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Etiology of acute otitis media and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in Chilean children <5 years of age.

Abstract The impact of bacterial conjugate vaccines on acute otitis media (AOM) is affected by several factors including population characteristics, bacterial etiology and vaccine conjugation method, carrier, and coverage. This study estimated the baseline etiology, distribution, and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial serotypes that causes AOM in children aged <5 years in a public setting in Santiago, Chile.Children aged ≥3 months and <5 years referred to the physician for treatment of AOM episodes (with an onset of symptoms <72 h) were enrolled between September 2009 and September 2010. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was collected by tympanocentesis or by otorrhea for identification and serotyping of bacteria. Antibacterial susceptibility was tested using E-test (etrack: 112671).Of 160 children (mean age 27.10 ± 15.83 months) with AOM episodes, 164 MEF samples (1 episode each from 156 children; 2 episodes each from 4 children) were collected. Nearly 30% of AOM episodes occurred in children aged 12 to 23 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (41.7% [58/139]) and Haemophilus influenzae (40.3% [56/139]) were predominant among the cultures that showed bacterial growth (85% [139/164]). All Streptococcus pneumoniae positive episodes were serotyped, 19F (21%) and 14 (17%) were the predominant serotypes; all Haemophilus influenzae strains were nontypeable. Streptococcus pneumoniae were resistant to penicillin (5%) and erythromycin (33%); Haemophilus influenzae were resistant to ampicillin (14%) and cefuroxime and cefotaxime (2% each).AOM in Chilean children is predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Use of a broad spectrum vaccine against these pathogens might aid the reduction of AOM in Chile.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28178138
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170208
LR  - 20170208
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 6
DP  - 2017 Feb
TI  - Etiology of acute otitis media and serotype distribution of Streptococcus
      pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in Chilean children &lt;5 years of age.
PG  - e5974
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000005974 [doi]
AB  - The impact of bacterial conjugate vaccines on acute otitis media (AOM) is
      affected by several factors including population characteristics, bacterial
      etiology and vaccine conjugation method, carrier, and coverage. This study
      estimated the baseline etiology, distribution, and antibiotic susceptibility of
      bacterial serotypes that causes AOM in children aged &lt;5 years in a public setting
      in Santiago, Chile.Children aged &gt;/=3 months and &lt;5 years referred to the
      physician for treatment of AOM episodes (with an onset of symptoms &lt;72 h) were
      enrolled between September 2009 and September 2010. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was
      collected by tympanocentesis or by otorrhea for identification and serotyping of 
      bacteria. Antibacterial susceptibility was tested using E-test (etrack:
      112671).Of 160 children (mean age 27.10 +/- 15.83 months) with AOM episodes, 164 
      MEF samples (1 episode each from 156 children; 2 episodes each from 4 children)
      were collected. Nearly 30% of AOM episodes occurred in children aged 12 to 23
      months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (41.7% [58/139]) and Haemophilus influenzae
      (40.3% [56/139]) were predominant among the cultures that showed bacterial growth
      (85% [139/164]). All Streptococcus pneumoniae positive episodes were serotyped,
      19F (21%) and 14 (17%) were the predominant serotypes; all Haemophilus influenzae
      strains were nontypeable. Streptococcus pneumoniae were resistant to penicillin
      (5%) and erythromycin (33%); Haemophilus influenzae were resistant to ampicillin 
      (14%) and cefuroxime and cefotaxime (2% each).AOM in Chilean children is
      predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus
      influenzae. Use of a broad spectrum vaccine against these pathogens might aid the
      reduction of AOM in Chile.
FAU - Rosenblut, Andres
AU  - Rosenblut A
AD  - aUnidad de Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital Sotero del Rio, Puente Alto, Santiago, 
      Chile bMerck &amp; Co, Sao Paulo, Brazil; at the time of the study Takeda
      Pharmaceuticals, Sao Paulo, Brazil cGSK Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Bangalore, India
      dGSK Buenos Aires, Argentina eGSK Panama, Panama.
FAU - Napolitano, Carla
AU  - Napolitano C
FAU - Pereira, Angelica
AU  - Pereira A
FAU - Moreno, Camilo
AU  - Moreno C
FAU - Kolhe, Devayani
AU  - Kolhe D
FAU - Lepetic, Alejandro
AU  - Lepetic A
FAU - Ortega-Barria, Eduardo
AU  - Ortega-Barria E
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/02/09 06:00
MHDA- 2017/02/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/09 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000005974 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201702100-00019 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Feb;96(6):e5974. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000005974.

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