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Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity.

Abstract Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Fingers

Median Nerve

Muscle Strength

Posture

Wrist

Keywords
Journal Title biomed research international
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28286771
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170313
DCOM- 20170317
LR  - 20170317
IS  - 2314-6141 (Electronic)
VI  - 2017
DP  - 2017
TI  - Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity.
PG  - 7156489
LID - 10.1155/2017/7156489 [doi]
AB  - Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using
      high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and
      fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants
      and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median
      nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms
      of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with
      and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture 
      and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow
      velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly 
      lower than flexed 30 degrees (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15 degrees (3.27 cm/s), and
      extended 30 degrees (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was 
      lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant
      difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated 
      with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force.
      This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure 
      of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and
      advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral
      nerve compression.
FAU - Wilson, Katherine E
AU  - Wilson KE
AD  - Occupational Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster
      University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1.
FAU - Tat, Jimmy
AU  - Tat J
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Keir, Peter J
AU  - Keir PJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9811-1547
AD  - Occupational Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster
      University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1.
LA  - eng
PT  - Clinical Trial
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170213
PL  - United States
TA  - Biomed Res Int
JT  - BioMed research international
JID - 101600173
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Blood Flow Velocity
MH  - Carpal Tunnel Syndrome/*physiopathology
MH  - Female
MH  - *Fingers/blood supply/physiopathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Median Nerve/blood supply/physiopathology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Muscle Strength
MH  - *Posture
MH  - *Wrist/blood supply/physiopathology
PMC - PMC5327754
COI - The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the
      publication of this paper.
EDAT- 2017/03/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/14 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/19 [revised]
PHST- 2017/01/11 [accepted]
AID - 10.1155/2017/7156489 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:7156489. doi: 10.1155/2017/7156489. Epub 2017 Feb 13.

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