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Multiple Viral Infection Detected from Influenza-Like Illness Cases in Indonesia.

Abstract Influenza is one of the common etiologies of the upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). However, influenza virus only contributes about 20 percent of influenza-like illness patients. The aim of the study is to investigate the other viral etiologies from ILI cases in Indonesia. Of the 334 samples, 266 samples (78%) were positive at least for one virus, including 107 (42%) cases of multiple infections. Influenza virus is the most detected virus. The most frequent combination of viruses identified was adenovirus and human rhinovirus. This recent study demonstrated high detection rate of several respiratory viruses from ILI cases in Indonesia. Further studies to determine the relationship between viruses and clinical features are needed to improve respiratory disease control program.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title biomed research international
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28232948
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170224
DCOM- 20170306
LR  - 20170306
IS  - 2314-6141 (Electronic)
VI  - 2017
DP  - 2017
TI  - Multiple Viral Infection Detected from Influenza-Like Illness Cases in Indonesia.
PG  - 9541619
LID - 10.1155/2017/9541619 [doi]
AB  - Influenza is one of the common etiologies of the upper respiratory tract
      infection (URTI). However, influenza virus only contributes about 20 percent of
      influenza-like illness patients. The aim of the study is to investigate the other
      viral etiologies from ILI cases in Indonesia. Of the 334 samples, 266 samples
      (78%) were positive at least for one virus, including 107 (42%) cases of multiple
      infections. Influenza virus is the most detected virus. The most frequent
      combination of viruses identified was adenovirus and human rhinovirus. This
      recent study demonstrated high detection rate of several respiratory viruses from
      ILI cases in Indonesia. Further studies to determine the relationship between
      viruses and clinical features are needed to improve respiratory disease control
      program.
FAU - Adam, Kindi
AU  - Adam K
AD  - Research and Development Center for Biomedical and Basic Health Technology,
      Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Pangesti, Krisna Nur Andriana
AU  - Pangesti KN
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-6339-915X
AD  - Research and Development Center for Biomedical and Basic Health Technology,
      Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Setiawaty, Vivi
AU  - Setiawaty V
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-1196-7909
AD  - Research and Development Center for Biomedical and Basic Health Technology,
      Jakarta, Indonesia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170123
PL  - United States
TA  - Biomed Res Int
JT  - BioMed research international
JID - 101600173
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Coinfection/*epidemiology/*virology
MH  - Female
MH  - Geography
MH  - Humans
MH  - Indonesia/epidemiology
MH  - Infant
MH  - Influenza, Human/*epidemiology/*virology
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Sentinel Surveillance
MH  - Specimen Handling
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5292373
COI - The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the
      publication of this paper.
EDAT- 2017/02/25 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/25 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/27 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/22 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/13 [accepted]
AID - 10.1155/2017/9541619 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:9541619. doi: 10.1155/2017/9541619. Epub 2017 Jan 23.

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