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Rheumatic fever with severe carditis: still prevalent in the South West Pacific.

Abstract Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has a worldwide prevalence of 33 million cases and 270 000 deaths annually, making it the most common acquired heart disease in the world. There is a disparate global burden in developing countries. This case report aims to address the minimal RHD coverage by the international medical community. A Tahitian boy aged 10 years was diagnosed with advanced heart failure secondary to RHD at a local clinic. Previous, subtle symptoms of changes in handwriting and months of fever had gone unrecognised. Following a rapid referral to the nearest tertiary centre in New Zealand, urgent cardiac surgery took place. He returned home facing lifelong anticoagulation. This case highlights the RHD burden in Oceania, the limited access to paediatric cardiac services in countries where the RHD burden is greatest and the need for improved awareness of RHD by healthcare professionals, and the general public, in endemic areas.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title bmj case reports
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28283470
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170311
DCOM- 20170316
LR  - 20170316
IS  - 1757-790X (Electronic)
IS  - 1757-790X (Linking)
VI  - 2017
DP  - 2017 Mar 10
TI  - Rheumatic fever with severe carditis: still prevalent in the South West Pacific.
LID - bcr2016218954 [pii]
LID - 10.1136/bcr-2016-218954 [doi]
AB  - Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has a worldwide prevalence of 33 million cases and 
      270 000 deaths annually, making it the most common acquired heart disease in the 
      world. There is a disparate global burden in developing countries. This case
      report aims to address the minimal RHD coverage by the international medical
      community. A Tahitian boy aged 10 years was diagnosed with advanced heart failure
      secondary to RHD at a local clinic. Previous, subtle symptoms of changes in
      handwriting and months of fever had gone unrecognised. Following a rapid referral
      to the nearest tertiary centre in New Zealand, urgent cardiac surgery took place.
      He returned home facing lifelong anticoagulation. This case highlights the RHD
      burden in Oceania, the limited access to paediatric cardiac services in countries
      where the RHD burden is greatest and the need for improved awareness of RHD by
      healthcare professionals, and the general public, in endemic areas.
CI  - 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
FAU - Nandra, Taran Kaur
AU  - Nandra TK
AD  - Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.
FAU - Wilson, Nigel J
AU  - Wilson NJ
AD  - Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
FAU - Artrip, John
AU  - Artrip J
AD  - Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
FAU - Pagis, Bruno
AU  - Pagis B
AD  - Centre Hospitalier de la Polynesie Francaise, Papeete, French Polynesia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170310
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ Case Rep
JT  - BMJ case reports
JID - 101526291
SB  - IM
MH  - Child
MH  - Developing Countries
MH  - Heart Failure/*etiology/surgery
MH  - Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/*instrumentation
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Mitral Valve Annuloplasty/methods
MH  - Myocarditis/complications/*diagnosis/surgery
MH  - Oceanic Ancestry Group
MH  - Rheumatic Fever/complications/*diagnosis/surgery
MH  - Treatment Outcome
EDAT- 2017/03/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/12 06:00
AID - bcr-2016-218954 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/bcr-2016-218954 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ Case Rep. 2017 Mar 10;2017. pii: bcr2016218954. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2016-218954.

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