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Increase in Human Infections with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus During the Fifth Epidemic - China, October 2016-February 2017.

Abstract During March 2013-February 24, 2017, annual epidemics of avian influenza A(H7N9) in China resulted in 1,258 avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infections in humans being reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China and other regional sources (1). During the first four epidemics, 88% of patients developed pneumonia, 68% were admitted to an intensive care unit, and 41% died (2). Candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) were developed, and vaccine was manufactured based on representative viruses detected after the emergence of A(H7N9) virus in humans in 2013. During the ongoing fifth epidemic (beginning October 1, 2016),* 460 human infections with A(H7N9) virus have been reported, including 453 in mainland China, six associated with travel to mainland China from Hong Kong (four cases), Macao (one) and Taiwan (one), and one in an asymptomatic poultry worker in Macao (1). Although the clinical characteristics and risk factors for human infections do not appear to have changed (2,3), the reported human infections during the fifth epidemic represent a significant increase compared with the first four epidemics, which resulted in 135 (first epidemic), 320 (second), 226 (third), and 119 (fourth epidemic) human infections (2). Most human infections continue to result in severe respiratory illness and have been associated with poultry exposure. Although some limited human-to-human spread continues to be identified, no sustained human-to-human A(H7N9) transmission has been observed (2,3).
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28278147
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170309
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Mar 10
TI  - Increase in Human Infections with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus During the Fifth 
      Epidemic - China, October 2016-February 2017.
PG  - 254-255
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6609e2 [doi]
AB  - During March 2013-February 24, 2017, annual epidemics of avian influenza A(H7N9) 
      in China resulted in 1,258 avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infections in humans
      being reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) by the National Health and 
      Family Planning Commission of China and other regional sources (1). During the
      first four epidemics, 88% of patients developed pneumonia, 68% were admitted to
      an intensive care unit, and 41% died (2). Candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) were
      developed, and vaccine was manufactured based on representative viruses detected 
      after the emergence of A(H7N9) virus in humans in 2013. During the ongoing fifth 
      epidemic (beginning October 1, 2016),* 460 human infections with A(H7N9) virus
      have been reported, including 453 in mainland China, six associated with travel
      to mainland China from Hong Kong (four cases), Macao (one) and Taiwan (one), and 
      one in an asymptomatic poultry worker in Macao (1). Although the clinical
      characteristics and risk factors for human infections do not appear to have
      changed (2,3), the reported human infections during the fifth epidemic represent 
      a significant increase compared with the first four epidemics, which resulted in 
      135 (first epidemic), 320 (second), 226 (third), and 119 (fourth epidemic) human 
      infections (2). Most human infections continue to result in severe respiratory
      illness and have been associated with poultry exposure. Although some limited
      human-to-human spread continues to be identified, no sustained human-to-human
      A(H7N9) transmission has been observed (2,3).
FAU - Iuliano, A Danielle
AU  - Iuliano AD
FAU - Jang, Yunho
AU  - Jang Y
FAU - Jones, Joyce
AU  - Jones J
FAU - Davis, C Todd
AU  - Davis CT
FAU - Wentworth, David E
AU  - Wentworth DE
FAU - Uyeki, Timothy M
AU  - Uyeki TM
FAU - Roguski, Katherine
AU  - Roguski K
FAU - Thompson, Mark G
AU  - Thompson MG
FAU - Gubareva, Larisa
AU  - Gubareva L
FAU - Fry, Alicia M
AU  - Fry AM
FAU - Burns, Erin
AU  - Burns E
FAU - Trock, Susan
AU  - Trock S
FAU - Zhou, Suizan
AU  - Zhou S
FAU - Katz, Jacqueline M
AU  - Katz JM
FAU - Jernigan, Daniel B
AU  - Jernigan DB
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170310
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Epidemics/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Humans
MH  - Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/*isolation & purification
MH  - Influenza in Birds/transmission
MH  - Influenza, Human/*epidemiology/transmission/*virology
MH  - Occupational Diseases
MH  - Poultry
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Travel
EDAT- 2017/03/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/10 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6609e2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Mar 10;66(9):254-255. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6609e2.

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