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Response to a Large Polio Outbreak in a Setting of Conflict - Middle East, 2013-2015.

Abstract As the world advances toward the eradication of polio, outbreaks of wild poliovirus (WPV) in polio-free regions pose a substantial risk to the timeline for global eradication. Countries and regions experiencing active conflict, chronic insecurity, and large-scale displacement of persons are particularly vulnerable to outbreaks because of the disruption of health care and immunization services (1). A polio outbreak occurred in the Middle East, beginning in Syria in 2013 with subsequent spread to Iraq (2). The outbreak occurred 2 years after the onset of the Syrian civil war, resulted in 38 cases, and was the first time WPV was detected in Syria in approximately a decade (3,4). The national governments of eight countries designated the outbreak a public health emergency and collaborated with partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to develop a multiphase outbreak response plan focused on improving the quality of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance* and administering polio vaccines to >27 million children during multiple rounds of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs).(†) Successful implementation of the response plan led to containment and interruption of the outbreak within 6 months of its identification. The concerted approach adopted in response to this outbreak could serve as a model for responding to polio outbreaks in settings of conflict and political instability.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Warfare

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28253229
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170302
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Mar 03
TI  - Response to a Large Polio Outbreak in a Setting of Conflict - Middle East,
      2013-2015.
PG  - 227-231
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a6 [doi]
AB  - As the world advances toward the eradication of polio, outbreaks of wild
      poliovirus (WPV) in polio-free regions pose a substantial risk to the timeline
      for global eradication. Countries and regions experiencing active conflict,
      chronic insecurity, and large-scale displacement of persons are particularly
      vulnerable to outbreaks because of the disruption of health care and immunization
      services (1). A polio outbreak occurred in the Middle East, beginning in Syria in
      2013 with subsequent spread to Iraq (2). The outbreak occurred 2 years after the 
      onset of the Syrian civil war, resulted in 38 cases, and was the first time WPV
      was detected in Syria in approximately a decade (3,4). The national governments
      of eight countries designated the outbreak a public health emergency and
      collaborated with partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to
      develop a multiphase outbreak response plan focused on improving the quality of
      acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance* and administering polio vaccines to
      >27 million children during multiple rounds of supplementary immunization
      activities (SIAs).dagger Successful implementation of the response plan led to
      containment and interruption of the outbreak within 6 months of its
      identification. The concerted approach adopted in response to this outbreak could
      serve as a model for responding to polio outbreaks in settings of conflict and
      political instability.
FAU - Mbaeyi, Chukwuma
AU  - Mbaeyi C
FAU - Ryan, Michael J
AU  - Ryan MJ
FAU - Smith, Philip
AU  - Smith P
FAU - Mahamud, Abdirahman
AU  - Mahamud A
FAU - Farag, Noha
AU  - Farag N
FAU - Haithami, Salah
AU  - Haithami S
FAU - Sharaf, Magdi
AU  - Sharaf M
FAU - Jorba, Jaume C
AU  - Jorba JC
FAU - Ehrhardt, Derek
AU  - Ehrhardt D
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170303
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
RN  - 0 (Poliovirus Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Disease Outbreaks/*prevention & control
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunization Programs
MH  - Middle East/epidemiology
MH  - Poliomyelitis/epidemiology/*prevention & control
MH  - Poliovirus/isolation & purification
MH  - Poliovirus Vaccines/administration & dosage
MH  - *Warfare
EDAT- 2017/03/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/03 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a6 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Mar 3;66(8):227-231. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a6.

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