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Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. L. Ixodid ticks infesting horses and donkeys.

Abstract The aim of the study was to determine the species spectrum of ixodid ticks that infest horses and donkeys in South Africa and to identify those species that act as vectors of disease to domestic livestock. Ticks were collected opportunistically from 391 horses countrywide by their owners or grooms, or by veterinary students and staff at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria. Ticks were also collected from 76 donkeys in Limpopo Province, 2 in Gauteng Province and 1 in North West province. All the ticks were identified by means of a stereoscopic microscope. Horses were infested with 17 tick species, 72.1% with Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi, 19.4% with Amblyomma hebraeum and 15.6% with Rhipicephalus decoloratus. Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi was recovered from horses in all nine provinces of South Africa and R. decoloratus in eight provinces. Donkeys were infested with eight tick species, and 81.6% were infested with R. evertsi evertsi, 23.7% with A. hebraeum and 10.5% with R. decoloratus. Several tick species collected from the horses and donkeys are the vectors of economically important diseases of livestock. Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi is the vector of Theileria equi, the causative organism of equine piroplasmosis. It also transmits Anaplasma marginale, the causative organism of anaplasmosis in cattle. Amblyomma hebraeum is the vector of Ehrlichia ruminantium, the causative organism of heartwater in cattle, sheep and goats, whereas R. decoloratus transmits Babesia bigemina, the causative organism of babesiosis in cattle.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Arachnid Vectors

Ixodidae

Keywords
Journal Title the onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28281774
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170310
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 2219-0635 (Electronic)
IS  - 0030-2465 (Linking)
VI  - 84
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 28
TI  - Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. L. Ixodid ticks infesting
      horses and donkeys.
PG  - e1-e6
LID - 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1302 [doi]
AB  - The aim of the study was to determine the species spectrum of ixodid ticks that
      infest horses and donkeys in South Africa and to identify those species that act 
      as vectors of disease to domestic livestock. Ticks were collected
      opportunistically from 391 horses countrywide by their owners or grooms, or by
      veterinary students and staff at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of
      Pretoria. Ticks were also collected from 76 donkeys in Limpopo Province, 2 in
      Gauteng Province and 1 in North West province. All the ticks were identified by
      means of a stereoscopic microscope. Horses were infested with 17 tick species,
      72.1% with Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi, 19.4% with Amblyomma hebraeum and 15.6%
      with Rhipicephalus decoloratus. Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi was recovered from 
      horses in all nine provinces of South Africa and R. decoloratus in eight
      provinces. Donkeys were infested with eight tick species, and 81.6% were infested
      with R. evertsi evertsi, 23.7% with A. hebraeum and 10.5% with R. decoloratus.
      Several tick species collected from the horses and donkeys are the vectors of
      economically important diseases of livestock. Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi is
      the vector of Theileria equi, the causative organism of equine piroplasmosis. It 
      also transmits Anaplasma marginale, the causative organism of anaplasmosis in
      cattle. Amblyomma hebraeum is the vector of Ehrlichia ruminantium, the causative 
      organism of heartwater in cattle, sheep and goats, whereas R. decoloratus
      transmits Babesia bigemina, the causative organism of babesiosis in cattle.
FAU - Horak, Ivan G
AU  - Horak IG
AD  - Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria.
      [email protected]
FAU - Heyne, Heloise
AU  - Heyne H
FAU - Halajian, Ali
AU  - Halajian A
FAU - Booysen, Shalaine
AU  - Booysen S
FAU - Smit, Willem J
AU  - Smit WJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170228
PL  - South Africa
TA  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res
JT  - The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
JID - 0401107
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Animals, Wild
MH  - *Arachnid Vectors
MH  - Equidae/*parasitology
MH  - Horse Diseases/*epidemiology/parasitology/transmission
MH  - Horses
MH  - *Ixodidae
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - South Africa/epidemiology
MH  - Tick Infestations/epidemiology/parasitology/*veterinary
MH  - Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology/parasitology/*veterinary
EDAT- 2017/03/11 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/22 [received]
PHST- 2016/08/23 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/22 [revised]
AID - 1302 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res. 2017 Feb 28;84(1):e1-e6. doi: 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1302.

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