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Increase in the prevalence of arthritis in adulthood among adults exposed to Chinese famine of 1959 to 1961 during childhood: A cross-sectional survey.

Abstract The developmental origins hypothesis postulates that under-nutrition in the early stage of life is associated with an increased risk of disease in adulthood. This study aimed to examine the association of exposure to the Chinese famine of 1959 to 1961 in early life with the risk of arthritis in adulthood.From July to September 2009, the study adopted multistage stratified random sampling cross-sectional survey to recruit 1224 eligible adults in Chongqing. Famine exposure groups were categorized into 3 groups: (1) childhood exposure, (2) fetal exposure, and (3) nonexposure. Self-reported arthritis of physician diagnosis was obtained. A total of 1224 eligible respondents were interviewed, including 299 individuals exposed during childhood, 455 exposed when fetal, and 470 without exposure.The prevalence of arthritis in adulthood among individuals exposed to famine during childhood was significantly higher than those not exposed (17.39% vs 11.28%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.573 with a 95% confidence interval of [CI] [1.020, 2.424]). Persons exposed to famine during the fetal period did not significantly contribute to a higher rate of arthritis in adulthood than those who were not exposed to famine (13.19% vs 11.28%, OR = 1.072, 95% CI = 0.713, 1.613). In addition, education level, the average monthly income, sleep status, and satisfaction of the present living condition were associated with the risk of arthritis in adulthood.Exposure to the Chinese famine during childhood may be associated with an increased risk of arthritis in adulthood. This study suggests that early life nutrition may have an effect on the risk of arthritis in adulthood.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28353598
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170329
DCOM- 20170406
LR  - 20170406
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 13
DP  - 2017 Mar
TI  - Increase in the prevalence of arthritis in adulthood among adults exposed to
      Chinese famine of 1959 to 1961 during childhood: A cross-sectional survey.
PG  - e6496
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006496 [doi]
AB  - The developmental origins hypothesis postulates that under-nutrition in the early
      stage of life is associated with an increased risk of disease in adulthood. This 
      study aimed to examine the association of exposure to the Chinese famine of 1959 
      to 1961 in early life with the risk of arthritis in adulthood.From July to
      September 2009, the study adopted multistage stratified random sampling
      cross-sectional survey to recruit 1224 eligible adults in Chongqing. Famine
      exposure groups were categorized into 3 groups: (1) childhood exposure, (2) fetal
      exposure, and (3) nonexposure. Self-reported arthritis of physician diagnosis was
      obtained. A total of 1224 eligible respondents were interviewed, including 299
      individuals exposed during childhood, 455 exposed when fetal, and 470 without
      exposure.The prevalence of arthritis in adulthood among individuals exposed to
      famine during childhood was significantly higher than those not exposed (17.39%
      vs 11.28%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.573 with a 95% confidence interval of [CI] [1.020,
      2.424]). Persons exposed to famine during the fetal period did not significantly 
      contribute to a higher rate of arthritis in adulthood than those who were not
      exposed to famine (13.19% vs 11.28%, OR = 1.072, 95% CI = 0.713, 1.613). In
      addition, education level, the average monthly income, sleep status, and
      satisfaction of the present living condition were associated with the risk of
      arthritis in adulthood.Exposure to the Chinese famine during childhood may be
      associated with an increased risk of arthritis in adulthood. This study suggests 
      that early life nutrition may have an effect on the risk of arthritis in
      adulthood.
FAU - Xu, Xianglong
AU  - Xu X
AD  - aSchool of Public Health and Management bResearch Center for Medicine and Social 
      Development cThe Innovation Center for Social Risk Governance in Health dSchool
      of the Second Clinical, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China
      eDepartment of Preventive Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, CA.
FAU - Liu, Lingli
AU  - Liu L
FAU - Xie, Wenxi
AU  - Xie W
FAU - Zhang, Yong
AU  - Zhang Y
FAU - Zeng, Huan
AU  - Zeng H
FAU - Zhang, Fan
AU  - Zhang F
FAU - Reis, Cesar
AU  - Reis C
FAU - Cao, Xianqing
AU  - Cao X
FAU - Zhao, Yong
AU  - Zhao Y
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Arthritis/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
MH  - Starvation/complications/*epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/03/30 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/30 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006496 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201703310-00044 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Mar;96(13):e6496. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006496.

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