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Host-pathogen interplay at primary infection sites in pigs challenged with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

Abstract Actinobacillus (A.) pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia and causes significant losses in the pig industry worldwide. Early host immune response is crucial for further progression of the disease. A. pleuropneumoniae is either rapidly eliminated by the immune system or switches to a long-term persistent form. To gain insight into the host-pathogen interaction during the early stages of infection, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 and humanely euthanized eight hours after infection. Gene expression studies of inflammatory cytokines and the acute phase proteins haptoglobin, serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein were carried out by RT-qPCR from the lung, liver, tonsils and salivary gland. In addition, the concentration of cytokines and acute phase proteins were measured by quantitative immunoassays in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum and saliva. In parallel to the analyses of host response, the impact of the host on the bacterial pathogen was assessed on a metabolic level. For the latter, Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR-) spectroscopy was employed.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

Keywords

Acute phase proteins

Early immune response

FTIR

Gene expression

Salivary gland

Journal Title bmc veterinary research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28245826
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170301
DCOM- 20170313
LR  - 20170313
IS  - 1746-6148 (Electronic)
IS  - 1746-6148 (Linking)
VI  - 13
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 28
TI  - Host-pathogen interplay at primary infection sites in pigs challenged with
      Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.
PG  - 64
LID - 10.1186/s12917-017-0979-6 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Actinobacillus (A.) pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of
      porcine pleuropneumonia and causes significant losses in the pig industry
      worldwide. Early host immune response is crucial for further progression of the
      disease. A. pleuropneumoniae is either rapidly eliminated by the immune system or
      switches to a long-term persistent form. To gain insight into the host-pathogen
      interaction during the early stages of infection, pigs were inoculated
      intratracheally with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 and humanely euthanized eight
      hours after infection. Gene expression studies of inflammatory cytokines and the 
      acute phase proteins haptoglobin, serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein were
      carried out by RT-qPCR from the lung, liver, tonsils and salivary gland. In
      addition, the concentration of cytokines and acute phase proteins were measured
      by quantitative immunoassays in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum and saliva.
      In parallel to the analyses of host response, the impact of the host on the
      bacterial pathogen was assessed on a metabolic level. For the latter,
      Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR-) spectroscopy was employed. RESULTS:
      Significant cytokine and acute phase protein gene expression was detected in the 
      lung and the salivary gland however this was not observed in the tonsils. In
      parallel to the analyses of host response, the impact of the host on the
      bacterial pathogen was assessed on a metabolic level. For the latter
      investigations, Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR-) spectroscopy was employed. The
      bacteria isolated from the upper and lower respiratory tract showed distinct IR
      spectral patterns reflecting the organ-specific acute phase response of the host.
      CONCLUSIONS: In summary, this study implies a metabolic adaptation of A.
      pleuropneumoniae to the porcine upper respiratory tract already during early
      infection, which might indicate a first step towards the persistence of A.
      pleuropneumoniae. Not only in lung, but also in the salivary gland an increased
      inflammatory gene expression was detectable during the acute stage of infection.
FAU - Sassu, Elena L
AU  - Sassu EL
AD  - University Clinic for Swine, Department of Farm Animals and Veterinary Public
      Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Frombling, Janna
AU  - Frombling J
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Functional Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology,
      University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Duvigneau, J Catharina
AU  - Duvigneau JC
AD  - Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Medical Biochemistry, University
      of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Miller, Ingrid
AU  - Miller I
AD  - Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Medical Biochemistry, University
      of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Mullebner, Andrea
AU  - Mullebner A
AD  - Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Medical Biochemistry, University
      of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Gutierrez, Ana M
AU  - Gutierrez AM
AD  - Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
FAU - Grunert, Tom
AU  - Grunert T
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Functional Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology,
      University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Patzl, Martina
AU  - Patzl M
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Immunology, University of Veterinary
      Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Saalmuller, Armin
AU  - Saalmuller A
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Immunology, University of Veterinary
      Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - von Altrock, Alexandra
AU  - von Altrock A
AD  - Forensic Medicine and Ambulatory Services, Clinic for Swine and Small Ruminants, 
      University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
FAU - Menzel, Anne
AU  - Menzel A
AD  - Forensic Medicine and Ambulatory Services, Clinic for Swine and Small Ruminants, 
      University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
FAU - Ganter, Martin
AU  - Ganter M
AD  - Forensic Medicine and Ambulatory Services, Clinic for Swine and Small Ruminants, 
      University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
FAU - Spergser, Joachim
AU  - Spergser J
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Functional Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology,
      University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion
AU  - Hewicker-Trautwein M
AD  - Department of Pathology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover,
      Germany.
FAU - Verspohl, Jutta
AU  - Verspohl J
AD  - Institute for Microbiology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover,
      Germany.
FAU - Ehling-Schulz, Monika
AU  - Ehling-Schulz M
AD  - Department of Pathobiology, Functional Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology,
      University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Hennig-Pauka, Isabel
AU  - Hennig-Pauka I
AD  - University Clinic for Swine, Department of Farm Animals and Veterinary Public
      Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170228
PL  - England
TA  - BMC Vet Res
JT  - BMC veterinary research
JID - 101249759
RN  - 0 (Cytokines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Actinobacillus Infections/immunology/metabolism/microbiology/*veterinary
MH  - *Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae/immunology/isolation & purification/metabolism
MH  - Animals
MH  - Cytokines/metabolism
MH  - Pleuropneumonia/immunology/metabolism/microbiology/*veterinary
MH  - Swine
MH  - Swine Diseases/immunology/metabolism/*microbiology
MH  - Transcriptome
PMC - PMC5329957
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Acute phase proteins
OT  - Early immune response
OT  - FTIR
OT  - Gene expression
OT  - Salivary gland
EDAT- 2017/03/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/02 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/13 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/16 [accepted]
AID - 10.1186/s12917-017-0979-6 [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s12917-017-0979-6 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMC Vet Res. 2017 Feb 28;13(1):64. doi: 10.1186/s12917-017-0979-6.

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