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Oral microbiome in HIV-associated periodontitis.

Abstract HIV-associated periodontal diseases (PD) could serve as a source of chronic inflammation. Here, we sought to characterize the oral microbial signatures of HIV+ and HIV- individuals at different levels of PD severity.This cross-sectional study included both HIV+ and HIV- patients with varying degrees of PD. Two tooth, 2 cheek, and 1 saliva samples were obtained for microbiome analysis. Mothur/SILVADB were used to classify sequences. R/Bioconductor (Vegan, PhyloSeq, and DESeq2) was employed to assess overall microbiome structure differences and differential abundance of bacterial genera between groups. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to assess immune activation in CD4 and CD8 cell populations.Around 250 cheek, tooth, and saliva samples from 50 participants (40 HIV+ and 10 HIV-) were included. Severity of PD was classified clinically as None/Mild (N), Moderate (M), and Severe (S) with 18 (36%), 16 (32%), and 16 (32%) participants in each category, respectively. Globally, ordination analysis demonstrated clustering by anatomic site (R2 = 0.25, P < 0.001). HIV status and PD severity showed a statistically significant impact on microbiome composition but only accounted for a combined 2% of variation. HIV+ samples were enriched in genera Abiotrophia, Neisseria, Kingella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae and depleted in Leptotrichia and Selenomonas. The Neisseria genus was consistently enriched in HIV+ participants regardless of sampling site and PD level. Immune markers were altered in HIV+ participants but did not show association with the oral microbiome.HIV-associated changes in oral microbiome result in subtle microbial signatures along different stages of PD that are common in independent oral anatomic sites.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Microbiota

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28328799
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170322
DCOM- 20170410
LR  - 20170410
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Mar
TI  - Oral microbiome in HIV-associated periodontitis.
PG  - e5821
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000005821 [doi]
AB  - HIV-associated periodontal diseases (PD) could serve as a source of chronic
      inflammation. Here, we sought to characterize the oral microbial signatures of
      HIV+ and HIV- individuals at different levels of PD severity.This cross-sectional
      study included both HIV+ and HIV- patients with varying degrees of PD. Two tooth,
      2 cheek, and 1 saliva samples were obtained for microbiome analysis.
      Mothur/SILVADB were used to classify sequences. R/Bioconductor (Vegan, PhyloSeq, 
      and DESeq2) was employed to assess overall microbiome structure differences and
      differential abundance of bacterial genera between groups. Polychromatic flow
      cytometry was used to assess immune activation in CD4 and CD8 cell
      populations.Around 250 cheek, tooth, and saliva samples from 50 participants (40 
      HIV+ and 10 HIV-) were included. Severity of PD was classified clinically as
      None/Mild (N), Moderate (M), and Severe (S) with 18 (36%), 16 (32%), and 16 (32%)
      participants in each category, respectively. Globally, ordination analysis
      demonstrated clustering by anatomic site (R2 = 0.25, P &lt; 0.001). HIV status and
      PD severity showed a statistically significant impact on microbiome composition
      but only accounted for a combined 2% of variation. HIV+ samples were enriched in 
      genera Abiotrophia, Neisseria, Kingella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae and
      depleted in Leptotrichia and Selenomonas. The Neisseria genus was consistently
      enriched in HIV+ participants regardless of sampling site and PD level. Immune
      markers were altered in HIV+ participants but did not show association with the
      oral microbiome.HIV-associated changes in oral microbiome result in subtle
      microbial signatures along different stages of PD that are common in independent 
      oral anatomic sites.
FAU - Noguera-Julian, Marc
AU  - Noguera-Julian M
AD  - aIrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, Badalona bUniversity Autonoma de Barcelona,
      Bellaterra cUniversity de Vic-University Central de Catalunya, Vic, Catalonia,
      Spain dDivision of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine
      eInfectious Diseases Program, Grady Health System fDepartment of Biology, Emory
      University, O. Wayne Rollins Research Center gDepartment of Global Health, Emory 
      University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA hMinistry of Health,
      Zambia iUnitat VIH, Hosp. University Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Catalonia, 
      Spain.
FAU - Guillen, Yolanda
AU  - Guillen Y
FAU - Peterson, Jessica
AU  - Peterson J
FAU - Reznik, David
AU  - Reznik D
FAU - Harris, Erica V
AU  - Harris EV
FAU - Joseph, Sandeep J
AU  - Joseph SJ
FAU - Rivera, Javier
AU  - Rivera J
FAU - Kannanganat, Sunil
AU  - Kannanganat S
FAU - Amara, Rama
AU  - Amara R
FAU - Nguyen, Minh Ly
AU  - Nguyen ML
FAU - Mutembo, Simon
AU  - Mutembo S
FAU - Paredes, Roger
AU  - Paredes R
FAU - Read, Timothy D
AU  - Read TD
FAU - Marconi, Vincent C
AU  - Marconi VC
LA  - eng
GR  - P30 AI050409/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
RN  - 0 (Anti-Retroviral Agents)
RN  - 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use
MH  - CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
MH  - CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes
MH  - Cheek/microbiology
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Flow Cytometry
MH  - HIV Infections/*complications/drug therapy/immunology/*microbiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Microbiota
MH  - Mouth/*microbiology
MH  - Periodontitis/*complications/immunology/*microbiology
MH  - RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
MH  - Saliva/microbiology
MH  - Severity of Illness Index
PMC - PMC5371436
EDAT- 2017/03/23 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/23 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000005821 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201703240-00002 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Mar;96(12):e5821. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000005821.

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