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Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. LI. Ticks infesting leopard tortoises <i>Stigmochelys pardalis</i>, hingeback tortoises <i>Kinixys zombensis</i> and angulate tortoises <i>Chersina angulata</i>.

Abstract The objective of the study was to record the tick species collected from three species of tortoise, each in a different province of South Africa. Ticks were collected from leopard tortoises, Stigmochyles pardalis, in the southern region of the Kruger National Park, Mpumalanga province; from hingeback tortoises, Kinixys zombensis, in the Enseleni Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal province and from angulate tortoises, Chersina angulata, in the West Coast National Park, Western Cape province. Of the 63 leopard tortoises examined, 58 were infested with Amblyomma marmoreum and 49 with Amblyomma hebraeum, and all stages of development of both species were recovered. Amblyomma nuttalli was collected from 25 hingeback tortoises, and all stages of development were present. All 24 angulate tortoises examined were infested with Amblyomma sylvaticum, and large numbers of larvae, nymphs and adults were collected. Three snake species and a sand lizard were also infested with A. sylvaticum. The adults of A. marmoreum, A. nuttalli and A. sylvaticum were identified as specific parasites of the family Testudinidae, whereas all stages of development of A. hebraeum were classified as generalists.
PMID
Related Publications

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Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLVII. Ticks of tortoises and other reptiles.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28281776
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170310
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 2219-0635 (Electronic)
IS  - 0030-2465 (Linking)
VI  - 84
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 28
TI  - Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. LI. Ticks infesting
      leopard tortoises &lt;i&gt;Stigmochelys pardalis&lt;/i&gt;, hingeback tortoises &lt;i&gt;Kinixys
      zombensis&lt;/i&gt; and angulate tortoises &lt;i&gt;Chersina angulata&lt;/i&gt;.
PG  - e1-e5
LID - 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1303 [doi]
AB  - The objective of the study was to record the tick species collected from three
      species of tortoise, each in a different province of South Africa. Ticks were
      collected from leopard tortoises, Stigmochyles pardalis, in the southern region
      of the Kruger National Park, Mpumalanga province; from hingeback tortoises,
      Kinixys zombensis, in the Enseleni Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal province and
      from angulate tortoises, Chersina angulata, in the West Coast National Park,
      Western Cape province. Of the 63 leopard tortoises examined, 58 were infested
      with Amblyomma marmoreum and 49 with Amblyomma hebraeum, and all stages of
      development of both species were recovered. Amblyomma nuttalli was collected from
      25 hingeback tortoises, and all stages of development were present. All 24
      angulate tortoises examined were infested with Amblyomma sylvaticum, and large
      numbers of larvae, nymphs and adults were collected. Three snake species and a
      sand lizard were also infested with A. sylvaticum. The adults of A. marmoreum, A.
      nuttalli and A. sylvaticum were identified as specific parasites of the family
      Testudinidae, whereas all stages of development of A. hebraeum were classified as
      generalists.
FAU - Horak, Ivan G
AU  - Horak IG
AD  - Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria.
      [email protected]
FAU - Pearcy, Ashley
AU  - Pearcy A
FAU - Lloyd, Kyle J
AU  - Lloyd KJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170228
PL  - South Africa
TA  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res
JT  - The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
JID - 0401107
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - South Africa/epidemiology
MH  - Tick Infestations/epidemiology/parasitology/*veterinary
MH  - Ticks/*classification
MH  - Turtles/classification/*parasitology
EDAT- 2017/03/11 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/22 [received]
PHST- 2016/08/30 [accepted]
AID - 1303 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Onderstepoort J Vet Res. 2017 Feb 28;84(1):e1-e5. doi: 10.4102/ojvr.v84i1.1303.

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