PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Mercury Spill Responses - Five States, 2012-2015.

Abstract Despite measures to educate the public about the dangers of elemental mercury, spills continue to occur in homes, schools, health care facilities, and other settings, endangering the public's health and requiring costly cleanup. Mercury is most efficiently absorbed by the lungs, and exposure to high levels of mercury vapor after a release can cause cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and visual disturbances (1). Children and fetuses are most susceptible to the adverse effects of mercury vapor exposure. Because their organ systems are still developing, children have increased respiratory rates, and they are closer to the ground where mercury vapors are most highly concentrated (2). To summarize key features of recent mercury spills and lessons learned, five state health departments involved in the cleanup (Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, and Wisconsin) compiled data from various sources on nonthermometer mercury spills from 2012 to 2015. The most common sites of contamination were residences, schools and school buses, health care facilities, and commercial and industrial facilities. Children aged <18 years were present in about one third of the spills, with approximately one in seven incidents resulting in symptoms consistent with acute mercury exposure. To protect the public's health after a mercury spill, it is important that local, state, and federal agencies communicate and coordinate effectively to ensure a quick response, and to minimize the spread of contamination. To reduce the number of mercury spills that occur in the United States, public health officials should increase awareness about exchange programs for mercury-containing items and educate school and health care workers about sources of mercury and how to dispose of them properly.
PMID
Related Publications

Notes from the field: elemental mercury spill in school bus and residence - North Carolina, 2013.

Public health response to metallic mercury spills in Kansas.

Elemental mercury poisoning in occupational and residential settings.

Measuring exposure to an elemental mercury spill--Dakota County, Minnesota, 2004.

Elemental mercury spills.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Chemical Hazard Release

Mercury

Public Health Practice

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28301447
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170316
DCOM- 20170322
LR  - 20170322
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Mar 17
TI  - Mercury Spill Responses - Five States, 2012-2015.
PG  - 274-277
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6610a3 [doi]
AB  - Despite measures to educate the public about the dangers of elemental mercury,
      spills continue to occur in homes, schools, health care facilities, and other
      settings, endangering the public's health and requiring costly cleanup. Mercury
      is most efficiently absorbed by the lungs, and exposure to high levels of mercury
      vapor after a release can cause cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, nausea, 
      vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and visual disturbances (1). Children and fetuses 
      are most susceptible to the adverse effects of mercury vapor exposure. Because
      their organ systems are still developing, children have increased respiratory
      rates, and they are closer to the ground where mercury vapors are most highly
      concentrated (2). To summarize key features of recent mercury spills and lessons 
      learned, five state health departments involved in the cleanup (Iowa, Michigan,
      Missouri, North Carolina, and Wisconsin) compiled data from various sources on
      nonthermometer mercury spills from 2012 to 2015. The most common sites of
      contamination were residences, schools and school buses, health care facilities, 
      and commercial and industrial facilities. Children aged &lt;18 years were present in
      about one third of the spills, with approximately one in seven incidents
      resulting in symptoms consistent with acute mercury exposure. To protect the
      public's health after a mercury spill, it is important that local, state, and
      federal agencies communicate and coordinate effectively to ensure a quick
      response, and to minimize the spread of contamination. To reduce the number of
      mercury spills that occur in the United States, public health officials should
      increase awareness about exchange programs for mercury-containing items and
      educate school and health care workers about sources of mercury and how to
      dispose of them properly.
FAU - Wozniak, Ryan J
AU  - Wozniak RJ
FAU - Hirsch, Anne E
AU  - Hirsch AE
FAU - Bush, Christina R
AU  - Bush CR
FAU - Schmitz, Stuart
AU  - Schmitz S
FAU - Wenzel, Jeff
AU  - Wenzel J
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170317
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
RN  - FXS1BY2PGL (Mercury)
SB  - IM
MH  - *Chemical Hazard Release
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Mercury
MH  - Mercury Poisoning/*prevention &amp; control
MH  - *Public Health Practice
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2017/03/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/17 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6610a3 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Mar 17;66(10):274-277. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6610a3.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
</b:Sources>