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A disease called stigma: the experience of stigma among African men with TB diagnosis in London.

Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) is a highly stigmatised disease. This paper sought to explore the experiences and meanings of stigma among African men with a previous TB diagnosis.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Social Stigma

Stereotyping

Keywords

Africans

London

Migrants

Stigma

Tuberculosis

Journal Title public health
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28359390
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170331
DCOM- 20170417
LR  - 20170417
IS  - 1476-5616 (Electronic)
IS  - 0033-3506 (Linking)
VI  - 145
DP  - 2017 Apr
TI  - A disease called stigma: the experience of stigma among African men with TB
      diagnosis in London.
PG  - 45-50
LID - S0033-3506(16)30438-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.12.017 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: Tuberculosis (TB) is a highly stigmatised disease. This paper sought 
      to explore the experiences and meanings of stigma among African men with a
      previous TB diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: Qualitative approach with ten men recruited 
      from a community based organisation offering health support to the men. METHODS: 
      In-depth semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Men were unable to recognise TB
      symptoms and subsequently made late clinical presentation when they were also
      diagnosed with HIV. A few were diagnosed when in immigration detention centres.
      The experience of late diagnosis informed their understanding of the word stigma.
      The link between HIV and TB compounded experiences of stigma which led to
      depression and compromised HIV confidentiality. CONCLUSION: TB late diagnosis
      among the men has implications for population health. Multidisciplinary teams
      supporting ongoing TB education programmes should include African men's
      organisations, due to the close supportive links such organisations have with
      African men.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier
      Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Chinouya, M J
AU  - Chinouya MJ
AD  - University of Liverpool, Department of Public Health & Policy, London Campus, 33 
      Finsbury Square, London EC2A 1AG, UK. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Adeyanju, O
AU  - Adeyanju O
AD  - University of Liverpool, Department of Public Health & Policy, London Campus, 33 
      Finsbury Square, London EC2A 1AG, UK. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170120
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Public Health
JT  - Public health
JID - 0376507
SB  - IM
MH  - AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/*psychology
MH  - Adult
MH  - African Continental Ancestry Group/*psychology
MH  - Delayed Diagnosis
MH  - Depression/etiology
MH  - Emigrants and Immigrants/*psychology
MH  - Female
MH  - HIV Infections/*psychology
MH  - Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Interviews as Topic
MH  - London
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Qualitative Research
MH  - Residence Characteristics
MH  - *Social Stigma
MH  - *Stereotyping
MH  - Time-to-Treatment
MH  - Tuberculosis/diagnosis/*ethnology/*psychology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Africans
OT  - London
OT  - Migrants
OT  - Stigma
OT  - Tuberculosis
EDAT- 2017/04/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/07 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/12 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/13 [accepted]
AID - S0033-3506(16)30438-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.12.017 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Public Health. 2017 Apr;145:45-50. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.12.017. Epub 2017 Jan
      20.

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