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Complications during pregnancy and fetal development: implications for the occurrence of chronic kidney disease.

Abstract Numerous epidemiological studies indicate an inverse association between birth weight and the risk for chronic kidney disease. Areas covered: Historically, the first studies to address the developmental origins of chronic disease focused on the inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure. A reduction in nephron number was a consistent finding in low birth weight individuals and experimental models of developmental insult. Recent studies indicate that a congenital reduction in renal reserve in conjunction with an increase in blood pressure that has its origins in fetal life increases vulnerability to renal injury and disease. Expert commentary: Limited experimental studies have investigated the mechanisms that contribute to the developmental origins of kidney disease. Several studies suggest that enhanced susceptibility to renal injury following a developmental insult is altered by sex and age. More in-depth studies are needed to clarify how low birth weight contributes to enhanced renal risk, and how sex and age influence this adverse relationship.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Developmental origins

IUGR

chronic kidney disease

hypertension

low birth weight

nephron number

Journal Title expert review of cardiovascular therapy
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28256177
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170303
DCOM- 20170310
LR  - 20170310
IS  - 1744-8344 (Electronic)
IS  - 1477-9072 (Linking)
VI  - 15
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Mar
TI  - Complications during pregnancy and fetal development: implications for the
      occurrence of chronic kidney disease.
PG  - 211-220
LID - 10.1080/14779072.2017.1294066 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Numerous epidemiological studies indicate an inverse association
      between birth weight and the risk for chronic kidney disease. Areas covered:
      Historically, the first studies to address the developmental origins of chronic
      disease focused on the inverse relationship between birth weight and blood
      pressure. A reduction in nephron number was a consistent finding in low birth
      weight individuals and experimental models of developmental insult. Recent
      studies indicate that a congenital reduction in renal reserve in conjunction with
      an increase in blood pressure that has its origins in fetal life increases
      vulnerability to renal injury and disease. Expert commentary: Limited
      experimental studies have investigated the mechanisms that contribute to the
      developmental origins of kidney disease. Several studies suggest that enhanced
      susceptibility to renal injury following a developmental insult is altered by sex
      and age. More in-depth studies are needed to clarify how low birth weight
      contributes to enhanced renal risk, and how sex and age influence this adverse
      relationship.
FAU - Newsome, Ashley D
AU  - Newsome AD
AD  - a Departments of Physiology and Biophysics , University of Mississippi Medical
      Center , Jackson , MS , USA.
FAU - Davis, Gwendolyn K
AU  - Davis GK
AD  - a Departments of Physiology and Biophysics , University of Mississippi Medical
      Center , Jackson , MS , USA.
FAU - Ojeda, Norma B
AU  - Ojeda NB
AD  - b Pediatrics , University of Mississippi Medical Center , Jackson , MS , USA.
FAU - Alexander, Barbara T
AU  - Alexander BT
AD  - a Departments of Physiology and Biophysics , University of Mississippi Medical
      Center , Jackson , MS , USA.
LA  - eng
GR  - P01 HL051971/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P20 GM104357/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170216
PL  - England
TA  - Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther
JT  - Expert review of cardiovascular therapy
JID - 101182328
SB  - IM
MH  - Birth Weight/*physiology
MH  - Blood Pressure/physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Fetal Development/*physiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypertension/physiopathology
MH  - Infant, Low Birth Weight
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Kidney/physiopathology
MH  - Nephrons/metabolism
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/*epidemiology/etiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - *Developmental origins
OT  - *IUGR
OT  - *chronic kidney disease
OT  - *hypertension
OT  - *low birth weight
OT  - *nephron number
EDAT- 2017/03/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/04 06:00
AID - 10.1080/14779072.2017.1294066 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2017 Mar;15(3):211-220. doi:
      10.1080/14779072.2017.1294066. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

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