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Experience of living with nonspecific building-related symptoms.

Abstract Nonspecific building-related symptoms (NBRS) is a combination of general, skin and mucosal symptoms related to certain buildings. Despite high prevalence in the general population and severe symptomatology in certain cases there is no scientific documentation of quality of life in NBRS. The purpose of this study was to illuminate how individuals with NBRS experience daily life. Data were collected through descriptive, written texts and through telephone interviews with 11 individuals diagnosed with NBRS, and qualitative content analysis was conducted. Three main content areas were identified: (1) attitudes from the surrounding (categories: being questioned and lack of understanding from others; from zero to full support); (2) consequences (difficulties with daily activities; financial difficulties; affecting family and friends; emotional consequences); and (3) coping (learning to accept and finding solutions; avoiding; struggling; finding the positive; making one's home a sanctuary). As a conclusion, NBRS may affect several aspects of daily life, resulting in considerable alterations, limitations and emotional impact for the afflicted person and his/her family. Both environmental factors and attitudes from the surrounding can contribute to this impact on daily life. Strategies needed to cope with this impact may include both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies, such as struggling, avoiding trigger factors and finding positive aspects.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Quality of Life

Keywords

Attitudes

consequences

content analysis

coping

daily life

sick building syndrome

Journal Title scandinavian journal of psychology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 27532686
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160903
DCOM- 20170322
LR  - 20170322
IS  - 1467-9450 (Electronic)
IS  - 0036-5564 (Linking)
VI  - 57
IP  - 5
DP  - 2016 Oct
TI  - Experience of living with nonspecific building-related symptoms.
PG  - 406-12
LID - 10.1111/sjop.12319 [doi]
AB  - Nonspecific building-related symptoms (NBRS) is a combination of general, skin
      and mucosal symptoms related to certain buildings. Despite high prevalence in the
      general population and severe symptomatology in certain cases there is no
      scientific documentation of quality of life in NBRS. The purpose of this study
      was to illuminate how individuals with NBRS experience daily life. Data were
      collected through descriptive, written texts and through telephone interviews
      with 11 individuals diagnosed with NBRS, and qualitative content analysis was
      conducted. Three main content areas were identified: (1) attitudes from the
      surrounding (categories: being questioned and lack of understanding from others; 
      from zero to full support); (2) consequences (difficulties with daily activities;
      financial difficulties; affecting family and friends; emotional consequences);
      and (3) coping (learning to accept and finding solutions; avoiding; struggling;
      finding the positive; making one's home a sanctuary). As a conclusion, NBRS may
      affect several aspects of daily life, resulting in considerable alterations,
      limitations and emotional impact for the afflicted person and his/her family.
      Both environmental factors and attitudes from the surrounding can contribute to
      this impact on daily life. Strategies needed to cope with this impact may include
      both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies, such as struggling, avoiding
      trigger factors and finding positive aspects.
CI  - (c) 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
FAU - Soderholm, Anna
AU  - Soderholm A
AD  - Department of Psychology, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
FAU - Ohman, Ann
AU  - Ohman A
AD  - Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
AD  - Umea Centre for Gender Studies, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
FAU - Stenberg, Berndt
AU  - Stenberg B
AD  - Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
FAU - Nordin, Steven
AU  - Nordin S
AD  - Department of Psychology, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160817
PL  - England
TA  - Scand J Psychol
JT  - Scandinavian journal of psychology
JID - 0404510
SB  - IM
MH  - Adaptation, Psychological
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Qualitative Research
MH  - *Quality of Life
MH  - Sick Building Syndrome/*psychology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Attitudes
OT  - consequences
OT  - content analysis
OT  - coping
OT  - daily life
OT  - sick building syndrome
EDAT- 2016/08/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/23 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/18 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/16 [received]
PHST- 2016/05/28 [accepted]
AID - 10.1111/sjop.12319 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Scand J Psychol. 2016 Oct;57(5):406-12. doi: 10.1111/sjop.12319. Epub 2016 Aug
      17.

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