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A Single Case of Tourette's Syndrome Treated with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Abstract The objective of this case study was to investigate the effectiveness of Chinese medicine in treating Tourette's syndrome. Tourette's syndrome is a childhood- onset disorder that is characterized by sudden, involuntary movements or tics. The participant in this study was a 33-year-old male who had been diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome at the age of 9 years. His major complaints included facial tics, shoulder shrugging, and clearing the throat. Using a combination of acupuncture, herbs, Gua-Sha, and lifestyle changes once a week for 35 treatments, all the symptoms were reduced by 70%, as reported by the patient. In this case, the results indicated that Chinese medicine was able to minimize the symptoms of Tourette's syndrome. Further investigation is needed to support this argument. Tourette's syndrome, which was first described in 1885 by a French physician named Gilles de la Tourette, is characterized by facial tics, involuntary body movements from the head to the extremities, or vocal tics, and it usually has its onset in childhood. It is a neuropsychiatric disorder. The treatment for Tourette's syndrome is based on pharmacological treatment, behavior treatment, and deep brain stimulation. Unfortunately, none of these could completely control the symptoms; furthermore, antipsychiatric drugs might cause additional side effects, such as Parkinson symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and metabolic disturbances. Finding acupuncture and oriental medicine literature on treatment of Tourette's syndrome was difficult, especially that written in English. Some research papers that have been translated into English indicated that Chinese herbs and acupuncture could reduce the tics significantly. For example, a study by Dr Pao-Hua Lin reported the significant effects of using acupuncture and oriental medicine in treating 1000 Tourette's syndrome cases. This case was treated to further investigate the principles of Dr Lin's study.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Medicine, Chinese Traditional

Tourette Syndrome

Keywords

Gua-Sha

Parkinson's

Tourette's

chorea

neuropsychiatric

tics

Journal Title journal of acupuncture and meridian studies
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28254105
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170303
DCOM- 20170313
LR  - 20170313
IS  - 2093-8152 (Electronic)
IS  - 2005-2901 (Linking)
VI  - 10
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Jan
TI  - A Single Case of Tourette's Syndrome Treated with Traditional Chinese Medicine.
PG  - 55-61
LID - S2005-2901(16)30125-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jams.2016.12.005 [doi]
AB  - The objective of this case study was to investigate the effectiveness of Chinese 
      medicine in treating Tourette's syndrome. Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-
      onset disorder that is characterized by sudden, involuntary movements or tics.
      The participant in this study was a 33-year-old male who had been diagnosed with 
      Tourette's syndrome at the age of 9 years. His major complaints included facial
      tics, shoulder shrugging, and clearing the throat. Using a combination of
      acupuncture, herbs, Gua-Sha, and lifestyle changes once a week for 35 treatments,
      all the symptoms were reduced by 70%, as reported by the patient. In this case,
      the results indicated that Chinese medicine was able to minimize the symptoms of 
      Tourette's syndrome. Further investigation is needed to support this argument.
      Tourette's syndrome, which was first described in 1885 by a French physician
      named Gilles de la Tourette, is characterized by facial tics, involuntary body
      movements from the head to the extremities, or vocal tics, and it usually has its
      onset in childhood. It is a neuropsychiatric disorder. The treatment for
      Tourette's syndrome is based on pharmacological treatment, behavior treatment,
      and deep brain stimulation. Unfortunately, none of these could completely control
      the symptoms; furthermore, antipsychiatric drugs might cause additional side
      effects, such as Parkinson symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and metabolic
      disturbances. Finding acupuncture and oriental medicine literature on treatment
      of Tourette's syndrome was difficult, especially that written in English. Some
      research papers that have been translated into English indicated that Chinese
      herbs and acupuncture could reduce the tics significantly. For example, a study
      by Dr Pao-Hua Lin reported the significant effects of using acupuncture and
      oriental medicine in treating 1000 Tourette's syndrome cases. This case was
      treated to further investigate the principles of Dr Lin's study.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published
      by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Lee, Min-Hwa
AU  - Lee MH
AD  - DAOM, Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, Portland, OR, United States.
      Electronic address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20161218
PL  - Korea (South)
TA  - J Acupunct Meridian Stud
JT  - Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies
JID - 101490763
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Medicine, Chinese Traditional
MH  - *Tourette Syndrome/physiopathology/therapy
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - *Gua-Sha
OT  - *Parkinson's
OT  - *Tourette's
OT  - *chorea
OT  - *neuropsychiatric
OT  - *tics
EDAT- 2017/03/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/04 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/14 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/13 [accepted]
AID - S2005-2901(16)30125-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jams.2016.12.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Acupunct Meridian Stud. 2017 Jan;10(1):55-61. doi: 10.1016/j.jams.2016.12.005. 
      Epub 2016 Dec 18.

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