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Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant Indigenous women in the Northern Territory of Australia.

Abstract Pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are at particular risk of severe illness and high attack rates of influenza infection. In Australia, routine seasonal influenza vaccination is currently strongly recommended for all pregnant women and women planning pregnancy, and is provided free of charge for all pregnant women. We sought to determine vaccination coverage, describe the trends and characteristics associated with influenza vaccine uptake and determine the validity of self-reported influenza vaccination in a population of Indigenous pregnant women who were participants of a vaccine trial, prior to and during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Vaccine coverage over the study period was 16% (35/214), increasing from 2.2% (3/136) in the period preceding the pandemic (2006-2009) to 41% (32/78) in the intra-pandemic period (2009-2010). Self-report was not a reliable estimate of verified vaccination status in the pre-pandemic period (κ=0.38) but was reliable in the intra-pandemic period (κ=0.91). None of the socio-demographic characteristics that we examined were associated with vaccine uptake. Whilst the increase in maternal influenza coverage rates are encouraging and indicate a willingness of pregnant Indigenous women to be vaccinated, the majority of women remained unvaccinated. Activities to improve influenza vaccination coverage for Indigenous pregnant women and monitor vaccine uptake remain a priority. Commun Dis Intell 2016;40(3):E340-E346.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title communicable diseases intelligence quarterly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28278407
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170309
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 1447-4514 (Print)
IS  - 1447-4514 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 3
DP  - 2016 Sep 30
TI  - Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant Indigenous women in the Northern
      Territory of Australia.
PG  - E340-E346
AB  - Pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are at particular risk of
      severe illness and high attack rates of influenza infection. In Australia,
      routine seasonal influenza vaccination is currently strongly recommended for all 
      pregnant women and women planning pregnancy, and is provided free of charge for
      all pregnant women. We sought to determine vaccination coverage, describe the
      trends and characteristics associated with influenza vaccine uptake and determine
      the validity of self-reported influenza vaccination in a population of Indigenous
      pregnant women who were participants of a vaccine trial, prior to and during the 
      2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Vaccine coverage over the study period was 16%
      (35/214), increasing from 2.2% (3/136) in the period preceding the pandemic
      (2006-2009) to 41% (32/78) in the intra-pandemic period (2009-2010). Self-report 
      was not a reliable estimate of verified vaccination status in the pre-pandemic
      period (kappa=0.38) but was reliable in the intra-pandemic period (kappa=0.91).
      None of the socio-demographic characteristics that we examined were associated
      with vaccine uptake. Whilst the increase in maternal influenza coverage rates are
      encouraging and indicate a willingness of pregnant Indigenous women to be
      vaccinated, the majority of women remained unvaccinated. Activities to improve
      influenza vaccination coverage for Indigenous pregnant women and monitor vaccine 
      uptake remain a priority. Commun Dis Intell 2016;40(3):E340-E346.
FAU - Moberley, Sarah A
AU  - Moberley SA
AD  - Post-doctoral Fellow, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin
      University, Northern Territory.
FAU - Lawrence, Jolie
AU  - Lawrence J
AD  - Medical Student, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University
      of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria.
FAU - Johnston, Vanessa
AU  - Johnston V
AD  - Post-doctoral Fellow, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin
      University, Northern Territory.
FAU - Andrews, Ross M
AU  - Andrews RM
AD  - Deputy Director, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University,
      Northern Territory.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160930
PL  - Australia
TA  - Commun Dis Intell Q Rep
JT  - Communicable diseases intelligence quarterly report
JID - 101601804
RN  - 0 (Influenza Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunization Programs/*organization & administration
MH  - Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology
MH  - Influenza Vaccines/*administration & dosage
MH  - Influenza, Human/*ethnology/immunology/*prevention & control/virology
MH  - Northern Territory/epidemiology
MH  - Oceanic Ancestry Group
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Self Report
MH  - Vaccination/psychology/*statistics & numerical data
EDAT- 2017/03/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/10 06:00
PST - epublish
SO  - Commun Dis Intell Q Rep. 2016 Sep 30;40(3):E340-E346.

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