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Detection of Schistosoma Antibodies and exploration of associated factors among local residents around Inlay Lake, Southern Shan State, Myanmar.

Abstract Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by blood flukes (trematode worms) of the genus Schistosoma. Its transmission has been reported in 78 countries affecting at least 258 million people world-wide. It was documented that S. japonicum species was prevalent in Shan State, Myanmar, but the serological study was not conducted yet. General objective of the present study was to detect schistosoma antibodies and explore associated factors among local residents living around Inlay Lake, Nyaung Shwe Township, and Southern Shan State, Myanmar.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Associated factors

Elisa

Inlay Lake

Myanmar

Schistosomiasis

Seroprevalence

Journal Title infectious diseases of poverty
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28245867
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170301
DCOM- 20170306
LR  - 20170307
IS  - 2049-9957 (Electronic)
IS  - 2049-9957 (Linking)
VI  - 6
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Mar 01
TI  - Detection of Schistosoma Antibodies and exploration of associated factors among
      local residents around Inlay Lake, Southern Shan State, Myanmar.
PG  - 3
LID - 10.1186/s40249-016-0211-0 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by blood flukes
      (trematode worms) of the genus Schistosoma. Its transmission has been reported in
      78 countries affecting at least 258 million people world-wide. It was documented 
      that S. japonicum species was prevalent in Shan State, Myanmar, but the
      serological study was not conducted yet. General objective of the present study
      was to detect schistosoma antibodies and explore associated factors among local
      residents living around Inlay Lake, Nyaung Shwe Township, and Southern Shan
      State, Myanmar. METHODS: An exploratory and cross-sectional analytic study was
      conducted among local residents (n = 315) in selected rural health center (RHC)
      areas from December 2012 through June 2013. The participants were interviewed
      with pretested semi-structured questionnaires and their blood samples (serum)
      were tested using Schistosomiasis Serology Microwell ELISA test kits (sensitivity
      100% and specificity 85%) which detected IgG antibodies but could not distinguish
      between a new and past infection. Data collected were analysed by SPSS software
      16.0 and associations of variables were determined by Chi-squared test with a
      significant level set at 0.05. RESULTS: Schistosoma seroprevalence (IgG) in study
      area was found to be 23.8% (95% CI: 18.8-28.8%). The present study is the first
      and foremost study producing serological evidence of schistosoma infection-one of
      the neglected tropical diseases-in local people of Myanmar. The factors
      significantly associated with seropositivity were being male [OR = 2.6 (95% CI:
      1.5-4.49), P < 0.001], residence [OR = 3.41 (95% CI: 1.6-7.3), P < 0.05 for
      Khaung Daing vs. Min Chaung] and education levels [OR = 4.5 (95% CI: 1.18-17.16),
      P < 0.05 for illiterate/3Rs level vs. high/graduate and OR = 3.16 (95% CI:
      1.26-7.93), P < 0.05 for primary/middle level vs. high/graduate] all factors
      classically associated with risk of schistosoma infection. None of the
      behavioural factors tested were significantly associated with seropositivity.
      CONCLUSION: Schistosoma infection serologically detected was most probably
      present at some time in this location of Myanmar, and this should be further
      confirmed parasitologically and kept under surveillance. Proper trainings on
      diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control of schistosomiasis should be
      provided to the healthcare providers. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN ISRCTN73824458 .
      Registered 28 September 2014, retrospectively registered.
FAU - Soe, Htin Zaw
AU  - Soe HZ
AD  - University of Community Health, Magway, Myanmar. drhzsoe@gmail.com.
FAU - Oo, Cho Cho
AU  - Oo CC
AD  - University of Medicine (Mandalay), Mandalay, Myanmar.
FAU - Myat, Tin Ohn
AU  - Myat TO
AD  - University of Medicine (I), Yangon, Myanmar.
FAU - Maung, Nay Soe
AU  - Maung NS
AD  - University of Public Health, Yangon, Myanmar.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170301
PL  - England
TA  - Infect Dis Poverty
JT  - Infectious diseases of poverty
JID - 101606645
RN  - 0 (Antibodies, Helminth)
RN  - 0 (Immunoglobulin G)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Animals
MH  - Antibodies, Helminth/*blood
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunoglobulin G/blood
MH  - Lakes
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Myanmar/epidemiology
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Schistosoma/*immunology
MH  - Schistosomiasis/*epidemiology
MH  - Seroepidemiologic Studies
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5331719
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Associated factors
OT  - Elisa
OT  - Inlay Lake
OT  - Myanmar
OT  - Schistosomiasis
OT  - Seroprevalence
EDAT- 2017/03/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/02 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/04 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/07 [accepted]
AID - 10.1186/s40249-016-0211-0 [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s40249-016-0211-0 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Infect Dis Poverty. 2017 Mar 1;6(1):3. doi: 10.1186/s40249-016-0211-0.

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