the ventilation system and its
      correlation with other indoor air quality parameters, used in the industry code
      of practice and its potential as an indicator for indoor air quality. Indoor air 
      quality assessments were carried out in nine commercial buildings with approval
      from the building management, and the parameters assessed were as recommended by 
      the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The presence of Acanthamoeba
      was determined through dust swabs from the ventilation system and indoor
      furniture. Logistic regression was performed to study the correlation between
      assessed parameters and occupants' complaints. A total of 107 sampling points
      were assessed and 40.2% of the supplying air diffuser and blowing fan and 15% of 
      the furniture were positive for cysts. There was a significant correlation
      between Acanthamoeba detected from the ventilation system with ambient total
      fungus count (r=0.327; p=0.01) and respirable particulates (r=0.276; p=0.01).
      Occupants' sick building syndrome experience also correlated with the presence of
      Acanthamoeba in the ventilation system (r=0.361; p=0.01) and those detected on
      the furniture (r=0.290; p=0.01). Logistic regression showed that there was a
      five-fold probability of sick building syndrome among occupants when Acanthamoeba
      was detected in the ventilation system.
FAU - Ooi, Soo Shen
AU  - Ooi SS
AD  - School of Postgraduate Studies, Institute for Research, Development and
      Innovation (IRDI), International Medical University, Malaysia.
FAU - Mak, Joon Wah
AU  - Mak JW
FAU - Chen, Donald K F
AU  - Chen DK
FAU - Ambu, Stephen
AU  - Ambu S
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160729
PL  - Japan
TA  - Ind Health
JT  - Industrial health
JID - 2985065R
SB  - IM
MH  - Acanthamoeba/*isolation & purification
MH  - Air Pollution, Indoor/*analysis
MH  - Amebiasis/*epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Logistic Models
MH  - Opportunistic Infections
MH  - *Sick Building Syndrome
MH  - *Ventilation
PMC - PMC5285312
EDAT- 2016/08/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/08 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/02 06:00
AID - 10.2486/indhealth.2015-0218 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Ind Health. 2017 Feb 7;55(1):35-45. doi: 10.2486/indhealth.2015-0218. Epub 2016
      Jul 29.