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Fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Abstract The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on breast cancer prognosis is controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis was carried out to explore their associations. A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest and Chinese databases from inception to April 2016. The summary hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI were estimated using a random effects model if substantial heterogeneity existed and using a fixed effects model if not. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed. In total, twelve studies comprising 41 185 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest with the lowest, the summary HR for all-cause mortality were 1·01 (95 % CI 0·72, 1·42) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0·96 (95 % CI 0·83, 1·12) for total vegetable intake, 0·99 (95 % CI 0·89, 1·11) for cruciferous vegetable intake and 0·88 (95 % CI 0·74, 1·05) for fruit intake; those for breast cancer-specific mortality were 1·05 (95 % CI 0·77, 1·43) for total vegetable intake and 0·94 (95 % CI 0·69, 1·26) for fruit intake; and those for breast cancer recurrence were 0·89 (95 % CI 0·53, 1·50) for total vegetable intake and 0·98 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·26) for cruciferous vegetable intake. This meta-analysis found no significant associations between fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer prognosis.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Diet

Fruit

Vegetables

Keywords

HR hazard ratio

Breast cancer

Fruits and vegetables

Meta-analyses

Mortality

Recurrence

Journal Title the british journal of nutrition
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28366183
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170403
DCOM- 20170420
LR  - 20170420
IS  - 1475-2662 (Electronic)
IS  - 0007-1145 (Linking)
VI  - 117
IP  - 5
DP  - 2017 Mar
TI  - Fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of
      prospective cohort studies.
PG  - 737-749
LID - 10.1017/S0007114517000423 [doi]
AB  - The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on breast cancer prognosis is
      controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis was carried out to explore their
      associations. A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science,
      OVID, ProQuest and Chinese databases from inception to April 2016. The summary
      hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI were estimated using a random effects model if
      substantial heterogeneity existed and using a fixed effects model if not.
      Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed. In total, twelve 
      studies comprising 41 185 participants were included in the meta-analysis.
      Comparing the highest with the lowest, the summary HR for all-cause mortality
      were 1.01 (95 % CI 0.72, 1.42) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0.96 (95 % CI 
      0.83, 1.12) for total vegetable intake, 0.99 (95 % CI 0.89, 1.11) for cruciferous
      vegetable intake and 0.88 (95 % CI 0.74, 1.05) for fruit intake; those for breast
      cancer-specific mortality were 1.05 (95 % CI 0.77, 1.43) for total vegetable
      intake and 0.94 (95 % CI 0.69, 1.26) for fruit intake; and those for breast
      cancer recurrence were 0.89 (95 % CI 0.53, 1.50) for total vegetable intake and
      0.98 (95 % CI 0.76, 1.26) for cruciferous vegetable intake. This meta-analysis
      found no significant associations between fruit and vegetable intake and breast
      cancer prognosis.
FAU - Peng, Chen
AU  - Peng C
AD  - 1Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology,School of Public Health,Sun
      Yat-Sen University,Guangzhou 510080,People's Republic of China.
FAU - Luo, Wei-Ping
AU  - Luo WP
AD  - 1Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology,School of Public Health,Sun
      Yat-Sen University,Guangzhou 510080,People's Republic of China.
FAU - Zhang, Cai-Xia
AU  - Zhang CX
AD  - 1Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology,School of Public Health,Sun
      Yat-Sen University,Guangzhou 510080,People's Republic of China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Meta-Analysis
DEP - 20170403
PL  - England
TA  - Br J Nutr
JT  - The British journal of nutrition
JID - 0372547
SB  - IM
MH  - Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/mortality
MH  - China
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - *Diet
MH  - Female
MH  - *Fruit
MH  - Humans
MH  - Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology
MH  - Prognosis
MH  - Prospective Studies
MH  - *Vegetables
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - * HR hazard ratio
OT  - *Breast cancer
OT  - *Fruits and vegetables
OT  - *Meta-analyses
OT  - *Mortality
OT  - *Recurrence
EDAT- 2017/04/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/04 06:00
AID - S0007114517000423 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S0007114517000423 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(5):737-749. doi: 10.1017/S0007114517000423. Epub 2017 Apr
      3.

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