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Baseline Prevalence of Birth Defects Associated with Congenital Zika Virus Infection - Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia, 2013-2014.

Abstract Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3). These data, from Massachusetts (2013), North Carolina (2013), and Atlanta, Georgia (2013-2014), included 747 infants and fetuses with one or more of the birth defects meeting the case definition (pre-Zika prevalence = 2.86 per 1,000 live births). Brain abnormalities or microcephaly were the most frequently recorded (1.50 per 1,000), followed by neural tube defects and other early brain malformations(†) (0.88), eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality (0.31), and other consequences of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction without mention of brain or eye abnormalities (0.17). During January 15-September 22, 2016, the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) reported 26 infants and fetuses with these same defects among 442 completed pregnancies (58.8 per 1,000) born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (2). Although the ascertainment methods differed, this finding was approximately 20 times higher than the proportion of one or more of the same birth defects among pregnancies during the pre-Zika years. These data demonstrate the importance of population-based surveillance for interpreting data about birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.
PMID
Related Publications

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Birth Defects Among Fetuses and Infants of US Women With Evidence of Possible Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28253231
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170302
LR  - 20170302
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Mar 03
TI  - Baseline Prevalence of Birth Defects Associated with Congenital Zika Virus
      Infection - Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia, 2013-2014.
PG  - 219-222
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a4 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but 
      the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the
      impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance
      case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika
      virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth
      defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the
      introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health
      Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3). These data, from
      Massachusetts (2013), North Carolina (2013), and Atlanta, Georgia (2013-2014),
      included 747 infants and fetuses with one or more of the birth defects meeting
      the case definition (pre-Zika prevalence = 2.86 per 1,000 live births). Brain
      abnormalities or microcephaly were the most frequently recorded (1.50 per 1,000),
      followed by neural tube defects and other early brain malformationsdagger (0.88),
      eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality (0.31), and other
      consequences of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction without mention of brain
      or eye abnormalities (0.17). During January 15-September 22, 2016, the U.S. Zika 
      Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) reported 26 infants and fetuses with these same
      defects among 442 completed pregnancies (58.8 per 1,000) born to mothers with
      laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (2).
      Although the ascertainment methods differed, this finding was approximately 20
      times higher than the proportion of one or more of the same birth defects among
      pregnancies during the pre-Zika years. These data demonstrate the importance of
      population-based surveillance for interpreting data about birth defects
      potentially related to Zika virus infection.
FAU - Cragan, Janet D
AU  - Cragan JD
FAU - Mai, Cara T
AU  - Mai CT
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Liberman, Rebecca F
AU  - Liberman RF
FAU - Forestieri, Nina E
AU  - Forestieri NE
FAU - Stevens, Alissa C
AU  - Stevens AC
FAU - Delaney, Augustina
AU  - Delaney A
FAU - Dawson, April L
AU  - Dawson AL
FAU - Ellington, Sascha R
AU  - Ellington SR
FAU - Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K
AU  - Shapiro-Mendoza CK
FAU - Dunn, Julie E
AU  - Dunn JE
FAU - Higgins, Cathleen A
AU  - Higgins CA
FAU - Meyer, Robert E
AU  - Meyer RE
FAU - Williams, Tonya
AU  - Williams T
FAU - Polen, Kara N D
AU  - Polen KN
FAU - Newsome, Kim
AU  - Newsome K
FAU - Reynolds, Megan
AU  - Reynolds M
FAU - Isenburg, Jennifer
AU  - Isenburg J
FAU - Gilboa, Suzanne M
AU  - Gilboa SM
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana M
AU  - Meaney-Delman DM
FAU - Moore, Cynthia A
AU  - Moore CA
FAU - Boyle, Coleen A
AU  - Boyle CA
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170303
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
EDAT- 2017/03/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/03 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a4 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Mar 3;66(8):219-222. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6608a4.

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