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Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

Abstract Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Brain

Multiple Sclerosis

Keywords

EPSI

Fast MRSI

Human

In vivo

Multiple Sclerosis

Spiral

Journal Title journal of biomedical science
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28245815
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170301
DCOM- 20170310
LR  - 20170310
IS  - 1423-0127 (Electronic)
IS  - 1021-7770 (Linking)
VI  - 24
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 28
TI  - Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain-
      applications in multiple sclerosis.
PG  - 17
LID - 10.1186/s12929-017-0323-2 [doi]
AB  - Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important
      imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the
      human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in
      neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke
      and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer
      acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the
      brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI
      more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar,
      parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief
      introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination (1H-MRS) and localization 
      techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from
      their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on
      their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of
      pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic
      techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human
      brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good
      example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI
      application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and
      relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.
FAU - Al-Iedani, Oun
AU  - Al-Iedani O
AD  - School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of
      Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.
FAU - Lechner-Scott, Jeannette
AU  - Lechner-Scott J
AD  - School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University 
      of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.
AD  - Department of Neurology, John Hunter Hospital, Lookout Road, New Lambton, NSW
      2305, Australia.
AD  - Hunter Medical Research Institute, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton, NSW 2305,
      Australia.
FAU - Ribbons, Karen
AU  - Ribbons K
AD  - Department of Neurology, John Hunter Hospital, Lookout Road, New Lambton, NSW
      2305, Australia.
FAU - Ramadan, Saadallah
AU  - Ramadan S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3874-7866
AD  - School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of
      Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170228
PL  - England
TA  - J Biomed Sci
JT  - Journal of biomedical science
JID - 9421567
SB  - IM
MH  - *Brain/diagnostic imaging/metabolism
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/*methods
MH  - Male
MH  - *Multiple Sclerosis/diagnostic imaging/metabolism
PMC - PMC5331701
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - EPSI
OT  - Fast MRSI
OT  - Human
OT  - In vivo
OT  - Multiple Sclerosis
OT  - Spiral
EDAT- 2017/03/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/02 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/14 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/08 [accepted]
AID - 10.1186/s12929-017-0323-2 [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s12929-017-0323-2 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - J Biomed Sci. 2017 Feb 28;24(1):17. doi: 10.1186/s12929-017-0323-2.

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