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Building-related symptoms are linked to the in vitro toxicity of indoor dust and airborne microbial propagules in schools: A cross-sectional study.

Abstract Indoor microbial toxicity is suspected to cause some building-related symptoms, but supporting epidemiological data are lacking.
PMID
Related Publications
Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Sick Building Syndrome

Keywords

Airborne toxicity, sperm motility

Building-related symptoms

Indoor dust

Indoor toxicity

Journal Title environmental research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28107741
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170120
DCOM- 20170509
LR  - 20170509
IS  - 1096-0953 (Electronic)
IS  - 0013-9351 (Linking)
VI  - 154
DP  - 2017 Apr
TI  - Building-related symptoms are linked to the in vitro toxicity of indoor dust and 
      airborne microbial propagules in schools: A cross-sectional study.
PG  - 234-239
LID - S0013-9351(16)30609-0 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.envres.2017.01.015 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Indoor microbial toxicity is suspected to cause some
      building-related symptoms, but supporting epidemiological data are lacking.
      OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the in vitro toxicity of indoor samples from
      school buildings was associated with work-related health symptoms
      (building-related symptoms, BRS). METHODS: Administrators of the Helsinki City
      Real Estate Department selected 15 schools for the study, and a questionnaire on 
      symptoms connected to work was sent to the teachers in the selected schools for
      voluntary completion. The cellular toxicity of classroom samples was determined
      by testing substances extracted from wiped indoor dust and by testing microbial
      biomass that was cultured on fallout plates. Boar sperm cells were used as
      indicator cells, and motility loss was the indicator for toxic effects. The
      effects were expressed as the half maximal effective concentration (EC50) at
      which >50% of the exposed boar sperm cells were immobile compared to vehicle
      control. RESULTS: Completed symptom questionnaires were received from 232
      teachers [median age, 43 years; 190 (82.3%) women] with a median time of 6 years 
      working at their school. Samples from their classrooms were available and were
      assessed for cellular toxicity. The Poisson regression model showed that the
      impact of extracts of surface-wiped school classroom dust on teacher work-related
      BRS was 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.6-4.9) higher in classrooms with a toxic threshold
      EC50 of 6microgml-1 versus classrooms with insignificant EC50 values (EC50
      >50microgml-1); P<0.001. The number of symptoms that were alleviated during
      vacation was higher in school classrooms with high sperm toxicity compared to
      less toxic sites; the RR was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.3, P=0.03) for wiped dust
      extracts. CONCLUSIONS: Teachers working in classrooms where the samples showed
      high sperm toxicity had more BRS. The boar sperm cell motility inhibition assay
      appears promising as a tool for demonstrating the presence of indoor substances
      associated with BRS.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Salin, J T
AU  - Salin JT
AD  - Department of Infection Control, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
FAU - Salkinoja-Salonen, M
AU  - Salkinoja-Salonen M
AD  - Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, FI 00014 University of Helsinki,
      Finland; Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University,
      Espoo, Finland.
FAU - Salin, P J
AU  - Salin PJ
AD  - Oulu University Hospital, Inspector Sec Oy Laboratories, Oulu, Finland;
      Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, FI 00014 University of Helsinki,
      Finland.
FAU - Nelo, K
AU  - Nelo K
AD  - Oulu University Hospital, Inspector Sec Oy Laboratories, Oulu, Finland.
FAU - Holma, T
AU  - Holma T
AD  - Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University
      Hospital, Finland; PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland; Medical
      Research Center Oulu, Finland.
FAU - Ohtonen, P
AU  - Ohtonen P
AD  - Division of Operative Care and Medical Research Center, Finland.
FAU - Syrjala, H
AU  - Syrjala H
AD  - Department of Infection Control, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170117
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Environ Res
JT  - Environmental research
JID - 0147621
RN  - 0 (Dust)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Air Microbiology
MH  - Air Pollution, Indoor/*adverse effects/analysis
MH  - Animals
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Dust/analysis
MH  - Environmental Monitoring
MH  - Female
MH  - Finland
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects/analysis
MH  - School Teachers/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Schools/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - *Sick Building Syndrome/epidemiology
MH  - Sperm Motility/*drug effects
MH  - Spermatozoa/*drug effects
MH  - Swine
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Airborne toxicity, sperm motility
OT  - Building-related symptoms
OT  - Indoor dust
OT  - Indoor toxicity
EDAT- 2017/01/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/21 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/16 [received]
PHST- 2017/01/10 [revised]
PHST- 2017/01/12 [accepted]
AID - S0013-9351(16)30609-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.envres.2017.01.015 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:234-239. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2017.01.015. Epub 2017
      Jan 17.

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