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Insight into live bird markets of Bangladesh: an overview of the dynamics of transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

Abstract Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses have been recognized as threats to public health in Bangladesh since 2007. Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been implicated in the transmission, dissemination, and circulation of these viruses, an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of avian transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses at the human-animal interface has been lacking. Here we present and evaluate epidemiological findings from active surveillance conducted among poultry in various production sectors in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2016. Overall, the prevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in collected samples was 24%. Our data show that AIVs are more prevalent in domestic birds within LBMs (30.4%) than in farms (9.6%). Quail, chickens and ducks showed a high prevalence of AIVs (>20%). The vast majority of AIVs detected (99.7%) have come from apparently healthy birds and poultry drinking water served as a reservoir of AIVs with a prevalence of 32.5% in collected samples. HPAI H5N1 was more frequently detected in ducks while H9N2 was more common in chickens and quail. LBMs, particularly wholesale markets, have become a potential reservoir for various types of AIVs, including HPAI H5N1 and LPAI H9N2. The persistence of AIVs in LBMs is of great concern to public health, and this study highlights the importance of regularly reviewing and implementing infection control procedures as a means of reducing the exposure of the general public to AIVs.Emerging Microbes & Infections (2017) 6, e12; doi:10.1038/emi.2016.142; published online 8 March 2017.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Water Microbiology

Keywords
Journal Title emerging microbes & infections
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28270655
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170308
DCOM- 20170313
LR  - 20170313
IS  - 2222-1751 (Electronic)
IS  - 2222-1751 (Linking)
VI  - 6
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Mar 08
TI  - Insight into live bird markets of Bangladesh: an overview of the dynamics of
      transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.
PG  - e12
LID - 10.1038/emi.2016.142 [doi]
AB  - Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and low pathogenic avian influenza 
      (LPAI) H9N2 viruses have been recognized as threats to public health in
      Bangladesh since 2007. Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been implicated in 
      the transmission, dissemination, and circulation of these viruses, an in-depth
      analysis of the dynamics of avian transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses at the
      human-animal interface has been lacking. Here we present and evaluate
      epidemiological findings from active surveillance conducted among poultry in
      various production sectors in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2016. Overall, the
      prevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in collected samples was 24%. Our
      data show that AIVs are more prevalent in domestic birds within LBMs (30.4%) than
      in farms (9.6%). Quail, chickens and ducks showed a high prevalence of AIVs
      (>20%). The vast majority of AIVs detected (99.7%) have come from apparently
      healthy birds and poultry drinking water served as a reservoir of AIVs with a
      prevalence of 32.5% in collected samples. HPAI H5N1 was more frequently detected 
      in ducks while H9N2 was more common in chickens and quail. LBMs, particularly
      wholesale markets, have become a potential reservoir for various types of AIVs,
      including HPAI H5N1 and LPAI H9N2. The persistence of AIVs in LBMs is of great
      concern to public health, and this study highlights the importance of regularly
      reviewing and implementing infection control procedures as a means of reducing
      the exposure of the general public to AIVs.Emerging Microbes & Infections (2017) 
      6, e12; doi:10.1038/emi.2016.142; published online 8 March 2017.
FAU - Turner, Jasmine C M
AU  - Turner JC
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Feeroz, Mohammed M
AU  - Feeroz MM
AD  - Department of Zoology, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka 1342, Bangladesh.
FAU - Hasan, M Kamrul
AU  - Hasan MK
AD  - Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
FAU - Akhtar, Sharmin
AU  - Akhtar S
AD  - Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
FAU - Walker, David
AU  - Walker D
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Seiler, Patrick
AU  - Seiler P
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Barman, Subrata
AU  - Barman S
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Franks, John
AU  - Franks J
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Jones-Engel, Lisa
AU  - Jones-Engel L
AD  - Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
FAU - McKenzie, Pamela
AU  - McKenzie P
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Krauss, Scott
AU  - Krauss S
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Webby, Richard J
AU  - Webby RJ
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
FAU - Kayali, Ghazi
AU  - Kayali G
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences,
      University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, TX 77459, USA.
AD  - Human Link, Hazmieh, Baabda 1107-2090, Lebanon.
FAU - Webster, Robert G
AU  - Webster RG
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
      TN 38105, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170308
PL  - United States
TA  - Emerg Microbes Infect
JT  - Emerging microbes & infections
JID - 101594885
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Bangladesh
MH  - Chickens
MH  - Ducks
MH  - Epidemiological Monitoring
MH  - Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/*isolation & purification
MH  - Influenza A Virus, H9N2 Subtype/*isolation & purification
MH  - Influenza in Birds/*epidemiology/transmission/*virology
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Quail
MH  - *Water Microbiology
EDAT- 2017/03/09 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/26 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/20 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/26 [accepted]
AID - emi2016142 [pii]
AID - 10.1038/emi.2016.142 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Mar 8;6(3):e12. doi: 10.1038/emi.2016.142.

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