PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Are media reports able to cause somatic symptoms attributed to WiFi radiation? An experimental test of the negative expectation hypothesis.

Abstract People suffering from idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) experience numerous non-specific symptoms that they attribute to EMF. The cause of this condition remains vague and evidence shows that psychological rather than bioelectromagnetic mechanisms are at work. We hypothesized a role of media reports in the etiology of IEI-EMF and investigated how somatosensory perception is affected. 65 healthy participants were instructed that EMF exposure can lead to enhanced somatosensory perception. Participants were randomly assigned to watch either a television report on adverse health effects of EMF or a neutral report. During the following experiment, participants rated stimulus intensities of tactile (electric) stimuli while being exposed to a sham WiFi signal in 50% of the trials. Sham WiFi exposure led to increased intensity ratings of tactile stimuli in the WiFi film group, especially in participants with higher levels of somatosensory amplification. Participants of the WiFi group reported more anxiety concerning WiFi exposure than the Control group and tended to perceive themselves as being more sensitive to EMF after the experiment compared to before. Sensational media reports can facilitate enhanced perception of tactile stimuli in healthy participants. People tending to perceive bodily symptoms as intense, disturbing, and noxious seem most vulnerable. Receiving sensational media reports might sensitize people to develop a nocebo effect and thereby contribute to the development of IEI-EMF. By promoting catastrophizing thoughts and increasing symptom-focused attention, perception might more readily be enhanced and misattributed to EMF.
PMID
Related Publications

Idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) and electrosensibility (ES) - are they connected?

Polluted places or polluted minds? An experimental sham-exposure study on background psychological factors of symptom formation in 'Idiophatic Environmental Intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields'.

Is There a Connection Between Electrosensitivity and Electrosensibility? A Replication Study.

Dispositional aspects of body focus and idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF).

Are media warnings about the adverse health effects of modern life self-fulfilling? An experimental study on idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF).

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Touch

Wireless Technology

Keywords

Expectation

Idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF)

Media

Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS)

Nocebo effect

Journal Title environmental research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28371755
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170403
DCOM- 20170623
LR  - 20170623
IS  - 1096-0953 (Electronic)
IS  - 0013-9351 (Linking)
VI  - 156
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - Are media reports able to cause somatic symptoms attributed to WiFi radiation? An
      experimental test of the negative expectation hypothesis.
PG  - 265-271
LID - S0013-9351(17)30080-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.envres.2017.03.040 [doi]
AB  - People suffering from idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to
      electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) experience numerous non-specific symptoms that
      they attribute to EMF. The cause of this condition remains vague and evidence
      shows that psychological rather than bioelectromagnetic mechanisms are at work.
      We hypothesized a role of media reports in the etiology of IEI-EMF and
      investigated how somatosensory perception is affected. 65 healthy participants
      were instructed that EMF exposure can lead to enhanced somatosensory perception. 
      Participants were randomly assigned to watch either a television report on
      adverse health effects of EMF or a neutral report. During the following
      experiment, participants rated stimulus intensities of tactile (electric) stimuli
      while being exposed to a sham WiFi signal in 50% of the trials. Sham WiFi
      exposure led to increased intensity ratings of tactile stimuli in the WiFi film
      group, especially in participants with higher levels of somatosensory
      amplification. Participants of the WiFi group reported more anxiety concerning
      WiFi exposure than the Control group and tended to perceive themselves as being
      more sensitive to EMF after the experiment compared to before. Sensational media 
      reports can facilitate enhanced perception of tactile stimuli in healthy
      participants. People tending to perceive bodily symptoms as intense, disturbing, 
      and noxious seem most vulnerable. Receiving sensational media reports might
      sensitize people to develop a nocebo effect and thereby contribute to the
      development of IEI-EMF. By promoting catastrophizing thoughts and increasing
      symptom-focused attention, perception might more readily be enhanced and
      misattributed to EMF.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Brascher, Anne-Kathrin
AU  - Brascher AK
AD  - Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department for Clinical Psychology,
      Psychotherapy, and Experimental Psychopathology, Wallstrasse 3, 55122 Mainz,
      Germany. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Raymaekers, Koen
AU  - Raymaekers K
AD  - Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department for Clinical Psychology,
      Psychotherapy, and Experimental Psychopathology, Wallstrasse 3, 55122 Mainz,
      Germany; KU Leuven - University of Leuven, School Psychology and Development in
      Context, Belgium.
FAU - Van den Bergh, Omer
AU  - Van den Bergh O
AD  - KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Health Psychology, Belgium.
FAU - Witthoft, Michael
AU  - Witthoft M
AD  - Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department for Clinical Psychology,
      Psychotherapy, and Experimental Psychopathology, Wallstrasse 3, 55122 Mainz,
      Germany.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170403
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Environ Res
JT  - Environmental research
JID - 0147621
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Anxiety/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Electromagnetic Fields/*adverse effects
MH  - Female
MH  - Germany/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Medically Unexplained Symptoms
MH  - Multiple Chemical Sensitivity/*psychology
MH  - Random Allocation
MH  - Television
MH  - *Touch
MH  - *Wireless Technology
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Expectation
OT  - Idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields
      (IEI-EMF)
OT  - Media
OT  - Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS)
OT  - Nocebo effect
EDAT- 2017/04/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/13 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/27 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/27 [accepted]
AID - S0013-9351(17)30080-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.envres.2017.03.040 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Environ Res. 2017 Jul;156:265-271. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2017.03.040. Epub 2017
      Apr 3.