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Relationship Between Patient-Reported Assessment of Shoulder Function and Objective Range-of-Motion Measurements.

Abstract Assessment of function is the cornerstone of clinical shoulder research. This purpose of this study was to answer 3 relevant questions: How does subjective patient assessment of shoulder function correlate with objectively measured active shoulder range of motion? What is the difference in active motion between shoulders that can and those that cannot be used to perform each of the functions of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST)? Does the relationship between subjective and objective assessment of shoulder function differ between male and female patients?
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Range of Motion, Articular

Self-Assessment

Keywords
Journal Title the journal of bone and joint surgery. american volume
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28244913
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170228
DCOM- 20170308
LR  - 20170308
IS  - 1535-1386 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-9355 (Linking)
VI  - 99
IP  - 5
DP  - 2017 Mar 01
TI  - Relationship Between Patient-Reported Assessment of Shoulder Function and
      Objective Range-of-Motion Measurements.
PG  - 417-426
LID - 10.2106/JBJS.16.00556 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Assessment of function is the cornerstone of clinical shoulder
      research. This purpose of this study was to answer 3 relevant questions: How does
      subjective patient assessment of shoulder function correlate with objectively
      measured active shoulder range of motion? What is the difference in active motion
      between shoulders that can and those that cannot be used to perform each of the
      functions of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST)? Does the relationship between
      subjective and objective assessment of shoulder function differ between male and 
      female patients? METHODS: We analyzed the relationship between objective
      range-of-motion measurements recorded by the observer-independent Kinect motion
      capture system and SST patient self-assessments of shoulder function of 74 male
      and 30 female patients with osteoarthritis. RESULTS: There was poor correlation
      between objective measurements of active abduction and total SST scores of
      osteoarthritic shoulders of patients seen before shoulder surgery: the
      coefficients of determination (R) were 0.29 for the osteoarthritic shoulders of
      women and 0.25 for those of men. The relationships between active abduction and
      total SST score were closer for the contralateral shoulders (R = 0.54 for women
      and R = 0.46 for men). The difference in active abduction between the
      osteoarthritic shoulders that allowed and those that did not allow the patient to
      perform the individual SST functions was significant (p < 0.05) for only 4 of the
      12 functions in the female group and 5 of 12 in the male group because of the
      highly variable relationship between self-assessed function and active abduction.
      In contrast, when the contralateral shoulders were assessed, this difference was 
      found to be significant for 10 of the 12 functions in the female group and all 12
      of the functions in the male group. The relationship between objective motion and
      subjective function did not differ significantly between male and female
      subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The self-assessed function of osteoarthritic shoulders of 
      women and men is only partially determined by the active range of abduction. Both
      subjective and objective measurements are important in characterizing the
      clinical status of shoulders. Studies of treatment outcomes should include
      separate assessments of these 2 complementary aspects of shoulder function. LEVEL
      OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete
      description of levels of evidence.
FAU - Matsen, Frederick A 3rd
AU  - Matsen FA 3rd
AD  - 1Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington Medical
      Center, Seattle, Washington.
FAU - Tang, Anna
AU  - Tang A
FAU - Russ, Stacy M
AU  - Russ SM
FAU - Hsu, Jason E
AU  - Hsu JE
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Bone Joint Surg Am
JT  - The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
JID - 0014030
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Arthroplasty, Replacement
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Observer Variation
MH  - Osteoarthritis/*diagnosis/*physiopathology/surgery
MH  - *Range of Motion, Articular
MH  - *Self-Assessment
MH  - Sex Factors
MH  - Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology/surgery
EDAT- 2017/03/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/01 06:00
AID - 10.2106/JBJS.16.00556 [doi]
AID - 00004623-201703010-00008 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2017 Mar 1;99(5):417-426. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.16.00556.

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