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Response of cattle with clinical osteochondrosis to mineral supplementation.

Abstract Since 1982, farmers in the North West province and other parts of South Africa have noticed an increase in the incidence of lameness in cattle. Macro- and microscopical lesions of joints resembled osteochondrosis. Pre-trial data indicated that cattle with osteochondrotic lesions recovered almost completely when fed a supplement containing bio-available micro- and macrominerals of high quality. In the present trial, 43 clinically affected cattle of varying ages (1-5 years) and sexes were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was fed the same commercial supplement base with differing micro- and macromineral concentrations to determine the effect of mineral concentrations on the recovery from osteochondrosis. Both supplements 1 and 2 contained 25% of the recommended National Research Council (NRC) mineral values. Additional phosphate was added to supplement 2. Supplement 3, containing 80% of the NRC mineral values, was used as the control. Results from all three groups indicated no recovery from osteochondrosis. Urine pH of a small sample of the test cattle showed aciduria (pH < 6). Supplement analysis revealed addition of ammonium sulphate that contributed sulphate and nitrogen to the supplement. Supplementary dietary cation anion difference (DCAD) values were negative at -411 mEq/kg, -466 mEq/kg and -467 mEq/kg for supplements 1, 2 and 3, respectively, whereas the pre-trial supplement was calculated at +19.87 mEq/kg. It was hypothesised that feeding a low (negative) DCAD diet will predispose growing cattle to the development of osteochondrosis or exacerbate subclinical or clinical osteochondrosis in cattle.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Dietary Supplements

Keywords
Journal Title the onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28281772
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170310
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 2219-0635 (Electronic)
IS  - 0030-2465 (Linking)
VI  - 84
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 24
TI  - Response of cattle with clinical osteochondrosis to mineral supplementation.
PG  - e1-e6
LID - 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1365 [doi]
AB  - Since 1982, farmers in the North West province and other parts of South Africa
      have noticed an increase in the incidence of lameness in cattle. Macro- and
      microscopical lesions of joints resembled osteochondrosis. Pre-trial data
      indicated that cattle with osteochondrotic lesions recovered almost completely
      when fed a supplement containing bio-available micro- and macrominerals of high
      quality. In the present trial, 43 clinically affected cattle of varying ages (1-5
      years) and sexes were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was fed the 
      same commercial supplement base with differing micro- and macromineral
      concentrations to determine the effect of mineral concentrations on the recovery 
      from osteochondrosis. Both supplements 1 and 2 contained 25% of the recommended
      National Research Council (NRC) mineral values. Additional phosphate was added to
      supplement 2. Supplement 3, containing 80% of the NRC mineral values, was used as
      the control. Results from all three groups indicated no recovery from
      osteochondrosis. Urine pH of a small sample of the test cattle showed aciduria
      (pH < 6). Supplement analysis revealed addition of ammonium sulphate that
      contributed sulphate and nitrogen to the supplement. Supplementary dietary cation
      anion difference (DCAD) values were negative at -411 mEq/kg, -466 mEq/kg and -467
      mEq/kg for supplements 1, 2 and 3, respectively, whereas the pre-trial supplement
      was calculated at +19.87 mEq/kg. It was hypothesised that feeding a low
      (negative) DCAD diet will predispose growing cattle to the development of
      osteochondrosis or exacerbate subclinical or clinical osteochondrosis in cattle.
FAU - Van der Veen, Gerjan
AU  - Van der Veen G
AD  - Department of Paraclinical Sciences, University of Pretoria.
      [email protected]
FAU - Fosgate, Geoffrey T
AU  - Fosgate GT
FAU - Botha, Frederick K
AU  - Botha FK
FAU - Meissner, Heinz H
AU  - Meissner HH
FAU - Jacobs, Lubbe
AU  - Jacobs L
FAU - Prozesky, Leon
AU  - Prozesky L
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Randomized Controlled Trial
DEP - 20170224
PL  - South Africa
TA  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res
JT  - The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
JID - 0401107
RN  - 0 (Minerals)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animal Feed/analysis
MH  - Animal Husbandry
MH  - Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
MH  - Animals
MH  - Cattle
MH  - Cattle Diseases/*diet therapy/urine
MH  - *Dietary Supplements
MH  - Female
MH  - Lameness, Animal/etiology
MH  - Male
MH  - Minerals/*administration & dosage
MH  - Osteochondrosis/complications/diet therapy/*veterinary
MH  - Treatment Outcome
EDAT- 2017/03/11 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/28 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/25 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/21 [revised]
AID - 1365 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res. 2017 Feb 24;84(1):e1-e6. doi: 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1365.

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